Social Neuroscience Advances
5.8K views | +1 today
Follow
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Surprising findings from studies of spontaneous brain activity | Science Codex

Surprising findings from studies of spontaneous brain activity | Science Codex | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Dementia: what’s needed now? | University of Cambridge

Dementia: what’s needed now? | University of Cambridge | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Mind over matter showcases 12 of Britain’s oldest brain donors who agreed to be photographed and interviewed. Presented by artist Ania Dabrowska and Professor Bronwyn Parry, King’s College London, the event also includes a panel discussion chaired by Carol Brayne, Professor of Public Health Medicine in the Department of Public Health and Primary Care at the University of Cambridge.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

A Fundamental Theory to Model the Mind

A Fundamental Theory to Model the Mind | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In 1999, the Danish physicist Per Bak proclaimed to a group of neuroscientists that it had taken him only 10 minutes to determine where the field had gone wrong. Perhaps the brain was less complicated than they thought, he said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Why do humans laugh? (Hint: It’s rarely because something’s funny.)

Why do humans laugh? (Hint: It’s rarely because something’s funny.) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Slate:
On Jan. 30, 1962, three schoolgirls started giggling in a boarding school classroom in the northeastern corner of what is now Tanzania—and touched off a very strange epidemic.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Noisy Brain Signals

Noisy Brain Signals | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Visual perception errors in those with schizophrenia are consistent with corollary discharge, a new study reports.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Bioengineer Studying How the Brain Controls Movement

A University of California, San Diego research team led by bioengineer Gert Cauwenberghs is working to understand how the brain circuitry controls how we move.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

How We Retrieve Memories—Brain Basics, No. 1

How We Retrieve Memories—Brain Basics, No. 1 | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Have you ever had a moment of temporary amnesia when you can't recall a certain word or someone's name? That's because your brain wasn't able to re-create the pattern of activity that occurred when the memory was stored. Learn more in the first of a series of videos from Scientific American MIND .
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Grateful in April: Be thankful that science endorses reasons to smile - Sydney Morning Herald

Grateful in April: Be thankful that science endorses reasons to smile - Sydney Morning Herald | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Sydney Morning Herald
Grateful in April: Be thankful that science endorses reasons to smile
Sydney Morning Herald
Gratitude also activates the neurotransmitter dopamine, the brain's ''feel-good'' chemical.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Intranasal oxytocin attenuates attentional bias for eating and fat shape stimuli in patients with anorexia nervosa

Intranasal oxytocin attenuates attentional bias for eating and fat shape stimuli in patients with anorexia nervosa http://t.co/cgUDQMxUWm
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Neural circuits underlying emotion and motivation: Insights from optogenetics and pharmacogenetics

Neural circuits underlying emotion and motivation: Insights from optogenetics and pharmacogenetics | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Application of optogenetic and pharmacogenetic tools to study the neural circuits underlying emotional valence, feeding, arousal and motivated behaviors has provided crucial insights into brain function. Expression of light sensitive proteins into specific neurons and subsequent stimulation by light (optogenetics) to control neuronal activity or expression of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) in specific neuronal populations with subsequent activation or suppression of neuronal activity by an otherwise inert ligand (pharmacogenetics) provides control over defined elements of neural circuits. These novel tools have provided a more in depth understanding into several questions about brain function. These include: 
• Regulation of sleep-wake transition by the interaction of hypocretin neurons of lateral hypothalamus and nor adrenergic neurons of the locus coruleaus 
• Regulation of feeding by AGRP and POMC neurons in arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus 
• Place preference and positive reinforcement by activation of DA neuron of VTA 
• Place aversion by activation of VTA GABA and lateral habenula neurons 
• Opposing influences on reinforcement by activation of D1 and D2 expressing medium spiny neurons of dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens 
The list still grows... 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Through the Wormhole: Breaking Down Cognitive Neuroscience : Video : Science Channel

Through the Wormhole: Breaking Down Cognitive Neuroscience : Video : Science Channel | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Everything begins and ends with the brain. Mike Gazzaniga shares his thoughts on our mental life. (Interesting read about what is choice.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Mapping the Semantic Structure of Cognitive Neuroscience [J Cogn Neurosci. 2014]

Mapping the Semantic Structure of Cognitive Neuroscience [J Cogn Neurosci. 2014] | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Cognitive neuroscience, as a discipline, links the biological systems studied by neuroscience to the processing constructs studied by psychology. By mapping these relations throughout the literature of cognitive neuroscience, we visualize the semantic structure of the discipline and point to directions for future research that will advance its integrative goal. For this purpose, network text analyses were applied to an exhaustive corpus of abstracts collected from five major journals over a 30-month period, including every study that used fMRI to investigate psychological processes. From this, we generate network maps that illustrate the relationships among psychological and anatomical terms, along with centrality statistics that guide inferences about network structure. Three terms-prefrontal complex, amygdala, and anterior cingulate cortex-dominate the network structure with their high frequency in the literature and the density of their connections with other neuroanatomical terms. From network statistics, we identify terms that are understudied compared with their importance in the network (e.g., insula and thalamus), underspecified in the language of the discipline (e.g., terms associated with executive function), or imperfectly integrated with other concepts (i.e., subdisciplines like decision neuroscience that are disconnected from the main network). Taking these results as the basis for prescriptive recommendations, we conclude that semantic analyses provide useful guidance for cognitive neuroscience as a discipline, both by illustrating systematic biases in the conduct and presentation of research and by identifying directions that may be most productive for future research.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Why more education lowers dementia risk | University of Cambridge

Why more education lowers dementia risk | University of Cambridge | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Examining the brains of 872 people who had been part of three large ageing studies, and who before their deaths had completed questionnaires about their education, the researchers found that more education makes people better able to cope with changes in the brain associated with dementia. Over the past decade, studies on dementia have consistently showed that the more time you spend in education, the lower your risk of dementia. For each additional year of education there is an 11% decrease in risk of developing dementia, this study reports.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

The Key to Happiness: Brainpower or Social Connectedness?

The Key to Happiness: Brainpower or Social Connectedness? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The six domains of human growth that are vital to well-being.
→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Positive and Negative Thinkers' Brains Revealed

Positive and Negative Thinkers' Brains Revealed | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The ability to stay positive in tough times may be hardwired into the brain, a new neuropsychology study reports.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Most Comprehensive Wiring Diagram of Mammalian Brain to Date

Most Comprehensive Wiring Diagram of Mammalian Brain to Date | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers provide the first comprehensive data set on how the mammalian brain is wired.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Feeling Grateful Makes You A Better Saver And Investor, Study Shows

Feeling Grateful Makes You A Better Saver And Investor, Study Shows | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Forbes:
How were you feeling the day you had to turn in the form telling your benefits department what percent of your salary you wanted to set aside for your 401K?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

First in-depth mammal brain map to reveal neural blips - life - 02 April 2014 - New Scientist

First in-depth mammal brain map to reveal neural blips - life - 02 April 2014 - New Scientist | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The mouse connectome is the first complete, detailed map of any mammal's neural network, and it should shed light on schizophrenia and autism
more...
Mlik Sahib's curator insight, April 2, 2014 6:59 PM

"IT'S not quite as simple as X marks the spot, but uncovering the roots of neural disorders should be much easier now that we have a complete brain map.

The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is the first detailed map of any mammal's neural network. With the equivalent for the human brain still years away, it's an essential stepping stone and should provide insights into conditions such as schizophrenia.

"This is a huge leap for modern neuroscience," says Martijn van den Heuvel at the University Medical Center in Utrecht, the Netherlands. "It will be a reference data set for years of computational neuroscience to come."

 

 

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

What Makes a Compassionate Man?

What Makes a Compassionate Man? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What does it take to foster compassion in men? To find out, Kozo Hattori interviewed scientific and spiritual experts.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Serotonin levels affect the brain’s response to anger | University of Cambridge

Serotonin levels affect the brain’s response to anger | University of Cambridge | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Fluctuations of serotonin levels in the brain, which often occur when someone hasn’t eaten or is stressed, affects brain regions that enable people to regulate anger, new research from the University of Cambridge has shown.
more...
Mlik Sahib's curator insight, March 31, 2014 8:33 PM

"The research revealed that low brain serotonin made communications between specific brain regions of the emotional limbic system of the brain (a structure called the amygdala) and the frontal lobes weaker compared to those present under normal levels of serotonin. The findings suggest that when serotonin levels are low, it may be more difficult for the prefrontal cortex to control emotional responses to anger that are generated within the amygdala.

Using a personality questionnaire, they also determined which individuals have a natural tendency to behave aggressively. In these individuals, the communications between the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex was even weaker following serotonin depletion.  'Weak' communications means that it is more difficult for the prefrontal cortex to control the feelings of anger that are generated within the amygdala when the levels of serotonin are low.  As a result, those individuals who might be predisposed to aggression were the most sensitive to changes in serotonin depletion.

Dr Molly Crockett, co-first author who worked on the research while a PhD student at Cambridge’s Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute (and currently based at the University of Zurich) said: “We've known for decades that serotonin plays a key role in aggression, but it's only very recently that we've had the technology to look into the brain and examine just how serotonin helps us regulate our emotional impulses. By combining a long tradition in behavioral research with new technology, we were finally able to uncover a mechanism for how serotonin might influence aggression.”"

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Decisions, decisions: The Israeli neuroscientist with a lot on his mind - Haaretz

Decisions, decisions: The Israeli neuroscientist with a lot on his mind - Haaretz | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Haaretz Decisions, decisions: The Israeli neuroscientist with a lot on his mind Haaretz “We claim that it doesn't stem from all kinds of complex social things, or from a very complex cognitive brain, but rather that there are some basic...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Urban Residents Diagnosed With PTSD - Guardian Liberty Voice


PTSD affects the amygdala a part of the brain that releases a chemical that helps trigger your response in a fight or flight situation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Optogenetic dissection of amygdala functioning | Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience

Studies of amygdala functioning have occupied a significant place in the history of understanding how the brain controls behavior and cognition. Early work on the amygdala placed this small structure as a key component in the regulation of emotion and affective behavior. Over time, our understanding of its role in brain processes has expanded, as we have uncovered amygdala influences on memory, reward behavior, and overall functioning in many other brain regions. Studies have indicated that the amygdala has widespread connections with a variety of brain structures, from the prefrontal cortex to regions of the brainstem, that explain its powerful influence on other parts of the brain and behaviors mediated by those regions. Thus, many optogenetic studies have focused on harnessing the powers of this technique to elucidate the functioning of the amygdala in relation to motivation, fear, and memory as well as to determine how the amygdala regulates activity in other structures. For example, studies using optogenetics have examined how specific circuits within amygdala nuclei regulate anxiety. Other work has provided insight into how the basolateral and central amygdala nuclei regulate memory processing underlying aversive learning. Many experiments have taken advantage of optogenetics’ ability to target either genetically distinct subpopulations of neurons or the specific projections from the amygdala to other brain regions. Findings from such studies have provided evidence that particular patterns of activity in basolateral amygdala glutamatergic neurons are related to memory consolidation processes, while other work has indicated the critical nature of amygdala inputs to the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens in regulating behavior dependent on those downstream structures. This review will examine the recent discoveries on amygdala functioning made through experiments using optogenetics, placing these findings in the context of the major questions in the field.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Mindfulness and Brain Changes in Sex Addiction Relapse Prevention - PsychCentral.com (blog)

Mindfulness and Brain Changes in Sex Addiction Relapse Prevention - PsychCentral.com (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Mindfulness and Brain Changes in Sex Addiction Relapse Prevention PsychCentral.com (blog) This means mindfulness may improve functioning of the reward system at both ends; the distruptions in drive, motivation, emotional processing (this being the...
more...
No comment yet.