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Social Studies 7 Resources
Resources for Social Studies 7
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Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | Social Studies 7 Resources | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


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Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 5, 2013 10:21 PM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:28 PM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

This is from 'worldmapper' - it is a great sight to help you understand using technology the most densely populated areas of various countries. What do you think they are? 

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Back to School with Google Earth

Back to School with Google Earth | Social Studies 7 Resources | Scoop.it
Amazing things about Google Earth - news, features, tips, technology, and applications...

 

If you've never seen the Google Earth Blog, this post is a good primer to the educational possibilities that this technology opens up to teachers.  It is not just for geography teachers; it can be a visualization tool for any subject that has real-world applications that take place somewhere. 


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Lindsey Robinson's comment, August 27, 2012 5:22 PM
Google Earth is an amazing way to teach children of all ages (and adults for that matter) about the geography of the Earth. It is such an abstract way of conveying geographic concepts. What an amazing teaching tool....and as an added bonus, it's FREE!!
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Soda vs. Pop with Twitter

Soda vs. Pop with Twitter | Social Studies 7 Resources | Scoop.it
One of the great things about Twitter is that it’s a global conversation anyone can join anytime. Eavesdropping on the world, what what!

 

While many educators have been using http://popvssoda.com/ to show the linguistic regions in the United States, this is a similar map, with the added social media component.  To map out these regions, the cartographer used the word choice on geo-tagged tweets as the data source.  For another twitter, map, the following link shows which regions are most actively engaged on Twitter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/top-countries-on-twitter_n_1653915.html

What do these regions show us?  What types of regions are these?


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Chris W's comment, August 27, 2012 11:02 AM
This is a really cool use of twitter! I use the term soda, which most of the northeast uses as well.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:35 PM
Twitter is something that is becoming widely used, and is something I usually check everyday. I never really thought of twitter beyond advertising and communicating. It is amazing the kind of data that can be extracted from peoples tweets. In the soda vs. pop argument I would say soda which makes sense since the data shows that people in the Northeast refer to it as soda. Twitter is so current that you can actually get some current and accurate data just from reading the hash tags in peoples tweets. It's amazing that such information can be extracted from all around the world.
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National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | Social Studies 7 Resources | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 11:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.
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Google Maps: 10 Handy Tricks You Should Know

Google Maps: 10 Handy Tricks You Should Know | Social Studies 7 Resources | Scoop.it
Google Maps is a fantastic free tool, but we’re guessing you don’t have much spare time to play around with the service. Let us help.

 

Even if you use Google Maps just for personal use, these are basic enough of tips that all users should be able to use. 


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Where Farmers Live and Which Countries Don’t Have Enough

Where Farmers Live and Which Countries Don’t Have Enough | Social Studies 7 Resources | Scoop.it
Read more from Slate’s special issue on the future of food. Which counties, states, and countries have the biggest stake in food and its future? Look to these three maps to find out.

 

Where do most farmers live?  Which countries feed the world?  Which states produce the highest crop value per capita?  This series of interactive maps with data at a variety of scales will allow students to explore these questions.  What to understand the spatial patterns of food production and the geographic factors behind agricultural variation?  They are ripe for the picking. 


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OverlapMaps - compare any two places

OverlapMaps - compare any two places | Social Studies 7 Resources | Scoop.it
An OverlapMap is a map of one part of the world that overlaps a different part of the world. OverlapMaps show relative size.

 

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is an very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper.  


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Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:07 PM
This toll will and can provide a reliable mapping source to geographers everywhere. It is useful and fun. A neat way to learn cartography
Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 11:31 PM
The OverlapMap is a very useful tool that will allow a user to compare different places and parts of the world. Having a more accurate size of a place is critical when comparing 2 or more places. I think that many users besides me will find this very convenient when other resources are not available.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 11:48 PM

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is a very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper.