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Why You Need To Curate Content and How To Be A Master At It

Why You Need To Curate Content and How To Be A Master At It | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

 

This is a great piece by Heidi Cohen on why your marketing needs content curation and 12 attributes of a successful curation strategy.  This is one of the best articles I've seen on this topic in a very long time.

 

As I said, I've seen many pieces on curation but if you're like me, everytime I read about this, I always find something new or am reminded of ways I can polish what I'm doing.

 

Here are some of the highlights.........

 

Intro:

 

Why Your Marketing Needs Content Curation

 

At its core, content curation is like a great editor or blogger who brings his unique taste and understanding of his target audience to his selection of the best content for his readers.


**He provides context for the content so that it's more than a collection of information


3 Reasons your content marketing strategy needs content curation:


1. Offering your audience a combination of original and third party content provides a branded context for your work


2. Curating other people's content positions you and/or your organization as a tastemaker in your field


3. Creating sufficient content is a marketing and business challenge


12 Attributes of a successful content curation strategy:


Here are a few things that caught my attention:


 *Has defined measurable goals


As part of your content marketing strategy and by extension

your marketing plan, content curation needs objectives that

are associated with your business.


**Targets a specific audience


. *Content curation like other forms of content marketing requires

understanding your readers' marketing persona

 

** Involves a community

 

*As with any social media or content marketing, your

audience should be at the heart of your content efforts.

 

**Clay Shirky says it best:

 

"Curation comes up when people

realize that it isn't just about information seeking, it's also

about synchronizing a community"


Selected and reviewed by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/SpJEfQ}


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Joe Winpisinger's comment, January 26, 2013 11:31 PM
I see that you are making some of these into almost like blog posts too. Jan Gordon does the same thing. I think I am going to try it out...
Christian Forthomme's curator insight, June 20, 2013 12:32 AM

Very good summary of what's needed in content curation. 

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Content and the Ripple Effect of Shiny-Object Syndrome

Content and the Ripple Effect of Shiny-Object Syndrome | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Ardath Albee, I selected it because I thought her insights were very helpful for anyone who is using content marketing to reach their customers. Her suggestions are good for original and curated content.

 

To paraphrase:

 

Everything has changed, B2B executives need to change their mindset to fit the realities of the "always connected consumer" They are bombarded with too much information. It's important to shift your thinking and change the way you relate to them. The old way won't work.

 

Excerpt:

 

"Selling content marketing to B2B executives is hard. At least harder than it should be. But what strikes me as odd is their willingness to requestion their decision after they've finally been convinced".

 

Here are some highlights:

 

**Content marketing is not a campaign  With no stop date, it violates the nature of traditionalist marketers to be able to box in a final result and say "it worked"

 

or "it could have been better." At least not quickly

 

**content marketing isn't three touches and a sales pitch, your department may not be shuffling as many leads to sales.

 

**If the change we make isn't driven by what our buyers want, it's driven by what we want. What we want isn't going to convince buyers to buy. Especially over the longer-term, complex buying process.

 

**Here is two things to do to combat Shiny Object Syndrome:

 

First - determine ways to measure your incremental wins with content marketing that tie to business KPIs. That's one thing that marketing automation technology and analytics can help you with.

 

It's also something that salespeople can help you with. When's the last time you spoke with them about the leads you sent over?

 

Here are more insights from Matt Johnson who  has more to say about KPI's

 

"Only by compartmentalizing our distinct lives as brand stewards, lead generators and media mavens, can we help educate others (CEOs, peers, our teams, ourselves), who may think of “marketing” as a monolithic and mysterious blob......

 

Second - put some fun into your content marketing!

 

**Take a look at your personas and figure out a new way to approach them. Put a new spin on a topic you've grown bored with

 

**Use a new format. Do it to engage yourself as much as you do it to engage your buyers.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Marketing, Social Media and Beyond"

 

See full article here: [http://tinyurl.com/73xam22]


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Content Curation: What it is and Why it's So Hot!

Content Curation: What it is and Why it's So Hot! | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

This piece came to my attention by Judy Gombita  who shared it on Google+. It was written by Bob Geller and it's one of the best articles on content curation that I have seen in a long time.

 

Here are some highlights:

 

**Blow Out Content Marketing and Lead Social Conversations with Content Curation...

 

Great tips for Effective Content Curation

 

**Great content curation is part science and art.

 

**To do a good job, you need to have an understanding of your market space and how to make best use of the search and publishing tools.

 

**It requires a keen eye and instinct for topics that align with the expertise of executives, brand attributes and customer interests.

 

Tom Riddle, CEO of CIThread, a hosted content curation platform, says

 

"great content curation happens when three elements come together:

 

**SME - subject matter expertise 

 

**a focused objective and a strong voice in response to an article

 

**tweet or post that happens to be at the nexus of your expertise and the objective. If this happens, you will find yourself writing the right words.

 

Takeaways:

 

**if you are in marketing, you should care about content curation because it just works!

 

**There are a range of tools, as you will see, that can help you transcend casual efforts to help boost organizational social media and content marketing efforts.

 

**Content curation gives marketing and social media teams the tools they need to turbo charge social media publishing and engagement efforts; it is an increasingly critical function, and an area that should be understood and mastered.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here [http://bit.ly/GM2tmg]

 


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Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More

Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

This is a great tool for curators!

 

Intro:

 

"With a Web full of stuff, discovery is a hard problem. Search engines were the first tools on the scene, but their rankings still have a hard time identifying relevance the same way a human user would."

 

Excerpt:

 

Digging For Content

 

Thoora was founded in 2008, and it originally launched as a real-time news aggregator, which we covered back in 2009. But this new iteration is about much more than scanning the news.

 

This is a toolkit for users to explore and research topics, and it learns more about them as its users sort out what matters to them. It is a social tool - users can share topics, and the Thoora site features highlights - but the purpose of the tool is to turn up the most relevant content on the topic, no matter how deeply it's buried in the Web.

 

"We like to say that we're at the intersection of aggregation, curation and search," says Carrie Shaw, head of product at Thoora. As far as users are concerned, that's a good description, but the real value of Thoora comes from the learning algorithms at work behind the scenes. As users create topics, discover content and clean up the results, the Thoora engine gets better at recommendations.

 

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/thoora.php


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5 Best Practices Every Content Curator Should Follow

5 Best Practices Every Content Curator Should Follow | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

I selected this piece by Steve Rosenbaum for Mashable because there are some excellent tips to make you a trusted source, build a loyal following and add value to the community.

 

I don't know about you but everytime I read a post about curation, I see something different, this one is from someone who knows what he's talking about.

 

Here are some highlights:

 

Be part of the content ecosystem

 

**What a curator should do is embrace content both as a marketer and an organizer

 

Follow a schedule

 

**No matter what and how much you post, 2 new links a day and one big post per week, that's a schedule

 

**Be consistent and post at the same time everyday so your readers will know when to expect new content

 

**consistency and regularity brings new users and helps you build a loyal fan base

 

Embrace multi platforms

 

**Put your work where your audience is, today you have to go to them (more about this in the article)

 

Engage and Participate

 

**Select only the best content - read everything before you hit the send button - you'll build trust by helping your readers find great content and information

 

**This is a great way to build relationships with bloggers and other curators (more on this in the article)

 

Share, Don't Steal

 

**Last but definitely not least, you must acknowledge the source, there are no exceptions

 

**When people choose to listen to you, it's because you've proven to separate the signal from the noise

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://on.mash.to/Jk8uWH]


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janlgordon's comment, April 29, 2012 6:06 PM
Hi John, It's funny, we can read these articles over and over but I always find something new each time I read them. How about you?
John van den Brink's comment, April 30, 2012 2:50 AM
Hi Jan, correct. Everytime I think "oh, I know already" But when I read the article I always find one or two things that I didn't knew already :)
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The Key Role Of Quality Curation in the Future of Media

The Key Role Of Quality Curation in the Future of Media | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

In his recent business trip to Australia, Edelman’s Steve Rubel discussed his thoughts on the future of the media with Yvonne Adele at Social Media Club Melbourne.

 

 

 

 

Here are some highlights from this article:

 

*** Content surplus as a bankable trend:

In an era of self-publication (for brands as well as individuals) and increased noise we’re all faced with the problem of too much content and not enough time. For media companies, scaling this information and providing value through quality curation is a great opportunity to solve this problem for the consumer.

 

Steve’s top tips for being a quality curator:

- Be knowledgeable and well read on your subject matter of choice;
- Save materials for later reading – it’s all an opportunity to be well informed and provide value to others;
- Focus on depth, not breadth. As Steve said, he knows a lot about a few things, and little about most things.

 

***People want to connect with the human element of a brand and those that work for the organisation.

 

***Journalists and media are now community managers. They have to see their role not only as a reporter/journalist/presenter – but as a brand ambassador who is able to acquire consumers and an build an audience through these channels.

 

***Steve’s top three emerging trends for media?

1) Building business models that incorporate curation;
2) Increased data mining and analytics about real-time engagement with media content;
3) The increased importance of facebook’s open graph.

 

Read full article http://j.mp/H17F45

 

Moreover, Steve Rubel also moderated a News Limited and Herald Sun panel on the future of journalism. 

If you have an hour to spare, I highly recommend checking out the full hour-long video discussion here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSRhDqeBtmg


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Is it Curation or Noise Generation - Do You Know the Difference?

Is it Curation or Noise Generation - Do You Know the Difference? | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

This article was written by Amber Naslund and curated by Robin Good. They have both done an excellent job. Curation is evolving and there are some things that we absolutely know to be true but the author has also left us with some great questions, definitely something to ponder.

 

Robin Good: Amber Naslund, at Brass Tack Thinking blog, has a great article touching on the importance of curation and on the danger of easily selling personal self-expression and serendipitous re-sharing of other people's content with true content curation.

 

An she is so damn right about this.

 

 

Here a few key highlights from her article:

 

" 1) To me – and by definition – curation requires conscious thought with the purpose of adding value, context, or perspective to a collection of things.

 

It’s deliberate work, gathering things together for a reason and lending a keen editing eye to those assets, whether it be pieces of art or pieces of writing.

 

...

 

2) Turning your Twitter feed into a clockwork-scheduled stream of all the stuff you find in your RSS feed is not curation, it’s distribution.

 

And since collecting and redistributing content is arguably easier than creating it, everyone does it.

 

Which serves to create a great deal of noise, and as we’ve lamented for some time now, it becomes increasingly difficult to separate the wheat from the chaff and home in on information resources that are consistently valuable, and favor mindful selection and sharing over optimizing a feed to populate a bunch of links and drive traffic or gain fans and followers.

 

 

3) Can curation be accomplished online? I think so.

 

But it’s rarely what we actually see happening when we immerse ourselves in social networks, and it’s not what we’re doing when we click the “share” button over and over again.

 

...

 

4) The business case for curating content has long been that you can become an expert resource for others, a trusted source of information or expertise that sets you apart.

 

But becoming a trusted source of information implies a willingness and ability to apply filters, to have exacting standards, to discern the good from the simply popular, the valuable from the gimmicked and hyped.

 

Which requires work. A lot of it.

 

Not just an app and the ability to put your collection and distribution on autopilot."

 

 hank you Amber, you are so damn right. 

 

Here's what caught my attention - food for thought for all of us:

 

 **How do we preserve the value of some content over other content?

 

**Is there value in having to work a bit to find the good stuff, or is greasing the skids for the flow of content always the best possible scenario?

 

**If everyone is a curator or a distributor, how must our tools and thinking continue to evolve to help us find the curators of the curators?

 

**How do we continue to evolve our valuation of resources and information?

 

 Insightful. 9/10


Full article: http://www.brasstackthinking.com/2012/02/curation-saturation-and-why-we-might-need-information-friction-after-all/  

 

(Image credit: http://Streetfilms.org


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Marc Lucas's comment, February 17, 2012 12:47 AM
Guilty as charged, I should know better, I preach from the gospel of adding value! Thank you for the nudge towards addressing my own case of "builders' syndrome" (Customers get great new extensions, kitchen refits and bedroom refurbishments but Chez Builder remains in sore need of some redecorating, new gutters and more!). Thanks, Robin.
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Make Your Audience Your Newsroom: Civicboom

Make Your Audience Your Newsroom: Civicboom | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

"Civicboom is an online platform designed to facilitate content-driven organizations and individuals to work together in generating rich media content.

 

Content-seekers can place a request for specific content. Then, by using the Civicboom mobile app (Android), or by uploading to the plug & go site, a content-creator can respond with rich-media directly to that request.

 

All incoming rich-media content is then managed by the content-seeker, and directed to a customizable plugin to be embedded on a website."

Read more about it here: http://thenextweb.com/media/2011/11/12/civicboom-this-open-platform-lets-organizations-request-content-from-their-audience/

 

Sign-up here:  https://www.civicboom.com/

 


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janlgordon's comment, November 15, 2011 4:28 PM
This is great Robin!
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Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More

Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

This is a great tool for curators!

 

Intro:

 

"With a Web full of stuff, discovery is a hard problem. Search engines were the first tools on the scene, but their rankings still have a hard time identifying relevance the same way a human user would."

 

Excerpt:

 

Digging For Content

 

Thoora was founded in 2008, and it originally launched as a real-time news aggregator, which we covered back in 2009. But this new iteration is about much more than scanning the news.

 

This is a toolkit for users to explore and research topics, and it learns more about them as its users sort out what matters to them. It is a social tool - users can share topics, and the Thoora site features highlights - but the purpose of the tool is to turn up the most relevant content on the topic, no matter how deeply it's buried in the Web.

 

"We like to say that we're at the intersection of aggregation, curation and search," says Carrie Shaw, head of product at Thoora. As far as users are concerned, that's a good description, but the real value of Thoora comes from the learning algorithms at work behind the scenes. As users create topics, discover content and clean up the results, the Thoora engine gets better at recommendations.

 

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/thoora.php


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Curating People is As Important as Curating Content - Here's Why

Curating People is As Important as Curating Content - Here's Why | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

I curated and posted this a few months ago but feel it's relevant and timely today. (What brought this to mind was another important article written by Axel Schultze, which I have commented on below.

 

Here's what I said about Gideon Rosenblatt's post.

 

This is one of those gems that I love to share. It was written by Gideon Rosenblatt in response to an earlier article written by Eli Pariser, "The Filter Bubble", which is about the way algorithms (based on our personal searches) affect the results that are returned to us, as a result, we're not seeing the whole picture.

 

"Computer algorithms aren't the only thing contributing to the 'Internet Filter Bubble."

 

**In the world of the information networker, curating content is only half the game. The other half is curating the curators.

 

**In that power to choose our connections, rests our ultimate power to reshape our information filter bubbles and radically improve our perception of reality.

 

**Who we choose to connect with in our social networks deeply affects our ability to see a diversity of information.  

 

My takeaway from this is that whereas technology may restrict the results returned to us by search engines, the other, and perhaps more important half of the equation is controlled by us!  It is well documented that we are more likely to influenced by our circle of friends and associates than by anything else that we may find (or that may find us!). 

 

By effectively curating our circles of influence, we increase the value of this ever important means of discovery and therefore of our entire online experience. 

 

**This in turn can make us far more effective and informative consumers as well as curators, when we widen our own circles.

 

Great article by Axel Schultze CEO of xee.me

 

"Why SEO will Be Gone in 5 to 10 Years" as he talks about "Relationships and Recommendations Soon More Valuable Than SEO" (Robin Good)

 

Jan Gordon: "Here's what caught my attention:

 

Axel: As long as people search for a product not knowing their name or a technology, not knowing its source or a solution not knowing who is a potential supplier SEO is an important part of the marketing mix...

 

However, this is slowly and steadily changing.

 

**Today 60 – 80% of the so called educated purchase decision is based on recommendations by trusted individuals or groups that have no or no significant interest in the sale but helpful and experienced people using or knowing the product or service in need.

 

And the number of recommendation based purchases is steadily growing. I'm sure it will hit the 80 – 90% range in the next 5 to 10 years.

 

Now – what does that mean to SEO?

 

Why should a business invest in search engine optimization if most of the purchase decisions are based on recommendations?

 

Wouldn't it be smarter to invest into the "recommendation chain" instead in SEO?

 

Wouldn't it be more effective and successful to make sure people recommend a product than hoping to come up higher in the list of search results?"

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read the full article: http://bit.ly/AxRrEr

 

Via janlgordon

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Image by Istockphoto  from an article by Social Media Examiner

 

Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/AxRrEr]


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janlgordon's comment, March 15, 2012 8:05 PM
Gideon.Rosenblatt
You made my day! I always love reading and curating your articles this was definitely no exception. Thank you for always raising the bar and making us pay attention to what's really important.
janlgordon's comment, June 17, 2012 3:53 PM
Thank you for this Robin, it's greatly appreciated. It's exciting to watch and be a part of all this change, I'm sure you agree:-)
Robin Good's comment, June 18, 2012 2:28 AM
Yes Jan... I don't know exactly what you are referring to, but this the only sure thing we have today: this is time of fast and continuous change... so I am certainly enjoying the ride.

On another note: I would humbly suggest to consider posting shorter stories, especially when you are also pointing to the original, as what I am looking for from you, is not a rehash of what's in the article - outside of a 1-3 para excerpt - but the reasons why you are recommending it. You are already doing both, but it is overwhelming for me. Too much stuff, and I haven't even seen the original yet.

I would also gently mute some of the visual noise you create by heavily formatting with asterisks, bolds and big font sizes. In my case that doesn't help much. It actually hinders my ability to rapidly scan and check whether you have something good there.

I suggest to limit greatly the formatting options you use and to highlight only what is really relevant, because when too many things are highlighted, bolded, asterisked, none has any more an effect on me. It's like a crowd screaming: who do you help? :-)
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The Benefits of Content Curation and How to Make it Work for You

The Benefits of Content Curation and How to Make it Work for You | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

Beth Kanter wrote a very complete and interesting piece in NTEN's latest edition of their quarterly journal for non-profit leaders. You have to download the journal but it's worth it and it's free (you just need to register). 

 

Jan Gordon: I agree with Guillaume, Beth Kanter knows what she's talking about and her article is definitely worth reading.

 

Guillaume Decugis wrote this commentary:

 

"It's been fascinating for me to see how non-profits seem to embrace Social Media in general and Content Curation in particular - Beth of course being a key advocate in that move.

 

The broader take-away that I see for those of us in all sorts of organizations, as independant professionals or SMB-owners is the validation it brings to the model. When tightly-budgeted NPO's embrace a practice as a group, you can bet they're not wasting their scarce resources on a hype. They have to be efficient and as Beth puts it in the article: "Putting content curation into practice is part art form, part science, but mostly about daily practice. You don’t need to do it for hours, but 20 minutes every day will help you develop and hone the skills."

 

This is precisely where we see the opportunity with curation for professionals: building up a good practice that fits with one's daily routine and that -as Beth puts it - brings great "unexpected benefits".

 

Selected by gdecugis and Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://tinyurl.com/75ucphe]


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Guillaume Decugis's comment, June 13, 2012 12:28 AM
You're welcome Beth. Thanks for the great piece!
Mshaber's comment, June 13, 2012 1:51 PM
Thanks...
janlgordon's comment, June 14, 2012 10:09 AM
Thank you Beth Kanter for the mention and for an amazing article, it's greatly appreciated!
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Is Content Curation the New Community Builder?

Is Content Curation the New Community Builder? | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Eric Brown for social media explorer.

 

I selected this article because it reaffirms what many of us already know but it's still good to see this in writing: Content curation and Media Curation (a mix of  machine aggregation and Human Curation) are starting to pick up steam.

 

Here are some highlights:

 

Curation comes up when search stops working,” says author and NYU Professor Clay Shirky. But it’s more than a human-powered filter.

 

**“Curation comes up when people realize that it isn’t just about information seeking, it’s also about synchronizing a community.”

 

The author says and I agree with him:

 

 

**"The value will be in the expertise of the curator, people will not read junk, and the best of the best curators will create digital domination with vibrant communities".

 

There is also a great quote from Fred Wilson's AVB blog in which he details what he would do if he were starting the Village Voice now:

 

**I would not print anything. I would not hire a ton of writers. I would build a website and a mobile app (or two or three). I would hire a Publisher and a few salespeople.

 

**I would hire an editor and a few journalists. And then I’d go out and find every blog, twitter, facebook, flickr, youtube, and other social media feed out there that is related to downtown NYC

 

**and I would pull it all into an aggregation system where my editor and journalists could cull through the posts coming in, curate them, and then publish them

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article: [http://bit.ly/kmZvJg]

 


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Alessio Manca's comment, May 23, 2012 4:36 AM
What a truth! TY!!
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Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More

Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

This is a great tool for curators!

 

Intro:

 

"With a Web full of stuff, discovery is a hard problem. Search engines were the first tools on the scene, but their rankings still have a hard time identifying relevance the same way a human user would."

 

Excerpt:

 

Digging For Content

 

Thoora was founded in 2008, and it originally launched as a real-time news aggregator, which we covered back in 2009. But this new iteration is about much more than scanning the news.

 

This is a toolkit for users to explore and research topics, and it learns more about them as its users sort out what matters to them. It is a social tool - users can share topics, and the Thoora site features highlights - but the purpose of the tool is to turn up the most relevant content on the topic, no matter how deeply it's buried in the Web.

 

"We like to say that we're at the intersection of aggregation, curation and search," says Carrie Shaw, head of product at Thoora. As far as users are concerned, that's a good description, but the real value of Thoora comes from the learning algorithms at work behind the scenes. As users create topics, discover content and clean up the results, the Thoora engine gets better at recommendations.

 

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/thoora.php


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Content Curation In 45 Minutes A Day... And Free

Content Curation In 45 Minutes A Day... And Free | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

I’m sure a lot of you guys have looked into curation software available ...

Obviously with the radically different price points they all do different things, but here’s the gist – a whole lot of this you can do for free.

 

Step One – Define your Parameters

Define your parameters by where you want the goods to go. Make sure everything is accessible from the beginning so you can leverage your curated content efficiently from the start.


Step Two – Choose your Weapons

e.g. Timely.is; G+ and FB

 

Step Three – Be Intentional with your Schedule

I can’t speak to your industry/niche but I can tell you that when I do my curation at somewhere between 6 and 8am EST I find a goldmine of posts that are brand-flipping-new

 

Step Four – Be Crazy Time Sensitive

I make sure to only curate content that is timely [less than 1% of the time curate something more than 24 hours old]

Open up a google search and type in “content marketing” at the beginning of my day, and set it to the last 24 hours.

 

Step Five – Be Consistent

As long as you are curating the same general stuff over and over it will work for you.


Notice: Steps 1-5 are all about the setup or protocol. Steps 6-9 are the actual daily work.

 

Step Six – Prepare for Battle

Open windows to the following places:

Google search
Timely.is
WP dashboard to my curation site
Google +
Facebook
Twitter
I also have a Word document open

 

Step Seven – Get Rolling

e.g. search for the term “content marketing” in the last 24 hours as shown above; grab 5 or 6 posts that are relevant and make tweets about them and put them on timely/buffer/scoopit

 

Step Eight – Natural Overflow

Doing twitter first thing after curation is great, if you have the time.

20-30 minutes after you have your automated posts in place to interact with your feed, clean out the spam tweeps, follow back the real people, etc.

 

Step Nine – Use what you Learn

Use your curation is as the basis for your own blogs

Not regurgitation, but rather letting your new-found knowledge fuel your next post. Or, add to the list of blog ideas you have on a running list somewhere.

 

Setting aside this 45 minutes a day to get the most relevant pieces of content your industry has to offer can not only fill your feeds, but it can also fuel your entire day. And it should, because you should be talking about the latest things in your industry.

 

Great ideas by Amie Marse - http://bit.ly/HfET6B ;


Via maxOz, janlgordon
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Matmi's comment, April 5, 2012 8:16 AM
Some great tips. Would you also spend the time commenting on the curated posts? I know there are some who believe that it is a necessity and others who feel there is no need as you are merely helping others to filter the noise. I try to mix it up depending on time available.
Rescooped by Nikola Pohlupkov from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

How Startups Can Gain Visability and Reputation by Curating Great Content

How Startups Can Gain Visability and Reputation by Curating Great Content | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

I selected this wonderful piece by Michael J. Fern of Intigi because it reinforces the importance of curation and has a lot of great insights.

 

In this article the author refers to Robert Scoble,who has built an enormous following on several social networks by curating and sharing the latest news about technology and startups.

 

He says that just like Scobleizer, startups should use curation to catapult their online presence and influence.

 

**Curation is a useful approach for all companies but especially for startups:

 

Here's what especially caught my attention:

 

**Thought Leadership

   

If outsiders view your company as a key source of  industry informataion, you will quickly build your brand recognition as well as develop trust and goodwill among customers.

 

**Hub of Information

    

By being first to market as a content curator in your space and by hosting curated content on your website, you can quickly rise as a primary destination site for those interested in your industry.

 

**Collections

    

By creating a bundle of articles, images, videos or websites that relate to a specific them and keeping it updated, this “guide” can become an important resource for social media marketers.

 

**Content with Commentary

    

Using 3rd party articles and adding your own point of view you can build a dedicated following. He refers to Daring Fireball, a blog that has built an impressive loyal following of 30,000

 

One Takeaway: 

 

**Successful curators often employ several of these approaches in addition to producing their own original content

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Feel free to visit our fanpage - Curatti launching soon - everything you ever wanted to know about content curation - http://on.fb.me/wfWPao

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/zTGY37]


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Rescooped by Nikola Pohlupkov from Social on the GO!!!
Scoop.it!

Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More

Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

This is a great tool for curators!

 

Intro:

 

"With a Web full of stuff, discovery is a hard problem. Search engines were the first tools on the scene, but their rankings still have a hard time identifying relevance the same way a human user would."

 

Excerpt:

 

Digging For Content

 

Thoora was founded in 2008, and it originally launched as a real-time news aggregator, which we covered back in 2009. But this new iteration is about much more than scanning the news.

 

This is a toolkit for users to explore and research topics, and it learns more about them as its users sort out what matters to them. It is a social tool - users can share topics, and the Thoora site features highlights - but the purpose of the tool is to turn up the most relevant content on the topic, no matter how deeply it's buried in the Web.

 

"We like to say that we're at the intersection of aggregation, curation and search," says Carrie Shaw, head of product at Thoora. As far as users are concerned, that's a good description, but the real value of Thoora comes from the learning algorithms at work behind the scenes. As users create topics, discover content and clean up the results, the Thoora engine gets better at recommendations.

 

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/thoora.php


Via janlgordon, ABroaderView, Nikola Pohlupkov
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Rescooped by Nikola Pohlupkov from Social on the GO!!!
Scoop.it!

Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More

Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

This is a great tool for curators!

 

Intro:

 

"With a Web full of stuff, discovery is a hard problem. Search engines were the first tools on the scene, but their rankings still have a hard time identifying relevance the same way a human user would."

 

Excerpt:

 

Digging For Content

 

Thoora was founded in 2008, and it originally launched as a real-time news aggregator, which we covered back in 2009. But this new iteration is about much more than scanning the news.

 

This is a toolkit for users to explore and research topics, and it learns more about them as its users sort out what matters to them. It is a social tool - users can share topics, and the Thoora site features highlights - but the purpose of the tool is to turn up the most relevant content on the topic, no matter how deeply it's buried in the Web.

 

"We like to say that we're at the intersection of aggregation, curation and search," says Carrie Shaw, head of product at Thoora. As far as users are concerned, that's a good description, but the real value of Thoora comes from the learning algorithms at work behind the scenes. As users create topics, discover content and clean up the results, the Thoora engine gets better at recommendations.

 

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/thoora.php


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Rescooped by Nikola Pohlupkov from "#Google+, +1, Facebook, Twitter, Scoop, Foursquare, Empire Avenue, Klout and more"
Scoop.it!

Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More

Thoora Turns Up Most Relevant Content Around Topics That Matter To Users & More | Social on the GO!!! | Scoop.it

This is a great tool for curators!

 

Intro:

 

"With a Web full of stuff, discovery is a hard problem. Search engines were the first tools on the scene, but their rankings still have a hard time identifying relevance the same way a human user would."

 

Excerpt:

 

Digging For Content

 

Thoora was founded in 2008, and it originally launched as a real-time news aggregator, which we covered back in 2009. But this new iteration is about much more than scanning the news.

 

This is a toolkit for users to explore and research topics, and it learns more about them as its users sort out what matters to them. It is a social tool - users can share topics, and the Thoora site features highlights - but the purpose of the tool is to turn up the most relevant content on the topic, no matter how deeply it's buried in the Web.

 

"We like to say that we're at the intersection of aggregation, curation and search," says Carrie Shaw, head of product at Thoora. As far as users are concerned, that's a good description, but the real value of Thoora comes from the learning algorithms at work behind the scenes. As users create topics, discover content and clean up the results, the Thoora engine gets better at recommendations.

 

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/thoora.php


Via janlgordon, ABroaderView
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