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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Neuroscience for Social Workers

It might seem unusual for a faculty member in social work to be involved in research about brain imaging and neural systems, but Boston College Graduate Scho...
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Cognitive neuroscience of social emotions and implications for psychopathology: Examining embarrassment, guilt, envy, and schadenfreude.

Social emotions are affective states elicited during social interactions and integral for promoting socially-appropriate behaviors and discouraging socially-inappropriate ones. Social emotion-processing deficits significantly impair interpersonal relationships, and play distinct roles in the manifestation and maintenance of clinical symptomology. Elucidating the neural correlates of discrete social emotions can serve as a window to better understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disorders. Moral cognition and social emotion-processing broadly recruit a fronto-temporo-subcortical network, supporting empathy, perspective-taking, self-processing, and reward-processing. The present review specifically examines the neural correlates of embarrassment, guilt, envy, and schadenfreude. Embarrassment and guilt are self-conscious emotions, evoked during negative evaluation following norm violations and supported by a fronto-temporo-posterior network. Embarrassment is evoked by social transgressions and recruits greater anterior temporal regions, representing social conceptual knowledge. Guilt is evoked by moral transgressions and recruits greater prefrontal regions, representing perspective-taking and behavioral change demands. Envy and schadenfreude are fortune-of-other emotions, evoked during social comparison and supported by a prefrontal-striatal network. Envy represents displeasure in others' fortunes, and recruits increased dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, representing cognitive dissonance, and decreased reward-related striatal regions. Schadenfruede represents pleasure in others' misfortunes, and recruits reduced empathy-related insular regions and increased reward-related striatal regions. Implications for psychopathology and treatment design are discussed.
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How does memory work? | The Edynco blog

How does memory work? | The Edynco blog | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Via Tom Perran
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Tom Perran's curator insight, March 23, 2014 9:32 AM

Interactive learning map that shows how we get and keep new information

David Baker's curator insight, March 24, 2014 3:20 PM

Memory and the interactive modeling of both how it works and how to support memory are topics of interest for teachers.

Connie Hamilton Ed.S.'s curator insight, April 12, 2014 11:54 PM

If we want to help our students to learn efficiently, we should know something about functioning of our memory.

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Oxytocin, Dopamine, and Turning Mundane Tasks into Ecstatic ...

Oxytocin, Dopamine, and Turning Mundane Tasks into Ecstatic ... | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When this happens we release a neuro-substance called dopamine. Dopamine in turn triggers the release of oxytocin-which is what creates feelings of all-is-wellness and interconnectedness with life, and specifically bonding ...
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Q&A: Kishida on How We Make Decisions - Elliott Wave

Q&A: Kishida on How We Make Decisions
Elliott Wave
His talk will cover insights about the role of dopamine in decision-making and how the context in which we make decisions influences our brain's behavior.
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The Future of the Mind and Michio Kaku - TechNet Blogs

The Future of the Mind and Michio Kaku -  TechNet Blogs | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Where Human Genome Project mapped every piece of human DNA, the BRAIN Initiative will map every neuron in the brain. http://t.co/N8knJZM4mr
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Emotional pain may be caused by brain stem cells - San Diego Jewish World

Emotional pain may be caused by brain stem cells San Diego Jewish World Until now findings showed that during exposure to tense situations, the amygdala was stimulated by the higher brain areas and in turn stimulated areas in the brain stem...
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Visualizing real-time development of capillary networks in adult brains

Visualizing real-time development of capillary networks in adult brains | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The advancement of microscopic photoimaging techniques has enabled the visualization of real-time cellular events in living organs.
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Noam Chomsky On Artificial Intelligence , Cognitive Science , and Neuroscience

Noam Chomsky On Artificial Intelligence , Cognitive Science , and Neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Brains, Minds and Machines Symposium, May, 2011, at MIT. Keynote Panel: The Golden Age A Look at the Original Roots of Artificial Intelligence, Cognitive Sci.
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Arts and Cognitive Neuroscience

Experiences in which the senses are intermingled in usual ways are a common motif in the descriptions that mystics provide of their unordinary sensory experi...
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The microbiota-gut-brain axis: neurobehavioral correlates, health and sociality [Front Integr Neurosci. 2013]

Recent data suggest that the human body is not such a neatly self-sufficient island after all. It is more like a super-complex ecosystem containing trillions of bacteria and other microorganisms that inhabit all our surfaces; skin, mouth, sexual organs, and specially intestines. It has recently become evident that such microbiota, specifically within the gut, can greatly influence many physiological parameters, including cognitive functions, such as learning, memory and decision making processes. Human microbiota is a diverse and dynamic ecosystem, which has evolved in a mutualistic relationship with its host. Ontogenetically, it is vertically inoculated from the mother during birth, established during the first year of life and during lifespan, horizontally transferred among relatives, mates or close community members. This micro-ecosystem serves the host by protecting it against pathogens, metabolizing complex lipids and polysaccharides that otherwise would be inaccessible nutrients, neutralizing drugs and carcinogens, modulating intestinal motility, and making visceral perception possible. It is now evident that the bidirectional signaling between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain, mainly through the vagus nerve, the so called "microbiota-gut-vagus-brain axis," is vital for maintaining homeostasis and it may be also involved in the etiology of several metabolic and mental dysfunctions/disorders. Here we review evidence on the ability of the gut microbiota to communicate with the brain and thus modulate behavior, and also elaborate on the ethological and cultural strategies of human and non-human primates to select, transfer and eliminate microorganisms for selecting the commensal profile.
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Authors@Google: Daniel Goleman - YouTube

Daniel Goleman discusses his book "Social Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships" as a part of the Authors@Google series. For more from Daniel ...
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Brain Entropy Mapping Using fMRI

Brain Entropy Mapping Using fMRI | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Entropy is an important trait for life as well as the human brain. Characterizing brain entropy (BEN) may provide an informative tool to assess brain states and brain functions. Yet little is known about the distribution and regional organization of BEN in normal brain. The purpose of this study was to examine the whole brain entropy patterns using a large cohort of normal subjects. A series of experiments were first performed to validate an approximate entropy measure regarding its sensitivity, specificity, and reliability using synthetic data and fMRI data. Resting state fMRI data from a large cohort of normal subjects (n = 1049) from multi-sites were then used to derive a 3-dimensional BEN map, showing a sharp low-high entropy contrast between the neocortex and the rest of brain. The spatial heterogeneity of resting BEN was further studied using a data-driven clustering method, and the entire brain was found to be organized into 7 hierarchical regional BEN networks that are consistent with known structural and functional brain parcellations. These findings suggest BEN mapping as a physiologically and functionally meaningful measure for studying brain functions.

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Our Primitive Reflexes May be More Sophisticated Than They Appear

Our Primitive Reflexes May be More Sophisticated Than They Appear | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Our "primitive" reflexes could involve more sophisticated brain function that originally thought, according to a new study.
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Sensing Subtle Differences in the Environment

Sensing Subtle Differences in the Environment | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The CA2 region of the hippocampus helps mice sense the difference between existing memories and new experiences, a new study reports.
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How Does The Brain Retain Information? [infographic]

How Does The Brain Retain Information? [infographic] | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The cerebellum is the reason you can add numbers and swim. It monitors the procedural based memories of circumstances that must be learned.

Via iPamba
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Would You Cheat? Cheating Behavior, Human Nature, and Decision-Making - Student Pulse

Would You Cheat? Cheating Behavior, Human Nature, and Decision-Making - Student Pulse | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Student Pulse
Would You Cheat? Cheating Behavior, Human Nature, and Decision-Making
Student Pulse
Do they have to suppress their vicious inclinations in order to behave morally?
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Scientists catch brain damage in the act | Canadian Association for Neuroscience

Scientists have uncovered how inflammation and lack of oxygen conspire to cause brain damage in conditions such as stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.

Th...
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In rats, diffuse brain damage can occur with no signs of 'concussion'

In rats, diffuse brain damage can occur with no signs of 'concussion' | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A standard experimental model of concussion in rats causes substantial brain damage—but no behavioral changes comparable to those seen in patients with concussion, reports a study in the April issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress...
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Oxytocin and emotional oversensitivity

Christopher Cardoso, PhD candidate in Concordia University's Department of Psychology, discusses a new study that shows that oxytocin can make healthy people...
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Cognitive Neuroscience Society » CNS 2014 Program

Cognitive Neuroscience Society » CNS 2014 Program | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Sorry to miss it: Cognitive Neuroscience Society meeting in Boston (April 5-8). Full program here: http://t.co/WoJsHbHWyE #CNS2014
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The Neuroscience of Social Emotion & it's Importance to Learning. Part 2.

Part 2 of 7. On the 10th of November 2011 the Hunter Institute of Mental Health (HIMH) hosted a workshop with special guest Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, Ed.D.,...
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'Rich club' brain network grows richer with age - SFARI News (blog)

'Rich club' brain network grows richer with age - SFARI News (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
'Rich club' brain network grows richer with age SFARI News (blog) To view both structural and functional pathways during times of rest, they used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as well as diffusion-weighted MRI — a technique that uses...
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Social neuroeconomics: the influence of microbiota in partner-choice and sociality [Curr Pharm Des. 2014] - PubMed - NCBI

By focusing on studies on primate behaviour and human neuroscience, we describe how different neurological processes are the base of proximate aspects of social-decision making. We also reviewed the fact that distinct aspects of animal behaviour are not under conscious or abstract control and that instead they may be regulated by adaptive ´rules of thumb´. In particular, by describing the microbiota-gut-brain axis we elaborate on suggesting that microbiota has an influence on within-individual aspects of social decision making and in particular facilitating social interactions. Finally, we presents comparative evidence of the role of microorganisms as modifiers of aspects of kinship, reproduction and group-members´ recognition, suggesting how microbiota also has an influence on between-individual aspects of decision making, which are themselves primary aspects of cooperation. In summary, we propose that modern socioeconomic choice theories may still benefit from alternative theoretical frameworks that consider the human being as a complex organism, with intrinsic constraints and capacities product of its evolutionary history, and not just as an exclusively-cognate decision maker acting independently of its closest partners: its microbiota.
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Could depression treatment help cure medical cost woes? - Insurance News Net (press release)

Could depression treatment help cure medical cost woes?
Insurance News Net (press release)
That's the same thing that TMS does - the magnet near the head "reaches deep into the amygdala, which scientists think is responsible for mood," he said.
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