Social Studies Education
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Looking for new and exciting resources for social studies educators.  Resources found here are not endorsed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city

What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Maps bring the horror of Hiroshima home -- literally.  

Alex Wellerstein, a nuclear historian at the Stevens Institute of Technology, created a NukeMap that allows you to visualize what the Hiroshima and Nagasaki explosions would look like in your hometown. Kuang Keng Kuek Ser at Public Radio International has also developed a version, using slightly different estimates.

Here is what Little Boy, the Hiroshima bomb, would look like on Wellerstein's map if detonated in New York City."


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

The NukeMap allows you to set different determinations such as bomb size, etc, as well.  

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 8, 2015 11:53 AM

Human Nature!

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 11:48 AM

I highly suggest tinkering around with "NukeMap," as I have spent the last 30 minutes seeing how different bombs would destroy my neighborhood and the surrounding areas- it will even adjust for varying casualty rates in areas with higher or lower populations, even just by moving the detonation site a couple of streets away. It's pretty cool at the surface, but to examine the destructive capabilities of some of these weapons is downright terrifying. You view the blast radius encompassing your home, your entire existence, on a computer screen, and its easy to forget the devastation of it all disappearing. For those who survived the atomic bombs dropped at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there was no simulation to tinker with, but instead a reality more terrible than anything I've ever had to endure in my own personal life. Thousands of lives lost, thousands more left irreversibly shattered, never to be the same again. All because men in government buildings on opposite sides of the ocean couldn't get along. No one wins in war.

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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In Remembrance: Teaching September 11

In Remembrance: Teaching September 11 | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

The the United States, 9/11 is memorialized in our landscapes and is etched in our collective consciousness.  This coming Tuesday is the anniversary and Teaching History has put together a host of teaching materials about the importance and impact of the terrorist attacks of Septemper 11th, 2001 on the U.S. and the world.

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Aaron Feliciano's comment, September 12, 2012 5:47 PM
9/11 will always be remembered in the eyes of americans and they will never forget what they were doing that day. i know i will not