Social Studies
37 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Opinion: Sadly, Malthus was right. Now what?

Opinion: Sadly, Malthus was right. Now what? | Social Studies | Scoop.it
We seem bound to learn the hard way that there really is a limit to how many people the Earth can support.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 26, 8:23 AM

Well stated!

From Seth Dixon - His insight:

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 8:01 PM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  


Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 


Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

Danielle Yen's curator insight, March 10, 9:23 AM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Transformational Teaching and Technology
Scoop.it!

The Power of a Positive Attitude

The Power of a Positive Attitude | Social Studies | Scoop.it
Be positive . . . A positive attitude can improve your health, enhance your relationships, increase your chances of success, and add years to your life.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Positive-Psychology

 


Via Gust MEES, Chris Carter
more...
Betty Skeet's curator insight, May 15, 2015 5:12 AM

A positive attitude is a powerful tool...

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, May 15, 2015 12:44 PM

El poder de la mente...The Power of a Positive Attitude | @scoopit via @knolinfos http://sco.lt/...

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, May 18, 2015 5:01 PM

POSITIVE ATTITUDES CAN APPEAR TO BE NEGATIVE AT TIMES. WE OFTEN WONDERED HOW WE WAS SUPPOSE TO BE WILLINGLY SERVANTS WITH JOYFUL ATTITUDE UNTIL WE REALISED SOME OF THE NEGATIVE HAPPENED INTENTIONALY AND AS SUCH IT REMOVED SOME OF THE NEGATIVE THAT WE WOULD NEVER OWN UP TO BUT IS SOME WHERE WITHIN US AND EITHER WE KNOW IT BUT YET DENY IT OR DENY IT BUT KNOW IT IS THERE. BUT THERE ARE THINGS THAT OCCUR THAT WILL MAKE A NEGATIVE LOOKING SITUATION OR CIRCUMSTANCE WITH U/WE REVEAL THE POSITIVE ATTITUDE THAT IS IN THE HEART REFLECTED OUT.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Teaching Psychology
Scoop.it!

Ten Disciplines of a Learner: Learning vs Mastery

Ten Disciplines of a Learner: Learning vs Mastery | Social Studies | Scoop.it

Ten Disciplines of a Learner
We decided to continue the conversation on this topic at a faculty meeting. Several meetings later we had a new report card. We decided to give two grades and average them—one for “Learning,” the other for “Mastery.”

Sara might get an “F” in mastery and an “A” in learning, culminating in a “C” for the course. To be rigorous we picked ten observable behaviors and named them “Disciplines of a Learner:”

1.     Asks questions

2.     Builds on other people’s ideas

3.     Uses mistakes as learning opportunities

4.     Takes criticism constructively

5.     Speaks up

6.     Welcomes a challenge

7.     Takes risks

8.     Listens with an openness to change

9.     Perseveres in tasks

10.   Decides when to lead and when to follow.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 


Via Gust MEES, PsychoPlum
more...
ManufacturingStories's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:01 AM

Mastery versus Learning - Lots of thought provoking ideas here...

Nancy Jones's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:57 AM

Love this examination of 'Disciplines of a Learner" that clearly distinguishes between master and learning. I think we should demonstrate greater value to the lifelong skill of learning .

Carv Wilson's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:01 AM

Like the questions.

 

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

A Brief History of U.S. Diplomacy

A Brief History of U.S. Diplomacy | Social Studies | Scoop.it

"The pages that follow trace the history of U.S. diplomacy from the first defensive steps of a fledgling nation to the global reach of a superpower. Benjamin Franklin is regarded as America’s first diplomat, and the four men pictured above were its first 'ministers of foreign affairs.'"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Coast to Coast: Baseball Hall of Fame Geography Lessons

Coast to Coast:  Baseball Hall of Fame Geography Lessons | Social Studies | Scoop.it

The history of baseball reflects the story of expansion in the United States. New cities have emerged and modern stadiums have been built as a growing population fueled the popularity of our National Pastime. The result is an extensive network of baseball teams at every level - from the major leagues to the little leagues - that represent the communities and environments in which they play. Everything from jersey colors, names, and symbols to the foods served at ballparks reflects the local landscape and culture of baseball teams. A simple game that began with a bat and ball is now a comprehensive case study of how people and geography are interrelated.

 
All of the lessons and activities have been prepared to accompany "Geography: Baseball Coast to Coast." You will find that the curriculum is organized into three levels: Level 1 for elementary school students, Level 2 for middle school students, and Level 3 for high school students.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 4, 2014 10:07 PM

Thanks to the NCGE and the Baseball Hall of Fame for working together to bring us these great resources...play ball!!  On a local note, what baseball team is the most popular in your area?  Is there a geography to fan support? 

Marianne Hart's curator insight, April 23, 2014 11:28 AM

 Local teams, stadium name, mascot, Great addition to #MysterySkype

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:50 PM

It neat to think as the population grew a new city needed a new field and team and they use the landscape and culture around them to help decide factors of a team including the name and mascot and even the food. An example would be although you would find hot dogs in every stadium its probably a specialty in Chicago while in New York its pizza and down south in Texas its nachos. 

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Urban Morphology in Mexico City

Urban Morphology in Mexico City | Social Studies | Scoop.it

"Mexico City is a giant laboratory of urban morphology. Its 20 million residents live in neighborhoods based on a wide spectrum of plans.  The colonial center (above) was built on the foundations of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire. The old city was on an island in Lake Texcoco. The lake was drained to prevent flooding as the city expanded.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, October 6, 2015 1:18 PM
Even thought this article is more picture based it shows a interesting example of what Mexico City is all about and how it is laid out. With the different layouts it's just amazing how many different one there are. There are normal standard rectangle and square layouts. One was even built on a drained lake in order to expand the city and prevent the city from flooding. One picture has what looks like a maze of roads and an interesting convergence of where the roads meet up. Overall with so many different layouts it could get confusing to one who may not be from there.
Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:40 PM

While this scoop may reflect neighborhoods in Mexico, I feel like there is alot to be learned from it. The way human activity greatly affect the geographical landscape is undeniable in these photos. Areas were at one point a beautiful lake, trees and wild life inhabited, are now concrete jungles. In most of these images you cannot even see a patch of grass.

 I would be excited to see how specific neighborhood cultures develop considering the close proximity of people. I think that could be a really neat study. Is it like America in the early 1900's, segregation of religions, languages, and ethnic backgrounds? Or are the people close,  and friendly?

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 5:19 PM

It is interesting to see how Mexico City is set up, very busy, very populated, very tight. In the satellite photos of Mexico City, you can point out a few interesting things, like one being the different class of people. Some people have landscapes, while other people just have neighbors that live close enough to shake hands with through windows. Something like this goes to show who has money, who does not. You can definitely see grid type patterns in the way housing was built, it appears as if geometry took some play in the shape of the city. The one thing that caught my eye on the satellite map and I find very cool, is the red line of canopies from ambulantes (street vendors). 

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What makes geography grads the most employable?

What makes geography grads the most employable? | Social Studies | Scoop.it
We asked our experts why they thought geography and psychology graduates were found to be least likely to be unemployed

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 29, 2014 11:23 AM

Some studies have shown that geography graduates are some of the least likely to be unemployed...what makes geography majors so employable?  The mix of skills without one career track makes geography majors able to land on their feet in a shifting economic landscape.  If you wondering about job possibilities for geography majors, here is a list designed to answer the question, "what can I do with a geography degree?"  More than you might think. 

steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 2014 4:04 AM

Why study geography ? This is why

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The End of the ‘Developing World’

The End of the ‘Developing World’ | Social Studies | Scoop.it
The old labels no longer apply. Rich countries need to learn from poor ones.

 

BILL GATES, in his foundation’s annual letter, declared that “the terms ‘developing countries’ and ‘developed countries’ have outlived their usefulness.” He’s right. If we want to understand the modern global economy, we need a better vocabulary.

Mr. Gates was making a point about improvements in income and gross domestic product; unfortunately, these formal measures generate categories that tend to obscure obvious distinctions. Only when employing a crude “development” binary could anyone lump Mozambique and Mexico together.

It’s tough to pick a satisfying replacement. Talk of first, second and third worlds is passé, and it’s hard to bear the Dickensian awkwardness of “industrialized nations.” Forget, too, the more recent jargon about the “global south” and “global north.” It makes little sense to counterpose poor countries with “the West” when many of the biggest economic success stories in the past few decades have come from the East.

All of these antiquated terms imply that any given country is “developing” toward something, and that there is only one way to get there.

It’s time that we start describing the world as “fat” or “lean.”


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joanne Wegener's curator insight, March 7, 2014 5:03 AM

Fat or Lean - what sort of world do we live in

An interesting discussion on the way we perceive and label the world.

Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 11, 2014 10:15 AM

Hoy en día poca claridad de dónde exactamente queda y quiénes son? 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:46 AM

UPDATE: this article (from the Atlantic) on the exact same concept would supplement the NY Times article nicely.  

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global Perceptions of the United States

Global Perceptions of the United States | Social Studies | Scoop.it
Placeholder for the Pew Global Indicators Database

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, February 22, 2014 12:18 AM

Images...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 4:25 PM

Kenya is measure as a parter and alliance with the United States for instance, in the Fall of 2009 a report came out and it proved taht 89% thought of Kenya as an alliance. Shockingly enough in 2013 the alliance with Africa drew at a small decrease of 79%.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:05 PM

APHG-U1 & U3

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Infant Mortality Rates

Infant Mortality Rates | Social Studies | Scoop.it
Are All Mothers Created Equal? From the State of the World's Mothers 2012 report see how mothers locations have an impact on the life and death of their children.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States

Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States | Social Studies | Scoop.it

"The Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond has created an enhanced version of the Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, which was published in 1932. The atlas, which took dozens of researchers to assemble, used maps to illustrate a variety of political, demographic and economic concepts."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, January 17, 2014 9:37 AM

Muy buen material!

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, January 21, 2014 11:24 AM

Atlas de la geografíia histórica de Estados Unidos.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:33 PM

Okay, this is actually pretty cool. The atlas is huge and has tons of information within it. No wonder there were tons of helping hands who created this map(s) of insightful looks at demographic and political debate.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How people in Muslim countries prefer women to dress in public

How people in Muslim countries prefer women to dress in public | Social Studies | Scoop.it
Even as publics in many of the surveyed Muslim-majority countries express a clear preference for women to dress conservatively, many also say women should be able to decide for themselves what to wear.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
mjonesED's curator insight, January 18, 2014 5:02 PM

For our colleagues who might be traveling in the middle east.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:57 PM

I am not sure if it is because I am an independently raised western woman but this whole article seems to completely address women as property.  I realize that some countries are much stricter than others but it is not something I can comprehend.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 7:09 PM

It appears our friends in Saudi Arabia like their women to be almost completely hidden from view with 74% claiming that the most appropriate dress is to have no more than the eyes showing while in public. Pakistan is the second most tolerant at a distant 35%. Overall, the most popular "form" for women in public is to show the facial region only with 44% of countries surveyed agreeing. On the other end of the spectrum is Lebanon who think that women with no head dress is appropriate nearly half the time. Turkey is in second with 32% believing that this is okay.

Put another way, Lebanon thinks it is okay for their women to dress with no head dress by a 15-1 ratio over the Saudi's. Unbelievable that I am writing about this in the year 2015. The Middle East should allow more than the middle of their women's face to be shown. Lebanon seems to be the most tolerant, let's hope the rest of the countries can follow their lead.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

9 questions about South Sudan you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about South Sudan you were too embarrassed to ask | Social Studies | Scoop.it

"South Sudan's crisis began just two weeks ago, on Dec. 15, and it already has observers warning that it could lead to civil war. Fighting has killed an estimated 1,000 people and sent 121,600 fleeing from their homes. International peacekeepers are preparing for the worst; some have been killed and a number of them, including four U.S. troops, have been injured.  What's happening in South Sudan is complicated and can be difficult to follow; understanding how it got to be this way can be even tougher. Here, then, are the most basic answers to your most basic questions. First, a disclaimer: This is not an exhaustive or definitive account of South Sudan and its history -- just some background, written so that anyone can understand it."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brien Shanahan's curator insight, January 5, 2014 5:30 PM

Sad what's going in South Sudan but worth learning about it.

Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:50 AM

New countries rarely establish themselves without a trying conflict or struggle in their infancy. I always like this simplified articles which introduce the latest conflict to people who are unaware. Ethnic groups are fluid in their importance throughout the world. It wasn't long ago on the historical scale that Irish Americans and British Americans were at odds, despite us in the US rarely considering that today. Ethnic conflict never ceases completely, but shifts targets depending on the politics of the time.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:39 PM

Without the big bad north to be their common enemy, the two ethnic groups in South Sudan are now fighting each other. In places like these with such limited resources there will always be internal conflicts

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping Density in the U.S.

Mapping Density in the U.S. | Social Studies | Scoop.it
Population density in the US varies wildly from place to place.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bridgitte's curator insight, March 2, 9:22 AM

I thought I shared this map or something very similiar a while back in 2013 when it was widely being shared but I couldn't find it.  Many countries have highly concentrated population distributions (like Canada and Australia) and the United States has pockets of extreme density interspersed throughout the country.  On the flip side, vast swaths of the countries are considered empty in terms of population such as this map that shows 1% of the total U.S. population in 42% of the area. and this one of the world that shows uneven patterns.

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.

Jacob Clauson's curator insight, March 3, 8:31 AM

I thought I shared this map or something very similiar a while back in 2013 when it was widely being shared but I couldn't find it.  Many countries have highly concentrated population distributions (like Canada and Australia) and the United States has pockets of extreme density interspersed throughout the country.  On the flip side, vast swaths of the countries are considered empty in terms of population such as this map that shows 1% of the total U.S. population in 42% of the area. and this one of the world that shows uneven patterns.

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.

Dewayne Goad's curator insight, March 9, 9:42 AM

I thought I shared this map or something very similiar a while back in 2013 when it was widely being shared but I couldn't find it.  Many countries have highly concentrated population distributions (like Canada and Australia) and the United States has pockets of extreme density interspersed throughout the country.  On the flip side, vast swaths of the countries are considered empty in terms of population such as this map that shows 1% of the total U.S. population in 42% of the area. and this one of the world that shows uneven patterns.

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Teaching Psychology
Scoop.it!

The Ultimate Guide to Note Taking in Class - Infographic

The Ultimate Guide to Note Taking in Class - Infographic | Social Studies | Scoop.it
The Ultimate Guide to Note Taking in Class Infographic lists some of the ways that can help students take better notes in class.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, PsychoPlum
more...
RebeccaMoore's curator insight, April 19, 2015 6:52 PM

Three strategies for effective note-taking with examples, pros and cons, and tips

Michael Westwood's curator insight, April 23, 2015 5:37 PM

The "Pen vs. Keyboard" seems a bit questionable, but otherwise a potentially useful way to introduce this topic to students.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Teaching history and archaeology to kids
Scoop.it!

These Are The World's Oldest Trousers

These Are The World's Oldest Trousers | Social Studies | Scoop.it
3,000 year-old horsemen had style!

Via David Connolly, Louise Zarmati
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

14 Mind-Blowing Facts That Will Completely Change Your Perception Of Time

14 Mind-Blowing Facts That Will Completely Change Your Perception Of Time | Social Studies | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 2, 2014 7:34 PM

This isn't the most academic source, but these 14 examples are sure-fire ways to get students interested and thinking.  8 of them can from this list on the Huffington Post

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | Social Studies | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
steve smith's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 26, 2014 6:57 PM

Regional patterns?

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 2014 9:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.  

 

 

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | Social Studies | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 2014 4:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia

Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia | Social Studies | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2014 9:32 AM

This StoryMap from ESRI is a nice way to explore the current events in Crimea and this set of maps from National Geographic shows the historical geography of the region.   This issue has many inter-regional connections as well.  Many residents of former Soviet Republics are nervous seeing Russia's aggressive political strategy;  Moscow's previously similar foreign policy that aligned with Beijing's interests are now diverging

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geo-Literacy

Geo-Literacy | Social Studies | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Richardson's comment, February 28, 2014 7:00 AM
I also appreciate the sentiment here, but as a geography teacher in high school I also find that students are missing very basic information about the world as it is right now. For example, many of my students can't identify more than about three countries in Africa, and I've had students in the past who could not even find the U.S. on a map. Now I force them to take the dreaded 'blank map' quizzes of the world. Its distressing, but it needs to be done. Interestingly, many of my lower level students like these types of tests because there are online games that teach them the locations in a fun way, and also because it is a very literal task. The ones who struggle with higher level material can at least succeed at this if they study.
PIRatE Lab's comment, February 28, 2014 11:16 AM
Yes, as Seth and several commenters have said, we need both. And too often my students don't seem to know the basic facts/history of a particular situation. You must know where you are coming from if you ever want to get to somewhere new.
SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 8:11 AM

Excellent resource about the importance of Geography in understanding the world of the 21st Century.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

See the First Photographs Ever Taken of Jerusalem

See the First Photographs Ever Taken of Jerusalem | Social Studies | Scoop.it

"Few places in the world are as revered, fought over and thought about as Jerusalem. For millenia, people have made pilgrimages here, often at great expense and great risk. So imagine for a second what it would be like to hear, from a young age, about this holy city, and then to see the first photographs ever taken of it."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 8, 2014 12:26 PM
proche et moyen orient: une ville enjeu capital depuis longtemps...
Tony Hall's curator insight, February 26, 2014 8:25 PM

I love seeing old photographs. Although these are blurry they are amazing images. 

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask | Social Studies | Scoop.it

Watch a video that explains Ukraine's crisis in two minutes or read this quick article that covers the same material.  

 

Ukrainians have been protesting since Nov. 21, when President Viktor Yanukovych rejected a deal for closer integration with the European Union, instead drawing the country closer to Russia. They are still in the streets in huge numbers and have seized regional government buildings in several parts of the country. In Kiev, the capital, clashes between protesters and security forces have become violent, killing several people. On Tuesday, the prime minister resigned. No one is quite sure what will happen next.

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 5:50 PM

This article does a good job of explaining some of the many aspects of the current crisis in the Ukraine. While the media has been covering this conflict it has done little to provide background information on the Ukraine and precisely why Russia has invaded. This article goes into enough detail to flesh out the conflict without becoming in accessible to the average reader.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:58 PM

Ukrainians have been protesting since Nov. 21, when President Viktor Yanukovych rejected a deal for closer integration with the European Union, instead drawing the country closer to Russia. They are still in the streets in huge numbers and have seized regional government buildings in several parts of the country. In the capital, clashes between protesters and security forces have become violent, killing several people. Recently, the prime minister resigned. No one is quite sure what will happen next. What's happening in Ukraine is really important, but it can also be confusing and difficult to follow for outsiders who don't know the history that led up to. Here are some basic questions that have basic answers for people who are still confused. What is Ukraine? Why are so many people protesting? How did Ukraine get so divided? What role does Russia play and why do they care so much? Why haven't the United States or Europe helped? But most important, the question we all want to know the answer to is what is going to happen next?

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 3:01 PM

Such a helpful article, especially for people like me who don't like to look like an idiot.  This was so informative in a way that condensed the big issue into one short article that covered every aspect and made it easy to understand.  I knew there was something going on in Ukraine but didn't really know what it was, so this was awesome.  However, this is a real issue that people need to be aware of, especially when thinking, "well why doesn't the west just step in?" because that seems to be what we do everywhere else.  However, I think we've pretty much proven that stepping in can sometimes do more harm than good.  And honestly, it is not our problem to solve.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Social Studies | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:39 PM

 On map 33, it shows the religious borders map of the different religions that are occupying certain areas of the Middle East. The area of Baghdad and east is mostly Shiite Islam and west of Baghdad is Sunni Islam. What I found to be most interesting is that even though Jerusalem is surrounded by many different religions they still celebrate Judaism. They are religiously protected by its borders. There is some sign of Sunni Islam being practices within their borders but it is mostly dominated by Judaism. 

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Walled World

Walled World | Social Studies | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:53 PM

The video attached to this article reminded me made me think "racism". It is not Americas first time targeting one cultural group and antagonizing them. We did it to the Indians, Jews, at one time we denied Chinese immigrants the right to enter the country or become a citizen. The projection of walls in my opinion only creates more room for crime. I would love to research what benefits its had. I think the world is lacking the understand that people are people .period. This segregation and division is so unnecessary and creates wars, tension, hostility, and divide.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:41 AM

the social impact is we do not get to mingle with people of different culture, religion, ethnicity. Economically businesses do not grow at least on the small business side. There is no chance of growth. what about population once again if you stay with in a section divided by walls then the population stays within. a society would have to stay above the 2.06 fertility rate to keep their population stable.