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Looking for new and exciting resources for social studies educators. Resources found here are not endorsed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

These kinds of map overlays just fascinate me - take a look at Chicago before and after the Great Fire!

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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 2014 5:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 9, 2:15 PM

Fantastic collection!

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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The Rise of Megacities

The Rise of Megacities | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities.

 

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 

 

Tags: urban, megacities.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:28 PM

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Download the data yourself as a CSV file and your can import this into ArcGIS online and symbolize your map with any of the columns in the dataset.  


Tags: urban, megacities.


Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:00 PM

Very cool!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 3:36 PM

World cities and megacities - Presently , the mega cities of the world have to have a population of at least 10,000. Many cities are very near the minimum to be considered a mega city, but are not quite there. By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, is estimated to be home to 29 megacities.

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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The High Line

The High Line | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The official Web site of the High Line and Friends of the High Line...

 

What do you do with an outdated elevated train line running through a crowded neighborhood in New York City?  In the 1980s, residents called for the demolition of the eyesore since it was blamed for economic struggles of the community and increased criminal activity.  Unfortunately demolition is extremely expensive.  However, this one particular abandoned line has recently been converted into an elevated green space that has economically revitalized the local real estate.  Find out more about this innovated park and project.  To see a similar project in Saint Louis, see: http://grgstl.org/projects/the-trestle.aspx


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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Population Bracketology

Population Bracketology | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Try the Population Bracketology game from @uscensusbureau! Weekly data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau compares populations for US states and metro areas.

Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

Try bracketology for geography while you're waiting for games to start!  :)

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 19, 2013 4:54 PM

Get into the spirit of March Madness by challenging your knowledge on the sizes of Metropolitan Statistic Areas and state population (just think electoral college).  I got a 56 on my first stab (59 for the states)...what did you get?  

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, March 20, 2013 8:34 AM

Although I've never been very good at brackets, I have a better shot with this one!  Neat way to engage students with population data!

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 10, 9:15 PM

I got 52 on both, some surprises for me.

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from History and Social Studies Education
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London, the Olympics and Geography

London, the Olympics and Geography | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

The Geographical Association has produced numerous resources specifically for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games being held in London.  The Olympics as an event work as an important teaching moment that operates on numerous scales.  What local developmental projects reshaped the urban fabric of London in preparation for these Games?  Do international events such as the Olympics foster a global community?  Is this idea of a global community perfectly harmonious?    


Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Where America Needs Doctors

Where America Needs Doctors | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

What is the geography of medical practicioners?  Why are doctors concentrated more in certain parts of the country?  "If anything, this map illustrates how much where you live matters for how much health care you have access to. The 17,000 residents of Clark County, Miss. do not have a single primary care doctor in the area. Up in Manhattan there is one doctor for every 500 people."  Click on the link for an interactive ESRI-produced StoryMap. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Melissa Marin's comment, April 9, 2012 2:31 PM
It makes me wonder what is preventing doctors from relocating to areas with high need more medical care... If not income, then what is preventing them from benefiting from the high need for supply?
Max Minard's curator insight, March 21, 8:17 PM

The map shown above portrays the need of medical offices in each county of America. As you can see, areas on the eastern side have very little need for more doctor's offices while many areas in the Midwest and central parts of America have very little or even lack any offices at all. According to the report, the map seems to illustrate the importance of one's county based on the amount of health care provided. Also, when looking at the basic pattern on the map, how come the low amounts of health care offices are mainly located in these certain areas? What prevents it from being even all around. All along the central areas from Texas to North Dakota, there is an excessive amount of counties with no access to doctor's office at all. This surprised me and made me think why the pattern is so evident. Are these certain areas have an economic disadvantage compared to others? I personally believe that the federal government needs to attend to this counties in need. I suppose that they are in fact dealing with economic issues and that they can't afford health care offices. I may be wrong but based off the location of these areas, my inference leads me to think this and more medical attention needs to be brought to the Midwest in hopes of developing better health care in these such areas. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 6:54 PM

Summary:  This map analyzes two things,  how many Americans need a doctor in general per county, and how many Americans need a very specialized doctor per county.

 

Insight:  This map demonstrates what we learned in Unit 2 because it is a collection of geographic data presented spatially for geographic analysis.