Social Studies Education
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Looking for new and exciting resources for social studies educators.  Resources found here are not endorsed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Analyzing Maps to Better Understand Global Current Events and History

Analyzing Maps to Better Understand Global Current Events and History | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
In this lesson, we provide strategies to help students accurately interpret maps, and we suggest ways for using current event maps as a tool to better understand both history and what’s going on in the world today.

Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

The NY Times learning blog really has some interesting, insightful lessons.  This one looks at using maps to understand culture and history, and how it affects today.  

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2016 10:08 AM

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tagsmapping, K12, scale, location.

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 2016 12:44 AM

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 


 


Tagsmapping, K12, scale, location.

Nora Morton's curator insight, October 10, 2016 1:54 PM
A fantastic source on how to use maps in the classrooms and questions to help guide students into further exploration.  Provides numerous links to help understand the background and various types of maps, samples linking history with current events, and tools to create your own maps. 
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city

What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Maps bring the horror of Hiroshima home -- literally.  

Alex Wellerstein, a nuclear historian at the Stevens Institute of Technology, created a NukeMap that allows you to visualize what the Hiroshima and Nagasaki explosions would look like in your hometown. Kuang Keng Kuek Ser at Public Radio International has also developed a version, using slightly different estimates.

Here is what Little Boy, the Hiroshima bomb, would look like on Wellerstein's map if detonated in New York City."


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

The NukeMap allows you to set different determinations such as bomb size, etc, as well.  

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 8, 2015 11:53 AM

Human Nature!

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 11:48 AM

I highly suggest tinkering around with "NukeMap," as I have spent the last 30 minutes seeing how different bombs would destroy my neighborhood and the surrounding areas- it will even adjust for varying casualty rates in areas with higher or lower populations, even just by moving the detonation site a couple of streets away. It's pretty cool at the surface, but to examine the destructive capabilities of some of these weapons is downright terrifying. You view the blast radius encompassing your home, your entire existence, on a computer screen, and its easy to forget the devastation of it all disappearing. For those who survived the atomic bombs dropped at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there was no simulation to tinker with, but instead a reality more terrible than anything I've ever had to endure in my own personal life. Thousands of lives lost, thousands more left irreversibly shattered, never to be the same again. All because men in government buildings on opposite sides of the ocean couldn't get along. No one wins in war.

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

 

Tags: mapping, historical, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

Old maps just draw me in...what a great primary source to address the slavery population in the South in the 1850s.  

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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Mercator Puzzle

Mercator Puzzle | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

Great site to show projection and changes in perception on maps.  

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Tony Hall's curator insight, February 5, 2013 12:09 AM

This is great fun! A little tricky at first though:)

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:45 PM

This mercator puzzle was especially interesting. It illustrated how various countries look on a mercator map compared to other maps.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:45 PM

Cool activity / puzzle that plays with projection and shows you a comparative view of the "true" size of countries compared to others 

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Arms Trade

Arms Trade | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

This interactive requires WebGL (viewable in Chrome).  Even more compelling than the data is the visualization platform. 


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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Interactive Map: Economic Stress Index

Interactive Map: Economic Stress Index | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

This is a great interactive feature focusing on the differential impacts of the economic downturn on particular places.  You can zoom in, see county-level data, and slide the time bar at the bottom to get spatiotemporal data.    


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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Map orientation: When true north is NOT at the top

Map orientation: When true north is NOT at the top | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
We got an excellent comment from a reader this week about maps that are not drawn with true north at the top.

 

We've all be 'turned around' when navigating in semi-familiar or unfamiliar territory.  How to we reorient ourselves?  When the map is NOT facing north, there typically better be a compelling reason that will help the map users to orient themselves to their particular spatial circumstances (oftentime they are reference maps for tourists).  Do you prefer maps to always face north?  Why or why not?  What does this say about our mental maps and spatial thinking patterns? 


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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Syria: Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis

Syria: Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Thousands of refugees, many of them fleeing the brutal conflict in Syria, are streaming across Europe in search of safety and security.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:29 AM

Syrian refugees

Emma Boyle's curator insight, October 2, 2015 1:58 PM

For your debate research.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 23, 2015 11:42 AM

This story map is a great visual of the current refugee crisis. This would be a helpful aid in describing the geographical barriers refugees face and how it affects them. For example the map shows where highest concentrations of deaths occur, naturally it is in the ocean. The ocean is a barrier for fleeing refugees. Think about how different landscapes and land forms can affect refugees available paths to flee

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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

Very interesting article on how map projections potentially effect our view of the world.  

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samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:53 PM

helps show the different perspectives of our world and how it has changed. also shows many different forms of mapping our world throughout time.

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:34 AM

UNIT 1 

This article discusses map projections and how they shape our perception of the world. Maps influence how we see the world, and could change the way we see it as well. These projections show us many different views of the Earth, which is very influential to our perspectives. This applies to unit 1 and its major concepts and underlying geographical perspective such as analyzing maps. 

Vicki S Albritton's curator insight, August 26, 2016 8:35 PM
What we see isn't always what is.
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

These kinds of map overlays just fascinate me - take a look at Chicago before and after the Great Fire!

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 9, 2015 2:15 PM

Fantastic collection!

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, January 6, 2016 5:02 PM

Entre art et géographie...

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from History and Social Studies Education
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Latitude and Longitude of a Point

Latitude and Longitude of a Point | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Find the latitude and longitude of a point using Google Maps.

 

Simple, straightforward and easy to use.  All you do is point and click on the map to get latitude and longitude in both decimal degrees and DMS (degrees, minutes and seconds).  You can also quickly enter coordinates in either format an have the location displayed on the map.

 

Tags: GPS, mapping, location.


Via Seth Dixon
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Wade Lytal's curator insight, August 26, 2015 4:23 PM

This can help with your homework assignment. 

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 11:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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The Prime Meridian: Natural or Cultural?

The Prime Meridian: Natural or Cultural? | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

An infographic on the Prime Meridian.  Is it time to change where the focal points of world maps lands?


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mderder's comment, February 19, 2012 5:04 PM
The system works fine as is. Maybe down the line, when it would be far easier to quickly change the global coordinate system, this thing would be feasible. Now, though, it would needlessly entail a huge amount of labor. Just think of all the PRINTED materials which could cause confusion. You would have to change out EVERY chart on EVERY seagoing vessel in the WORLD. That, all by itself, is an enormous task, and in some areas would be economically prohibitive. Charts are NOT cheap. In the future, when everything is linked up and digital, it would be much easier. Now it would be a disaster. Some people don't think things through.