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Looking for new and exciting resources for social studies educators.  Resources found here are not endorsed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  How factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    


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John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:03 PM

I was not aware that slavery is still not unusual in cocoa plantation in West Africa. It sickens me because nations all around the world consume chocolate produced under slave labor. 

AnthonyAcosta/NoahMata's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:36 PM

 (Social)

 

Chocolate is a very known thing in first world countries and is not known for what is needed to make it. So in Africa they smuggle children from various places in Africa and force them to labor for cocoa beans and work on plantations. Many young children near there   Teen ages are taken and put through labor for most of there young lives.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:13 PM

i mainly find it amazing that slavery is still so commonplace in parts of the world. whether it is "illegal" or not is irrelivent in these parts of the world and child labor and slavery is such a dominating force in labor.

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Food, Technology and Biodiversity

Food, Technology and Biodiversity | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
A Historian’s Take on Food and Food Politics...

 

This brief article highlights that as much as technology has changed food production, there this is much more that has remained the same.  Of the thousands of plants on Earth, 11 account for most of what we eat (corn, rice, wheat, cassava, potatoes, sorghum, millet, beans, barley rye and oats) .  Not surprisingly, those 11 plants are the same that have been cultivated by humans for thousands of years--makes you think that early humans, while not technologically advanced, were constantly conducting agricultural experiments and found many of the best animal and plant resources for human consumption.  This is one reason losing local indigenous knowledge about cultural ecology and the species' genetic diversity would be a great loss for humanity.  


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elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:27 PM
Eye opening!
Kyle Patchett's curator insight, September 2, 4:20 AM
This article explains in an emotive fashion that humans as a species aren't as diverse as first thought. The author, Rachel Laudan, explains that even as technology and food production has changed, much remains the same. There are on average 20,000 plants that are edible to humans, yet there are 11 plants that provide a steady diet for 93% of the worlds' population. These plants have been part of our diet for thousands of years and since the birth of farming itself. The article is produced from a food historians' point of view on the matter of change that we as a species have made. The information shows that even as technology, agriculture and farming has expanded, we have just found ways to do the same thing but slightly better than we previously had done.
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Analysis Finds 3x More Farmers’ Markets in Areas with the Lowest Obesity Rates

Analysis Finds 3x More Farmers’ Markets in Areas with the Lowest Obesity Rates | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
An independent analysis conducted by mapping analytics firm PetersonGIS shows that locations with the highest obesity rates contain the fewest farmers’ markets.

 

Agricultural production has become a big business, not only in total dollars, but in the scale of production.  In the last 50 years, the rise of 'agribusiness' has dominated the food industry and has redefined how food is produced.  In reaction to this, farmers' markets and organic farming is enjoying success within select demographic groups...and this study shows some of the results of that linkage.


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