Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Seizure Drug May Help Some Heavy Drinkers Cut Alcohol Use - Medscape

Seizure Drug May Help Some Heavy Drinkers Cut Alcohol Use Medscape "Because topiramate interacts with multiple neurotransmitter and enzyme systems, this provides a specific target for the development of medications to reduce heavy drinking," they...
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Head movement during fMRI may bias sampling toward subjects with lower ... - News-Medical.net

Head movement during fMRI may bias sampling toward subjects with lower ... - News-Medical.net | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Head movement during fMRI may bias sampling toward subjects with lower ...
News-Medical.net
The study was published in the January issue of Human Brain Mapping. (Wylie GR, Genova H, DeLuca J, Chiaravalloti N, Sumowski JF.
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'Decoder' could lead to treatment for paralysis - Futurity

'Decoder' could lead to treatment for paralysis - Futurity | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists tested a prosthesis that allows one animal to use its recorded neural activity to control limb movements in a different, sedated animal.

 

"The next step is to advance the development of brain-machine interface algorithms using the principles of control theory and statistical signal processing," says Maryam Shanechi. "Such brain-machine interface architectures could enable patients to generate complex movements using robotic arms or paralyzed limbs." (Credit: Maya Ibuki/Flickr) 

To help people suffering paralysis from injury, stroke, or disease, scientists have invented brain-machine interfaces that record electrical signals of neurons in the brain and translate them to movement. Usually, that means the neural signals direct a device, like a robotic arm.

 

Maryam Shanechi, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Cornell University, hopes to help paralyzed people move their own limb, just by thinking about it.

 

When paralyzed patients imagine or plan a movement, neurons in the brain’s motor cortical areas still activate even though the communication link between the brain and muscles is broken. By implanting sensors in these brain areas, neural activity can be recorded and translated to the patient’s desired movement using a mathematical transform called the decoder.

 

These interfaces allow patients to generate movements directly with their thoughts.

 


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Technologies for the Next Century of Brain Research

Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina introduces the March 2014 issue of Scientific American
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Social contact, regular exercise key to living longer

Social contact, regular exercise key to living longer | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Social contact and regular exercise are key to aging well and living a longer life, according to newly presented research.
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Scientists unveil the mechanisms underlying the immediate effect of deep brain stimulation in depression

Scientists unveil the mechanisms underlying the immediate effect of deep brain stimulation in depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A team of UCA researchers led by Professor Esther Berrocoso and in joint collaboration with the mental health research groups of the Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM) have carried out a pioneering project in Spain.
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Can you boost your brain power through video?

Can you boost your brain power through video? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Watching video of simple tasks before carrying them out may boost the brain's structure, or plasticity, and increase motor skills, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting...
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Study of zebrafish neurons may lead to understanding of birth defects like spina bifida

Study of zebrafish neurons may lead to understanding of birth defects like spina bifida | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The zebrafish, a tropical freshwater fish similar to a minnow and native to the southeastern Himalayan region, is well established as a key tool for researchers studying human diseases, including brain disorders.
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Empathy and its Development- Nancy Eisenberg, Janet Strayer

That this is the source of our fellow-feeling for the misery of others, that it is by changing places in fancy with the sufferer, that we come either to conceive or to be affected by what he feels, may be demonstrated by many obvious observations, if it should not be thought sufficiently evident of itself. When we see a stroke aimed and just ready to fall upon the leg or arm of another person, we naturally shrink and draw back our own leg or our own arm; and when it does fall, we feel it in some measure, and are hurt by it as well as the sufferer. The mob, when they are gazing at a dancer on the slack rope, naturally writhe and twist and balance their own bodies, as they see him do, and as they feel that they themselves must do if in his situation. Persons of delicate fibres and a weak constitution of body complain, that in looking on the sores and ulcers which are exposed by beggars in the streets, they are apt to feel an itching or uneasy sensation in the correspondent part of their own bodies. The horror which they conceive at the misery of those wretches affects that particular part in themselves more than any other; because that horror arises from conceiving what they themselves would suffer, if they really were the wretches whom they are looking upon, and if that particular part in themselves was actually affected in the same miserable manner. The very force of this conception is sufficient, in their feeble frames, to produce that itching or uneasy sensation complained of. Men of the most robust make, observe that in looking upon sore eyes they often feel a very sensible soreness in their own, which proceeds from the same reason; that organ being in the strongest man more delicate, than any other part of the body is in the weakest.


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Schizophrenia risk increases 10-fold with genetic mutation

Schizophrenia risk increases 10-fold with genetic mutation | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A risk gene mutation for schizophrenia has been identified by researchers in Ireland, who say this mutation spans back nearly 500 years to a common European ancestor.
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New research sheds light on how the body regulates fundamental neuro-hormone - HealthCanal.com

New research sheds light on how the body regulates fundamental neuro-hormone - HealthCanal.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research sheds light on how the body regulates fundamental neuro-hormone
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New research sheds light on how the body regulates fundamental neuro-hormone. 12 hours 41 minutes ago.
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Brain's 'sweet spot' for love found in neurological patient

Brain's 'sweet spot' for love found in neurological patient | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A region deep inside the brain controls how quickly people make decisions about love, according to new research.
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The Irrational Fight-Flight-Freeze Response - PsychCentral.com (blog)

The Irrational Fight-Flight-Freeze Response - PsychCentral.com (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The Irrational Fight-Flight-Freeze Response
PsychCentral.com (blog)
“The brain's prefrontal cortex—which is key to decision-making and memory—often becomes temporarily impaired.
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Neuron-generating brain region could hold promise for neurodegenerative therapies

Neuron-generating brain region could hold promise for neurodegenerative therapies | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Adult humans continuously produce new neurons in the striatum, a brain region involved in motor control and cognitive functions, and these neurons could play an important role in recovery from stroke and possibly finding new treatments for...
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The Musical Brain: Novel Study of Jazz Players Shows Common Brain Circuitry Processes Both Music and Language

The brains of jazz musicians engrossed in spontaneous, improvisational musical conversation showed robust activation of brain areas traditionally associated with spoken language and syntax, which are used to interpret the structure of phrases and...
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Prions Are Key to Preserving Long-term Memories

Prions Are Key to Preserving Long-term Memories | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The famed protein chain reaction that made mad cow disease a terror may be involved in helping to ensure that our recollections don't fade

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Getting Fit Increases Pain Tolerance

Getting Fit Increases Pain Tolerance | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
If you want to toughen up, you could take extreme measures, such as sitting in an ice bath or sauna for increasingly long times. Or you could just go for a run or a ride, suggests new research out of Australia.
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Study discovers new way to prevent some strokes

Study discovers new way to prevent some strokes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Larry Ambrose woke up one night, wandered into his kitchen but couldn't completely read the time on his microwave. A few days later when he noticed his blood pressure was unusually high, he went to the hospital and was diagnosed as having a stroke.
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Brain Implant That Lets One Monkey Control Another May Lead To Paralysis Cure

Brain Implant That Lets One Monkey Control Another May Lead To Paralysis Cure | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In work inspired partly by the movie "Avatar," one monkey could control the body of another monkey using thought alone by connecting the brain of the puppet-master monkey to the spine of the other through a prosthesis, researchers say.
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Researchers hone in on Alzheimer's disease

Researchers hone in on Alzheimer's disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers studying peptides using the Gordon supercomputer at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have found new ways to elucidate the creation of the toxic oligomers associated with...
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European Neurology 2014, Vol. 71, No. 5-6 Cannabis Spray proves effective in reducing MS spasticity

European Neurology 2014, Vol. 71, No. 5-6 Cannabis Spray proves effective in reducing MS spasticity | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Conclusion:
Real-life data confirm nabiximols [cannabis spray] as an effective and well-tolerated treatment option for resistant MSS [Multiple Sclerosis Spasticity] in clinical practice.


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Julian Buchanan's curator insight, February 17, 2014 6:38 PM

Great news but sad it has taken so long - if it was legal then many more MS sufferers might have been able to find some relief from cannabis self medication

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Superstars of Psychology: 10 Best Short Talks (Videos) | PsyBlog - Understand Your Mind

Superstars of Psychology: 10 Best Short Talks (Videos) | PsyBlog - Understand Your Mind | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

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Psychology Visual Art Eye Brain And Art :: Applied psychology :: Cambridge University Press

Psychology Visual Art Eye Brain And Art :: Applied psychology :: Cambridge University Press | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Parut° de G. Mather, "The Psychology of Visual #Art | Eye, Brain and Art", cf. http://t.co/ogw9gl6v3t via @CambridgeUP
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Real-time FMRI neurofeedback training of amygdala a... [PLoS One. 2014] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
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