Social Studies Education
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Follow the French: Say Adieu to "Miss"

Follow the French: Say Adieu to "Miss" | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Is it okay to just let every woman choose for herself? What if she has chosen, but others continue to refer to her by a different and unwanted title?

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Social Studies Education
Looking for new and exciting resources for social studies educators.  Resources found here are not endorsed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
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A Whole New World in Boston Public Schools

A Whole New World in Boston Public Schools | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
GEOGRAPHY Students throughout Boston are getting a radically different view of the world, one map projection at a time. (NPR) Why is designing a world map so difficult? Use our activity to better understand what distortions occur when modeling a spherical surface on a flat map. Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key…
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Boston Public Schools have switched to using the Gall-Peters map projection instead of the historically common Mercator.  It's an interesting read in looking at WHY this decision was made, and Nat Geo also offers some lesson ideas for teaching about map projections.  
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Appeals court affirms order to remove Confederate monuments

Appeals court affirms order to remove Confederate monuments | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
A federal appeals court has upheld a ruling allowing New Orleans to remove three Confederate monuments in the city – likely resolving the case in which the Southern Poverty Law Center and others filed a legal brief that urged the monuments’ removal and documented their connections to the Confederacy’s legacy of white supremacy.
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Could lead to some interesting inquiries in the classroom - should Confederate monuments be removed?  
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When Teaching Slavery Goes Wrong

When Teaching Slavery Goes Wrong | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
This morning I came across a wonderful series of tweets from historian Kidada Williams, who was responding to recent controversies involving k-12 teachers and lesson plans about slavery that go very wrong. We've all seen these reports. Teachers with the best of intentions set up mock slave auctions
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Very interesting blog post on the mistakes in teaching slavery that we see happen way too often.  
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Gender Reversal Teaches Uncomfortable Lessons - Marginal REVOLUTION

Gender Reversal Teaches Uncomfortable Lessons - Marginal REVOLUTION | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
How would the Trump-Clinton debates have been perceived if the genders had been reversed? Two professors worked with trained actors to duplicate not just the words but also the mannerisms of Trump and Clinton–only with a female actor playing Trump, now […]
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This is an absolutely fascinating look at gender reversal in the 2016 presidential election debates.  Take a look - what happens when a woman is speaking Donald Trump's lines, and a  man is speaking Hilary Clinton's?  Perhaps not what you expect...
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Visualizing Gender Inequality in a Feminist Bookstore - Sociological Images

Visualizing Gender Inequality in a Feminist Bookstore - Sociological Images | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The Society Pages (TSP) is an open-access social science project headquartered in the Department of Sociology at the University of Minnesota
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A bookstore turned all books written by males backwards...so what do you see?
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Virtual Field Trip Data Base

Virtual Field Trip Data Base | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Full List

Type, Grade Level, Subject, Topic, Title, Link, Price, Special Dates, Notes
Live, K-12, STEM, Adaptation, Adapt to Survive, http:// www. perotmuseum. org/ events-and-programs/ school-programs/ sciencecast-distance-learning/ index. html, Free
Live, 3-4, STEM, Agriculture, Cotton
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Contemporary Antisemitism and Youth

Contemporary Antisemitism and Youth | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Students reflect on present-day antisemitism encountered online and on college campuses, and explore examples of youth who are standing up to it.
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From Facing History & Ourselves - help students understand Antisemitism.
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Are We Covering or Are Students Discovering?

Are We Covering or Are Students Discovering? | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Rather than "covering" a curriculum with instruction driven by a textbook, the authors advocate planning lessons that focus on big ideas & student understanding
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Visualizing Emancipation

Visualizing Emancipation | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Visualizing Emancipation is an ongoing mapping project, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, that sheds light on when and where men and women became free in the Civil War South. It tells the complex story of emancipation by mapping documentary evidence of black men and women's activities--using official military correspondence, newspapers, and wartime letters and diaries--alongside the movements of Union regiments and the shifting legal status of slavery.
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Interactive map of documentary evidence of slavery emancipation.
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Why schools have stopped teaching American history

Why schools have stopped teaching American history | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
"Don’t know much about history . . ." goes the famous song. It’s an apt motto for the Common Core’s elementary-school curriculum.

And it’s becoming a serious problem.

A 2014 report by the National Assessment of Educational Progress showed that an abysmal 18 percent of American high-school kids were proficient in US history. When colleges such as Stanford decline to require Western Civilization classes or high schools propose changing their curriculum so that history is taught only from 1877 onward (this happened in North Carolina), it’s merely a blip in our news cycle.

A 2012 story in Perspectives on History magazine by University of North Carolina professor Bruce VanSledright found that 88 percent of elementary-school teachers considered teaching history to be a low priority.

The reasons are varied. VanSledright found that teachers didn’t focus on history because the students aren’t tested on it at the state level. Why teach something you can’t test?

A teacher I spoke with in Brooklyn confirmed this. She said, “all the pressure in lower grades is in math and English Language Arts because of the state tests and the weight that they carry.”

She teaches fourth grade and says that age is the first time students are taught about explorers, American settlers, the American Revolution and so on. But why so late?

VanSledright also found that teachers just didn’t know enough history to teach it. He wrote there was some “holiday curriculum as history instruction,” but that was it.

Arthur, a father in Brooklyn whose kids are in first and second grade at what’s considered an excellent public school, says that’s the only kind of history lesson he’s seen. And even that’s been thin. His second-grade daughter knows George Washington was the first president but not why Abraham Lincoln is famous.

As the parent of a first-grader, I’ve also seen even the “holiday curriculum” in short supply. First grade might seem young, but it’s my daughter’s third year in the New York City public-school system after pre-K and kindergarten. She goes to one of the finest public schools in the city, yet knows about George Washington exclusively from the soundtrack of the Broadway show “Hamilton.” She wouldn’t be able to tell you who discovered America.

So far, she has encountered no mention of any historical figure except for Martin Luther King Jr. This isn’t a knock on King, obviously. He’s a hero in our house. But he can’t be the sum total of historical figures our kids learn about in even early elementary school.

For one thing, how do we tell King’s story without telling the story of the Founding Fathers, the Constitution or of Abraham Lincoln? King’s protests were effective because they were grounded in the idea that America was supposed to be something specific, that the Constitution said so — and that we weren’t living up to those ideals.

The Brooklyn teacher I spoke with says instructors balk when it comes to history: They don’t want to offend anyone. “The more vocal and involved the parents are, the more likely the teacher will feel uncomfortable to teach certain things or say something that might create a problem.” Which leaves . . . Martin Luther King.

She cited issues around Thanksgiving, like teaching the story of pilgrims and the Native Americans breaking bread together as one teachers might sideline for fear of parents complaining. Instead of addressing sticky subjects, we skip them altogether.

As colleges around the country see protests to remove Thomas Jefferson’s statues from their campuses, it’s becoming the norm to erase the parts of history that we find uncomfortable. It’s not difficult to teach children that the pilgrims or Thomas Jefferson were imperfect yet still responsible for so much that is good in America.

Jay Leno used to do a segment on his show called “JayWalking,” where he’d come up to people on the street and ask them what should’ve been easy historical questions. That their responses were funny and cringeworthy enough to get them on the show tells you how well it went.

Leno never asked the year the Magna Carta was published or when North Dakota became a state. He would ask what country we fought in the Revolutionary War, to name the current vice president or how many stars are on the American flag. And yet adults had no idea.

We talk often about how fractured our country has become. That our division increases while school kids are taught less and less about our shared history should come as no surprise.
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Outlines the loss of elementary social studies.  What effects are we seeing?  
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Battling Fake News in the Classroom

Battling Fake News in the Classroom | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
See how one educator helps students develop media literacy—a critical 21st-century skill.
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Another thought-provoking article on fake news and the role of social studies.
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Reading Like a Historian: Re-Assessing Reliability

Reading Like a Historian: Re-Assessing Reliability | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
When analyzing historical documents, students need to be able to effectively reassess the reliability of their sources. Learn how teachers can effectively teach when and how to reassess the reliability of a source.
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Fantastic (short) video of a teacher in action, working with students on reliability of resources.  
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Fake news is why you exist. And 12 tools that can help

Fake news is why you exist. And 12 tools that can help | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Okay. Basic question. "If I asked you to describe what you do every day as a social studies teacher, what would I hear?" Let me rephrase that a bit. "If I asked you to describe what you should be doing every day as a social studies teacher, what would I hear?" Here's my point. I…
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Interesting blog post from Glenn at HistoryTech - and some great resources!
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About a Boy–On the Sociological Relevance of Calvin (and Hobbes) - Sociological Images

About a Boy–On the Sociological Relevance of Calvin (and Hobbes) - Sociological Images | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The Society Pages (TSP) is an open-access social science project headquartered in the Department of Sociology at the University of Minnesota
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Do YOU use Calvin and Hobbes in Sociology class?  :D
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Primarily Teaching Summer Workshop for Educators

Primarily Teaching Summer Workshop for Educators | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
This summer, join us for one of our Primarily Teaching workshops for educators on using historical documents in the classroom. We'll conduct research with original documents in the holdings of the National Archives and Presidential Libraries. Discover some of those incredible teachable documents that help educators and students unlock the past. You will explore a specific…
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Great opportunity for summer professional development with the National Archives
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Copy of Songs to Use in History / Literature Lessons

Copy of Songs to Use in History / Literature Lessons | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Sheet1

Song Title, Artist, Unit, Relevant Topic/ Theme?, Link?, Submitted by
Russians, Sting, Cold War, Idle threats, senseless agression, human impact of politics, http:// bit. ly/ 1mCxuAQ,@ davidhochheiser
Ironic, Alanis Morisette, Figurative Language, Irony, https:// www. youtube. com
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Crowdsourced songs for use in the classroom - we know  how much music means to many teenagers, and this is a GREAT way to make connections!
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A Flag, a Dinner Bell, and a Hand-Dug Well: Using Artifacts to Make Meaningful Connections to the Past - American Historical Association

A Flag, a Dinner Bell, and a Hand-Dug Well: Using Artifacts to Make Meaningful Connections to the Past - American Historical Association | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
An AHA 2017 session introduced Michelle Martin to new strategies for using artifacts to reinterpret history at historic house museums.
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A look at the hidden or unwritten history in living history museums, and the use of artifacts in living history.  The author uses the example of the Little House on the Prairie living history museum in Kansas and the lack of any mention of the land the Ingalls family built their home on was actually highly contested Osage land.  
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How Will History Books Record the Events of Your Lifetime?

How Will History Books Record the Events of Your Lifetime? | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
A new tool from The Atlantic allows you to explore your time on earth so far through the lens of history.
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The Atlantic unveiled a new tool that looks at what has happened in your lifetime.  Very fun!
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Play "The Fiscal Ship" and make your own plan to keep U.S. debt from rising

Play "The Fiscal Ship" and make your own plan to keep U.S. debt from rising
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Online game to help students better understand the US debt.
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What’s Happening at the Oroville Dam?

What’s Happening at the Oroville Dam? | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
UNITED STATES The damaged California dam is in the spotlight now, but it’s not alone among the facilities needing upgrades. (Nat Geo News) Why do we have dams? Use our resources to better understand. Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers Toolkit, including today’s MapMaker Interactive map. Discussion Ideas…
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Great blog from Nat Geo not only on the potential failure at Oroville Dam, but national infrastructure, severe weather changes, and solutions.  
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Researchers uncover vast numbers of unknown Nazi killing fields

Researchers uncover vast numbers of unknown Nazi killing fields | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The 'Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos,' set for completion in 2025, has now documented 42,500 sites of Nazi persecution -- over eight times more than predicted. And the number keeps on rising
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Cool Tools Are Fun, But Learning Should Come First

Cool Tools Are Fun, But Learning Should Come First | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Some teachers can get caught up in the latest ed- tech resources and forget to prioritize educational value above all else.
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How Students Critiquing One Another’s Work Raises The Quality Bar

How Students Critiquing One Another’s Work Raises The Quality Bar | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
When students practice giving kind, specific and helpful feedback on each other's work, they learn the value of revision and define for themselves what quality
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Why Reconstruction Matters After this Election

Why Reconstruction Matters After this Election | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Understanding the history of the Reconstruction era can help students make sense of current events after the most recent presidential election.
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Rich Web Resources to Raise Cultural Awareness

Rich Web Resources to Raise Cultural Awareness | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Curtis Chandler looks at how educators can help students become more aware, understanding and appreciative of other kids and cultures, using rich web resources.
Kristen McDaniel's insight:
Another great article from MiddleWeb - this one on using the internet to raise cultural awareness.  I love the comparison of pictures on ancient Egypt, having students look at the foci of each - and then finding current examples, and even an Egyptian student.  
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