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Looking for new and exciting resources for social studies educators. Resources found here are not endorsed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts

Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

A 'retronym' is a term specifying the original meaning of word after a newer meaning has overtaken it.


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

Very interesting look at how language changes over time.  Examples:  landline, "friend IRL", and vinyl.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 3, 9:06 AM

unit 3

God Is.'s curator insight, May 3, 1:15 PM

Some of you might appreciate this article.. Darn I feel old! LOL

A.K.Andrew's curator insight, May 6, 8:32 PM

Fantastic images for our modern day terms.

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Using Music to teach about Rwanda

Using Music to teach about Rwanda | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

When teaching about ethnic conflicts, especially the Rwandan Genocide, it easy to overlook the influence of music and it’s role in the genocide. The following website discusses the involvement of Simon Bikindi, and Bikindi’s music which was broadcasted on the anti-Tutsi/pro-genocide radio station “RTLM.” These Bikindi songs (along with his biography) can be compelling hook to serve as an introduction to ethnic conflicts.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

Just...WOW.  This infographic works to show connections between world religions over time.  

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Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 12:32 PM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the origins of each religion. Also, it shows the various relationships between religions. 

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This shows how a lot of religions are interconnected, and even if people think two religions are completely different, they might have similar roots, just like languages.

 

Graham Shroyer's religion: This relates to key issue 1 because it shows where religions originated and how they are all connected, like judaism and christianity.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This is relevant to Key Issue # 1 because it identifies the origions and relationships of the major world religions of today. These religious branches clearly show the relationships between majorly and minorly practiced religions.


Rishi Suresh:  This shows how, similiar to languages, many religions come in families and have distinct connections between them. 

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 4:42 AM

fascinating infographic on world religions.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:06 PM

The immense tree of world religions is presented as a graphic to tell connections of world religions and how far they've broken and changed.

The movement of ideas and people have helped caused these breaks in the religion by bringing ideas to new people, mixing with the present culture, and going further from the hearth of the religion.

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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The Pop vs. Soda Page

The Pop vs. Soda Page | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
A page that plots the geographic distribution of the terms "pop" and "soda" when used to describe carbonated beverages...

 

This is an old classic, but worth visiting when discussion regions diffusion and cultural identity.  This is a modern 'shibboleth' for the United States, a way to show where you are from to some extent.  What are other 'shibboleths' that make your region distinct?  


Via Seth Dixon
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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:23 PM
Other could mean "cola" or "drink"
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 16, 2012 5:05 PM
Such a neat map that certainly illustrates the differences between US states. Seeing this map and the reasons for the variation in name makes sense. Of course soda is called "Coke" in the south. Georgia is the home of the Coke Cola Factory.