Social Studies Education
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Looking for new and exciting resources for social studies educators.  Resources found here are not endorsed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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49 Maps That Explain The USA For Dummies

49 Maps That Explain The USA For Dummies | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The United States is mind-boggling. Right?!

Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

Lots of infographic maps for students.

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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, September 16, 2015 2:00 PM

Some of them are quite fascinating. Scooped from my professor.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 21, 2015 11:10 PM

It's to see these "maps" that "explain" the U.S. in almost a sarcastic matter. Americans are living in what researches call megaregions. After, doing our Map of the U.S. for an assignment, it becomes difficult to divide regions when one is so familiar with one area, in my case, New England. New England, or the Northeast, is considered a megaregion because there is high population density in this area. In the map that displays these megaregions, its interesting to see those areas that are emerging. For example, in the map it saids Cascadia is emegering which is the corner of the U.S., the state of Washington. 

Some people think that the U.S. population is spread throughout the whole map. Its interesting to actually realize that 47% of the U.S. has zero population. This was an awesome article thats loaded with fun interesting facts. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:32 PM

Understanding the landscape of our Country is important. The way to best understand it is to look at maps, especially these maps, and get a hold on what the country looks like. From the height of exploration to seeing where the most trees are within the country. This map has a lot of information for anyone who has questions.

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Population Bracketology

Population Bracketology | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Try the Population Bracketology game from @uscensusbureau! Weekly data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau compares populations for US states and metro areas.

Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

Try bracketology for geography while you're waiting for games to start!  :)

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, March 20, 2013 8:34 AM

Although I've never been very good at brackets, I have a better shot with this one!  Neat way to engage students with population data!

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 10, 2015 9:15 PM

I got 52 on both, some surprises for me.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:56 AM

I gotcha fantasy league right here.

Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices

The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Rising gas prices make people unhappy, but the pain is felt most acutely in states where it is unlikely to make an electoral difference.

 

There are numerous geographic themes that make this article a worthwhile read.  The evidence suggests that states the vote more solidly Republican are being hit hardest at the pump.  Gasoline expenditures as a share of personal income are higher in pro-Republican states than pro-Democrat states.  Understanding the demographic base of each party as well as population density explains much of this issue: states that are very rural drive greater distances with less public transit option, spending more per capita on gasoline.  Also, since the most affluent urban centers are Democrat-leaning, they spend a less sizeable portion of their income on gasoline.  This article would be a nice resource for a classroom/small group discussion.  


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Siobhan Chantigian's curator insight, April 23, 2014 11:39 PM

This is an interesting article about how rising gas prices and how people are going to vote.  

Annie Christofferson's comment, April 27, 2014 6:06 PM
I thought this it was interesting how it said that the states that it really makes a difference in are the ones that don't have as big an impact on the electoral college. It doesn't seem quite fair.
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Interactive Map: Economic Stress Index

Interactive Map: Economic Stress Index | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

This is a great interactive feature focusing on the differential impacts of the economic downturn on particular places.  You can zoom in, see county-level data, and slide the time bar at the bottom to get spatiotemporal data.    


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Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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Stunning map charts every river in U.S.

Stunning map charts every river in U.S. | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. is often thought of as a nation connected by roads—since the 1960s the Interstate Highway has defined American culture and led to untold economic prosperity. But a new map of the nation’s rivers tells a very different story.

Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

Seriously, I could stare at this map all day.  It is REALLY cool.  I'm thinking of all kinds of discussion it could bring to the classroom!

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Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:57 AM

In addition, using the theory of gravity , this map would make an interesting study in identifying the sources and tributaries of the major rivers. Just where are the highlands of America?

John Blunnie's curator insight, July 12, 2013 11:11 AM

Seeing this map really shows why almost all places in the U.S. have been inhabited before the industrial era.

Louis Culotta's comment, July 15, 2013 9:52 AM
this is a very cool way to get a good look at our nations river systems and how to best use them for productive and environmental safety of them.
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 11:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.
Rescooped by Kristen McDaniel from Geography Education
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What America Manufactures

What America Manufactures | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"It's a myth that the U.S. doesn't make anything anymore."  The U.S. economy still produces more through manufacturing tangible goods ($1.5 trillion) than it does in providing services ($600 billion) for the international market.  The maps and graphs in this article are great teaching materials.  The impact of NAFTA is shown powerfully in the regionalization of U.S. trade partners, making this salient material for a discussion on supranationalism as well.   


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:09 PM


This is great because now we can witness the creation of jobs in the country which can help the country get out of the depression that it is in. it also can help people get jobs and not have to worry about if there unemployment check is going enough to cover there expenses. Also people that are working are less likely to get depressed because they are not trapped in there homes because now they have something that is distracting them. But the United States is seeing a great improvement because of all the things being manufactured here. One good example is the Honda accord power plant and the ford motor company plant and even general motors in Detroit. all of these companies is helping the Americans get back into the workforce.

Nicholas Patrie's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:05 PM

i was surprised to see that our country still exports so many products. What i find even more surprising is that the top countries that are buying our good are our bordering countries, Canada and Mexico. As much Petroleum we receive from the middle east we still are exporting so much of it to Canada and Mexico. It seems that foreign cars such as ones from Japan are taking over the industry yet our top export to Canada is car parts. it is good to see that America still exports.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 12:03 PM

I was surprised and reassured to see how much the U.S. exports to other parts of the world.  I was unaware that the U.S exported to China because we physically surrounded by items made in China. Although our imports exceed exports, we are still producing,