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Looking for new and exciting resources for social studies educators. Resources found here are not endorsed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

 

Tags: mapping, historical, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

Old maps just draw me in...what a great primary source to address the slavery population in the South in the 1850s.  

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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 11:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.