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Social Studies Education
Looking for new and exciting resources for social studies educators.  Resources found here are not endorsed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education!

82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | Social Studies Education |
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.


This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   


Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.

Via Seth Dixon
Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 8:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:51 AM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from History and Social Studies Education!

Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | Social Studies Education |
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.


In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   


Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 

Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:47 PM

This Dutch historian does a great job at interweaving places that were ridden by the second world war to its modern reconstruct. As a child, I use to question a lot what a place looked like prior to it being destroyed. In the context of Europe a continent, ridden by war, the historian not only does a great job at depicting past and present, her photographs also show how the country's government went to great lengths to preserve some of its land's historic sites.

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education!

Stratocam: Google Earth Imagery

Stratocam: Google Earth Imagery | Social Studies Education |
Explore and vote on the best Google Maps satellite imagery around the world.


Much like sites that you can rate items up or down, you can rate the best aerial photography via Google Earth screen shots.  There are some beautiful images and places to be discovered through this site.  The physical and human landscapes are both intermingled in this fantastic collection of careful, it can be amazingly addictive.  For more from the producer of this site, see:

Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education!

The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy | Social Studies Education |
After cutting a destructive path through the Caribbean, Hurricane Sandy caused extensive damage along the East Coast this week.


While the damage wasn't as bad as many feared it could have been, place and spatial context are especially important in assessing the impacts of a natural disaster.  This is a excellent collection of the many devastating images as a result of Hurricane Sandy.  To see some more local images, Rhode Island Department of Transportation put this collection together.   

Via Seth Dixon
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:18 PM
I am speechless, these images have just torn my heart. Here in Providence, Rhode Island listened to multiple people say "oh this storm was nothing" they apparently need to view these photos, to understand Sandy was a monster of a storm. Mother nature is powerful and she can do just about anything. I am so mind boggled by the images, roads completely torn apart I never knew this could happen from a hurricane. It really made me appreciate how safe I was but now seeing these images really makes me want to get out there and tell more people to look at what happened in NJ,CT,NYC, and other places around the coast. My next step now is to get a donation bin started to send over to those states in major need. This is sure another natural disaster to go down in history.
Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:11 PM
Just with the information given, I can see how much damage the storm actually caused. Flooding and high winds obviously don't go together well. Although some communities weren't hit as bad as previously anticipated, some areas were largely damaged and the money needed to rebuild will be tremendous.
Alaina Rahn's comment, October 4, 2013 10:14 AM
I think it is very sad. I didn't know it was that bad. Now that I see those pictures it makes me feel very bad for those people.
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from History and Social Studies Education!

40 Of The Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken

40 Of The Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken | Social Studies Education |
A moving collection of iconic photographs from the last 100 years that demonstrate the heartbreak of loss, the tremendous power of loyalty, and the triumph of the human spirit. Warning: Some of the...


So many of these images represent powerful  images that make history personal and show the strands of history during pivotal moments of change. 

Via Seth Dixon
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