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Looking for new and exciting resources for social studies educators. Resources found here are not endorsed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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The Separatist Map of Africa

The Separatist Map of Africa | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
When African states gained independence, the continent's new leaders agreed to respect the old colonial borders to avoid endless wars.

 

This interactive map shows the major conflicts on the African continent where the combatants have geopolitical aspirations to separate from the state and create a new, autonomous state.  Click on the red arrows and you can read about the warring factions and the current situation in that region.   

 

Tags: political, governance, Africa, unit 4 political, war, conflict, states, colonialism.


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

Fascinating interactive map looking at the separatist movements in Africa.  

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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 11:48 PM

Unit IV - Non American

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:04 AM

is sad to see how people just refer to it as "Africa" when every part has its own name. Even myself don't know many of them since they are irrelevant for the western people.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:08 AM

This interactive map does a great job of not only showing the sate of political struggles and military conflict within the whole of Africa. This shows the new countries many dissidents  and rebels wish to establish in order to give their people a cultural and ethnic home land. This give a good picture of simply how chaotic some parts of Africa truly are and how destabilized many regions are. 

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Arms Trade

Arms Trade | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

This interactive requires WebGL (viewable in Chrome).  Even more compelling than the data is the visualization platform. 


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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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No, a nation’s geography is not its destiny

No, a nation’s geography is not its destiny | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
One of the most widely accepted alternative theories of world inequality is the geography hypothesis, which claims that the great divide between rich and poor countries is created by geographical differences.

 

This article is an excerpt of the forthcoming book "Why Nations Fail" that should serve as an ideological counterweight to the book "Guns, Germs and Steel."  The authors argue that the wealth of a country is most closely correlated with the degree to which the average person shares in the overall growth of its economy, meaning that political institutions are more relevant to economic success and development than physical geographic resources. 

 

For more on this upcoming book and it's hypothesis see this NY Times review: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/18/magazine/why-countries-go-bust.html


Via Seth Dixon
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mb's comment, March 20, 2012 1:23 PM
the authors write a blog as well: http://whynationsfail.com/
Tony Burton's comment, March 20, 2012 1:38 PM
Thanks for the link!
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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In Remembrance: Teaching September 11

In Remembrance: Teaching September 11 | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

The the United States, 9/11 is memorialized in our landscapes and is etched in our collective consciousness.  This coming Tuesday is the anniversary and Teaching History has put together a host of teaching materials about the importance and impact of the terrorist attacks of Septemper 11th, 2001 on the U.S. and the world.

 


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Aaron Feliciano's comment, September 12, 2012 5:47 PM
9/11 will always be remembered in the eyes of americans and they will never forget what they were doing that day. i know i will not
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices

The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Rising gas prices make people unhappy, but the pain is felt most acutely in states where it is unlikely to make an electoral difference.

 

There are numerous geographic themes that make this article a worthwhile read.  The evidence suggests that states the vote more solidly Republican are being hit hardest at the pump.  Gasoline expenditures as a share of personal income are higher in pro-Republican states than pro-Democrat states.  Understanding the demographic base of each party as well as population density explains much of this issue: states that are very rural drive greater distances with less public transit option, spending more per capita on gasoline.  Also, since the most affluent urban centers are Democrat-leaning, they spend a less sizeable portion of their income on gasoline.  This article would be a nice resource for a classroom/small group discussion.  


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Siobhan Chantigian's curator insight, April 23, 2014 11:39 PM

This is an interesting article about how rising gas prices and how people are going to vote.  

Annie Christofferson's comment, April 27, 2014 6:06 PM
I thought this it was interesting how it said that the states that it really makes a difference in are the ones that don't have as big an impact on the electoral college. It doesn't seem quite fair.
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Using Music to teach about Rwanda

Using Music to teach about Rwanda | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

When teaching about ethnic conflicts, especially the Rwandan Genocide, it easy to overlook the influence of music and it’s role in the genocide. The following website discusses the involvement of Simon Bikindi, and Bikindi’s music which was broadcasted on the anti-Tutsi/pro-genocide radio station “RTLM.” These Bikindi songs (along with his biography) can be compelling hook to serve as an introduction to ethnic conflicts.


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