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What medieval Europe did with its teenagers

What medieval Europe did with its teenagers | Social Sciences | Scoop.it

"Today, there's often a perception that Asian children are given a hard time by their parents. But a few hundred years ago northern Europe took a particularly harsh line, sending children away to live and work in someone else's home. Not surprisingly, the children didn't always like it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 24, 2014 11:10 AM

Just a reminder for students today that they live in a good time and place for educational opportunities and personal liberties.  

Arlis Groves's curator insight, March 26, 2014 12:05 AM

Young folks today may be surprised to learn that, had they been born a few hundred years ago in Medieval Europe, they might well be working for another family through their teenaged years.

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We Are Happy From...

We Are Happy From... | Social Sciences | Scoop.it
As a token of gratitude to Pharrell Williams , Clément Durou & Pierre Dupaquier for their worldwide contagious happiness...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2014 9:22 PM

Be happy...and spread the joy.

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▶ Countries inside Countries: Bizarre Borders


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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, May 18, 2014 2:52 PM

Talk about landlocked!  How would you form policy for a country that is completely surrounded by another country?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:02 PM

APHG-U4

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:30 PM

nature, meaning, and function of boundaries - The most common boundaries are nation's borders. This video shows many landlocked or mostly surrounded states, that don't decisive as much freedom as states with many neighbors or open borders. These surrounded states value their borders and boundaries, because even if they are smaller or do not have as much freedom, they have their own state that they rule that is all theirs. The function of these borders as boundaries are to mark the edges of their state and to keep other states out.

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Understanding The Crisis In Ukraine

Understanding The Crisis In Ukraine | Social Sciences | Scoop.it
Tensions are running high between Ukraine and Russia following the ouster of Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych and the invasion of Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula by Russian forces.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 2014 9:06 PM

The Onion can certainly deliver...this is a mixture of geopolitical humor and a pithy spoof of the new internet reporting style.  They also poke fun at American ignorance/apathy towards foreign affairs in this additional article.  These issues in Ukraine are no laughing matter, but for some like Seinfeld, that's a natural way to deal the issue.

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Social Sciences | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | Social Sciences | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 


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steve smith's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 26, 2014 6:57 PM

Regional patterns?

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 2014 9:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.  

 

 

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Habits of the World's Wealthiest People

Habits of the World's Wealthiest People | Social Sciences | Scoop.it

Infographic Showing Habits of the World’s Wealthiest People Share:TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogleEmailMoreDiggRedditTumblrStumbleUpon http://www.grahamjones.co.uk/2014/multimedia/infographics/habits-worlds-wealthiest-people.html


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A 1940s Board Game for French Kids Taught Tactics for Successful Colonialism

A 1940s Board Game for French Kids Taught Tactics for Successful Colonialism | Social Sciences | Scoop.it
Published in 1941, this “Trading Game: France—Colonies” aimed to teach French children the basics of colonial management. 

 

Players drew cards corresponding to colony names, then had to deploy cards representing assets like boats, engineers, colonists, schools, and equipment, in order to win cards representing the exports of the various colonies.  “Images on the game,” Getty Research Institute curator Isotta Poggi writes in her blog post on the document, “provide a vivid picture of the vast variety of resources, including animals, plants, and minerals, that the colonies provided to France.” Cartoons on the cards depict coal (mined by a figure clearly intended to be a “native”), rubber, wood, and even wild animals.


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Russia says it will build bridge to Crimea

Russia says it will build bridge to Crimea | Social Sciences | Scoop.it
MOSCOW (Reuters) - Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said on Monday that Russia would press ahead with plans to build bridge linking Russia directly with Ukraine's Crimea region, which Moscow has wrested

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 2014 3:39 PM

This bridge had been discussed previously would now be a critical lifeline to Russia (depending on how serious Russia is about separating Crimea from Ukraine permanently). 


Albert Jordan's curator insight, March 6, 2014 1:46 PM

This makes sense considering the significant interests Russia has in the area. Without this bridge, Russia is required to either go over water, through the air, or through Ukraine to get to their military bases in the Crimean region. With the recent occupation of the Crimea, Russia's interest in this area is only more evident. Russia has a vested interest in not only the Crimean region but in all of Ukraine due to a large network of oil pipelines that feeds Europe its needs. While territorially, Russia may only be interested in the Crimean peninsula, politically they will have a major interest in keeping Ukraine close. Having this bridge link Russia proper to the Crimean allows for increased freedom of movement for Russian citizens as well as military or industrial goods. While a military confrontation between Russia and the West is hopefully unlikely, combined with the fact that it seems many in Ukraine were prefer to be a part of the EU, Russia will probably not absorb Ukraine into its sphere of influence but that does not mean Russia will not force the West into allowing it free reign to do as it pleases in the Crimea region. 

 

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An Atlas of Poverty

An Atlas of Poverty | Social Sciences | Scoop.it
We think we know what poverty looks like. But how do we accurately account for it? How do we know where to look?
Poverty maps are one place to begin. Technological advances of the past decade—the increased capability to both collect and process improved data—make it possible to reveal the face of the poor in finer detail than ever before. By translating data into the visual accessibility of a map, we can locate poverty more precisely, understand its sources more comprehensively—and attack it more effectively. Such maps can even be used to monitor the results of anti-poverty efforts. Poverty maps can be part of a strong, new foundation for building and tailoring policies and programs, to reach those people that will benefit the most.
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 9, 2014 8:27 PM

This is very revealing

Sieg Holle's curator insight, March 10, 2014 9:10 PM

solutions anyone......