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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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The Ancient Marriage between Music, Movement and Mood | Scientific American Blog Network

Think back to that moment when you first heard your favorite song. What about it made you stop in your tracks? Was it the incessant buildup, ...
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Facebook warms - most - hearts in chilly Swedish city

Facebook warms - most - hearts in chilly Swedish city | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Few people have heard about the town of Luleaa, but if they are Facebook users, chances are their pictures, status updates and "likes" have passed through this Swedish port near the Arctic Circle.
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Meditation May Help Slow Progression Of Alzheimer's Disease - RedOrbit

Meditation May Help Slow Progression Of Alzheimer's Disease - RedOrbit | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
ANINEWS Meditation May Help Slow Progression Of Alzheimer's Disease RedOrbit “We know that approximately 50 percent of people diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment – the intermediate stage between the expected declines of normal aging and the...
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FAU neuroscientists receive patent for new 5D method to understand big data

FAU neuroscientists receive patent for new 5D method to understand big data | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Florida Atlantic University received a U.S. patent for a new method to display large amounts of data in a color-coded, easy-to-read graph.
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Imaging the magnetically stimulated brain

Imaging the magnetically stimulated brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—MRI scanners have steadily increased in power, giving researchers ever finer-grained snapshots of the brain in action.
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The Microscopic Structures of Dried Human Tears - Smithsonian (blog)

The Microscopic Structures of Dried Human Tears - Smithsonian (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Smithsonian (blog) The Microscopic Structures of Dried Human Tears Smithsonian (blog) Emotional tears, for instance, have been found to contain protein-based hormones including the neurotransmitter leucine enkephalin, a natural painkiller that is...
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Autistic People More Likely To Have Synesthesia: 'Sensory Hypersensitivity' May Make Colors Appear When They Hear Sounds

Autistic People More Likely To Have Synesthesia: 'Sensory Hypersensitivity' May Make Colors Appear When They Hear Sounds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Cambridge University researchers found a possible link between synesthesia, the condition where people mix two senses, and autism.
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31 Reasons Why Men Don’t Cheat

31 Reasons Why Men Don’t Cheat | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
"Here's a shocker. I love my wife enormously. I worry about her daily. My love for her as a whole human being is greater than my sexual needs."
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That lovin' feeling: Men's brains respond to gentle touch - NBCNews.com

That lovin' feeling: Men's brains respond to gentle touch - NBCNews.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
LiveScience.com
That lovin' feeling: Men's brains respond to gentle touch
NBCNews.com
The social contact activated chemicals in the brain's opioid system that may be critical for maintaining social bonds with others.
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Brain study offers “intriguing clues toward new therapies” for psychiatric disorders

Brain study offers “intriguing clues toward new therapies” for psychiatric disorders | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Over on Science Now today, Los Angeles Times writer Geoffrey Mohan describes how neuroscientists here have “for the first time traced how three brain networks mediate the mind’s internal focus and its processing of stimuli from the outside world.”...
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Surgeons Find New Method to Reduce Risk of Blood Clots During Brain Traumas

Surgeons Find New Method to Reduce Risk of Blood Clots During Brain Traumas | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers discover a new protocol, which uses preventive blood thinners in the treatment of patients with TBI, lowers the risk of the patients developing fatal blood clots without increasing the risk of intracranial bleeding.
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The functional and structural neural basis of individual differences in loss aversion | CRESA

The functional and structural neural basis of individual differences in loss aversion | CRESA | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Decision making under risk entails the anticipation of prospective outcomes, typically leading to the greater sensitivity to losses than gains known as loss aversion. Previous studies on the neural bases of choice-outcome anticipation and loss aversion provided inconsistent results, showing either bidirectional mesolimbic responses of activation for gains and deactivation for losses, or a specific amygdala involvement in processing losses. Here we focused on loss aversion with the aim to address interindividual differences in the neural bases of choice-outcome anticipation. Fifty-six healthy human participants accepted or rejected 104 mixed gambles offering equal (50%) chances of gaining or losing different amounts of money while their brain activity was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We report both bidirectional and gain/loss-specific responses while evaluating risky gambles, with amygdala and posterior insula specifically tracking the magnitude of potential losses. At the individual level, loss aversion was reflected both in limbic fMRI responses and in gray matter volume in a structural amygdala–thalamus–striatum network, in which the volume of the “output” centromedial amygdala nuclei mediating avoidance behavior was negatively correlated with monetary performance. We conclude that outcome anticipation and ensuing loss aversion involve multiple neural systems, showing functional and structural individual variability directly related to the actual financial outcomes of choices. By supporting the simultaneous involvement of both appetitive and aversive processing in economic decision making, these results contribute to the interpretation of existing inconsistencies on the neural bases of anticipating choice outcomes.


Via Alessandro Cerboni, Emre Erdogan
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Teaching Empathy to the 'Me' Generation

Teaching Empathy to the 'Me' Generation | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Capital University’s non-credit Empathy Experiment immerses students in the plight of the working poor to promote understanding.

 

The banner on the side of the Capital University music conservatory has an outline of a sneaker and asks, “They walked a mile in someone else’s shoes. How much did they learn?”

 

Inside the hall in Columbus, Ohio, a few hundred people wait to find out. They are here this evening late in April for the concluding event of the Empathy Experiment — an experiment not in an empirical sense, but in teaching empathy.

 

By Eric Leake 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:21 AM


The general hope is that teaching empathy might lead to greater social harmony, altruistic action, social justice, and interpersonal and intercultural understanding.

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Volunteers sought for study on stress levels among dementia caregivers - thejournal.ie

Volunteers sought for study on stress levels among dementia caregivers - thejournal.ie | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Volunteers sought for study on stress levels among dementia caregivers
thejournal.ie
The three-year project is being being undertaken by Trinity College's Institute for Neuroscience.
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Could Hunger Make Us More Charitable?

Could Hunger Make Us More Charitable? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
NPR:
Hunger can make people emotional, that’s for sure. Some people get “hangry” when their blood sugar levels drop and their irritability rises. Others get greedy.
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'You can stroke your way to better bonding' - Sowetan

'You can stroke your way to better bonding' - Sowetan | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Sowetan 'You can stroke your way to better bonding' Sowetan Findings showed that this type of gentle contact activates chemicals in the brain's opioid system that may be critical for social bonding and can help the brain distinguish between...
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Insulin plays a role in mediating worms' perceptions and behaviors - Toronto NewsFIX

Insulin plays a role in mediating worms' perceptions and behaviors - Toronto NewsFIX | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Insulin plays a role in mediating worms' perceptions and behaviors Toronto NewsFIX The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has exactly 302 neurons—-far less than the estimated 100 billion neurons a person has—-and we already know how each of them is...
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Brain Imaging Reveals Dynamic Changes Caused by Pain Medicines - Newswise (press release)

Brain Imaging Reveals Dynamic Changes Caused by Pain Medicines Newswise (press release) Previous research has shown that fibromyalgia patients may have heightened neural activity in a region of the brain involved in processing pain and emotion...
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A&S Professor's Neuroimaging Work Featured in Nature Article - Syracuse University News

A&S Professor's Neuroimaging Work Featured in Nature Article - Syracuse University News | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A&S Professor's Neuroimaging Work Featured in Nature Article
Syracuse University News
Aptly titled “Neuroscience: A Head Start for Brain Imaging,” the piece references White's groundbreaking work in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).
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Cognitive Neuroscience Weekly: Visual-cortex GABA concentrations ...

Cognitive Neuroscience Weekly: Visual-cortex GABA concentrations ... | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Since the amount of information one receives in daily life by far exceeds the limited capacity of one's processing resources, selecting relevant information and suppressing irrelevant information is a vital ability.
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Q&A: Neuroscientist Eric R. Kandel on the biology of mind - Los Angeles Times

Q&A: Neuroscientist Eric R. Kandel on the biology of mind - Los Angeles Times | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Q&A: Neuroscientist Eric R. Kandel on the biology of mind
Los Angeles Times
Neuroscientist and Nobel laureate Eric R. Kandel is haunted by his childhood memory of Nazis expelling his family from Vienna.
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'Love hormone' may play wider role in social interaction than previously thought - Toronto NewsFIX

'Love hormone' may play wider role in social interaction than previously thought - Toronto NewsFIX | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
'Love hormone' may play wider role in social interaction than previously thought Toronto NewsFIX Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown that oxytocin – often referred to as “the love hormone” because of its importance...
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Study finds altered brain connections in epilepsy patients

Study finds altered brain connections in epilepsy patients | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Patients with the most common form of focal epilepsy have widespread, abnormal connections in their brains that could provide clues toward diagnosis and treatment, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.
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Glowing Worms Illuminate Roots of Behavior in Animals

Glowing Worms Illuminate Roots of Behavior in Animals | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Researchers develop novel method to image worm brain activity and screen early stage compounds aimed at treating autism and anxiety. A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and The Rockefeller University in New York has developed a novel system to image brain activity in multiple awake and unconstrained worms. The technology, which makes it possible to study the genetics and neural circuitry associated with animal behavior, can also be used as a high-throughput screening tool for drug development targeting autism, anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and other brain disorders. The team details their technology and early results in the paper "High-throughput imaging of neuronal activity in Caenorhabditis elegans," published on-line in advance of print by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . "One of our major objectives is to understand the neural signals that direct behavior—how sensory information is processed through a network of neurons leading to specific decisions and responses," said Dirk Albrecht, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at WPI and senior author of the paper. Albrecht led the research team both at WPI and at Rockefeller, where he served previously as a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of Cori Bargmann, PhD, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and a co-author of the new paper. To study neuronal activity, Albrecht’s lab uses the tiny worm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a nematode found in many environments around the world. A typical adult C. elegans is just 1 millimeter long and has 969 cells, of which 302 are neurons. Despite its small size, the worm is a complex organism able to do all of the things animals must do to survive. It can move, eat, mate, and process environmental cues that help it forage for food or react to threats. As a bonus for researchers, C.elegans is transparent. By using various imaging technologies, including optical microscopes, one can literally see into the worm and watch physiological processes in real time. In addition to watching the head neurons light up as they picked up odor cues, the new system can trace signaling through "interneurons." These are pathways that connect external sensors to the rest of the network (the "worm brain") and send signals to muscle cells that adjust the worm's movement based on the cues. Numerous brain disorders in people are believed to arise when neural networks malfunction. In some cases the malfunction is dramatic overreaction to a routine stimulus, while in others it is a lack of appropriate reactions to important cues. Since C. elegans and humans share many of the same genes, discovering genetic causes for differing neuronal responses in worms could be applicable to human physiology. Experimental compounds designed to modulate the action of nerve cells and neuronal networks could be tested first on worms using Albrecht’s new system. The compounds would be infused in the worm arena, along with other stimuli, and the reaction of the worms’ nervous systems could be imaged and analyzed.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Tom Perran
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Tom Perran's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:46 PM
Fascinating and promising new research!