Social Neuroscience Advances
5.6K views | +1 today
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from With My Right Brain
Scoop.it!

Co-operative Behaviour: Neuroscience Insights

Co-operative Behaviour:  Neuroscience Insights | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Co-operation is essential for the functioning of human societies — and several current public policy initiatives, including health and lifestyle and environmental campaigns, depend upon it. Many attempts to persuade people to co-operate and collaborate, however, fail — or succeed for only a limited time. Understanding the neural mechanisms for co-operation can help in developing more effective ways of promoting collective behaviour and in designing policies to achieve societal aims.

Via Kasia Hein-Peters, Emre Erdogan
more...
David Hain's curator insight, May 6, 2014 3:46 AM

More insights from neuroscience about how to collaborate effectively.

John Thurlbeck, FCMI FRSA's curator insight, May 7, 2014 3:05 AM

As a developing leader this is the way forward! Effective collaboration makes for great successes and mutuality is a wonderful principle to anchor your leadership behaviour upon! Thanks to David Hain for the great link!

Ruth Obadia's curator insight, May 11, 2014 2:12 AM
Co-operation with others can be inherently satisfying — and that it’s not contingent on the prospect of material reward. (A 2004 experiment, for example, found increased activity in the reward system of the brain for mutual co-operation decisions, even when controlling for the amount of money earned by the decision itself.)Playing games with another human being is more satisfying (rewarding) than playing with a computer partner.The learning of co-operative behaviour is partly dependent on reciprocation — we tend to co-operate, over the longer term, with those who behave well towards us.Co-operation can be motivated by the anticipation of guilt — activity in regions of the brain associated with ‘negative affective states’ increases when people match the expectations of other players.The ability to understand the mental states of others, traditionally referred to as ‘theory of mind’, plays an important part in co-operation.Co-operation is context-specific, depending partly on prior knowledge of others and their trustworthiness.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder releases dopamine in brain

Deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder releases dopamine in brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

FDA approves new chest implant that can cut sleep apnea by 68 percent

FDA approves new chest implant that can cut sleep apnea by 68 percent | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
U.S. regulators have approved a first-of-its-kind implant that can help ward off moderate to severe sleep apnea, a chronic disorder which affects up to 18 million Americans.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Researchers reveal new cause of epilepsy

Researchers reveal new cause of epilepsy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A team of researchers from SUNY Downstate Medical Center (SUNY Downstate) and Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) has found that deficiencies in hyaluronan, also known as hyaluronic acid or HA, can lead to spontaneous...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Studies identify spinal cord neurons that control skilled limb movement

Studies identify spinal cord neurons that control skilled limb movement | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have identified two types of neurons that enable the spinal cord to control skilled forelimb movement.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Psychology, Sociology & Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Paul Bloom: How Pleasure Works - YouTube

http://chicagohumanities.org - See more Chicago Humanities Festival events. Why are original paintings more valuable than forgeries? Why do people pay millio...

Via Tiago
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Extreme sleep durations may affect brain health in later life

Extreme sleep durations may affect brain health in later life | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new research study led by Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) published in The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society in May, shows an association between midlife and later life sleeping habits with memory; and links extreme sleep durations to...
more...
Emeric Nectoux's comment, May 1, 2014 12:06 PM
:/ Interesting study, made me reflect a bit on my sleep habits... Not sure about my memory health later on ;)
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Brain and cognitive reserve protect long-term against cognitive decline

Brain and cognitive reserve protect long-term against cognitive decline | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Multiple sclerosis researchers have found that brain reserve and cognitive reserve confer a long-term protective effect against cognitive decline. The study has been published in Neurology.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Towards a neuroscience of social interaction/ Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Towards a neuroscience of social interaction/ Frontiers in Human Neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The burgeoning field of social neuroscience has begun to illuminate the complex biological bases of human social cognitive abilities. However, in spite of being based on the premise of investigating the neural bases of interacting minds, the majority of studies have focused on studying brains in isolation using paradigms that investigate offline social cognition, i.e. social cognition from a detached observer's point of view, asking study participants to read out the mental states of others without being engaged in interaction with them. Consequently, the neural correlates of real-time social interaction have remained elusive and may —paradoxically— represent the 'dark matter' of social neuroscience. 

More recently, a growing number of researchers have begun to study online social cognition, i.e. social cognition from a participant's point of view, based on the assumption that there is something fundamentally different when we are actively engaged with others in real-time social interaction as compared to when we merely observe them. Whereas, for offline social cognition, interaction and feedback are merely a way of gathering data about the other person that feeds into processing algorithms 'inside’ the agent, it has been proposed that in online social cognition the knowledge of the other —at least in part— resides in the interaction dynamics ‘between’ the agents. Furthermore being a participant in an ongoing interaction may entail a commitment toward being responsive created by important differences in the motivational foundations of online and offline social cognition. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Papers
Scoop.it!

Markers of criticality in phase synchronisation

The concept of the brain as a critical system is very attractive because systems close to criticality are thought to maximise their dynamic range of information processing and communication. To date, there have been two key experimental observations supporting this hypothesis: i) neuronal avalanches with power law distribution of size and ii) long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs) in the amplitude of neural oscillations. The case for how these maximise dynamic range of information processing and communication is still being made and because a significant substrate for information coding and transmission is neural synchrony it is of interest to link synchronisation measures with those of criticality. We propose a framework for characterising criticality in synchronisation based on a new metric of phase synchronisation (rate of change of phase difference) and a set of methods we have developed for detecting LRTCs. We test this framework against two classical models of criticality (Ising and Kuramoto) and recently described variants of these models aimed to more closely represent human brain dynamics. From these simulations we determine the parameters at which these systems show evidence of LRTCs in phase synchronisation. We demonstrate proof of principle by analysing pairs of human simultaneous EEG and EMG time series, suggesting that LRTCs of corticomuscular phase synchronisation can be detected in the resting state. The existence of LRTCs in fluctuations of phase synchronisation suggests that these fluctuations are governed by non-local behaviour. This has important implications regarding the conditions under which one should expect to see LRTCs in phase synchronisation. Specifically, brain resting states may exhibit LRTCs reflecting a state of readiness facilitating rapid task-dependent shifts towards and away from synchronous states that abolish LRTCs.


Markers of criticality in phase synchronisation
Maria Botcharova, Simon F. Farmer, Luc Berthouze

http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.5774


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

Missing 'swallow tail' is a sign of Parkinson's - Futurity

Missing 'swallow tail' is a sign of Parkinson's - Futurity | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Looking for a group of brain cells shaped like a swallow's tail could be a way to diagnose Parkinson's disease, say researchers.

Via iPamba
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Channel makeover bioengineered to switch off neurons

Channel makeover bioengineered to switch off neurons | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists have bioengineered, in neurons cultured from rats, an enhancement to a cutting edge technology that provides instant control over brain circuit activity with a flash of light.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from With My Right Brain
Scoop.it!

Hello, Stranger

Hello, Stranger | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The casual social interactions we often avoid may actually make us happier.

Via Emre Erdogan
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Scientists reveal circuitry of fundamental motor circuit

Scientists reveal circuitry of fundamental motor circuit | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered the developmental source for a key type of neuron that allows animals to walk, a finding that could help pave the way for new therapies for spinal cord injuries or other motor impairments related to...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Researchers reveal new cause of epilepsy

Researchers reveal new cause of epilepsy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A team of researchers from SUNY Downstate Medical Center (SUNY Downstate) and Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) has found that deficiencies in hyaluronan, also known as hyaluronic acid or HA, can lead to spontaneous...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Atypical form of Alzheimer's disease may be present in a more widespread number of patients

Atypical form of Alzheimer's disease may be present in a more widespread number of patients | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida have defined a subtype of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that they say is neither well recognized nor treated appropriately.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Delving deep into the brain

Delving deep into the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Launched in 2013, the national BRAIN Initiative aims to revolutionize our understanding of cognition by mapping the activity of every neuron in the human brain, revealing how brain circuits interact to create memories, learn new skills, and...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Great expectations: neural computation underlying the use of social norms i decision-making

Social expectations play a critical role in everyday decision-making. However, their precise neuro-computational role in the decision process remains unknown. Here we adopt a decision neuroscience framework by combining methods and theories from psychology, economics and neuroscience to outline a novel, expectation-based, computational model of social preferences. Results demonstrate that this model outperforms the standard inequity-aversion model in explaining decision behavior in a social interactive bargaining task. This is supported by fMRI findings showing that the tracking of social expectation violations is processed by anterior cingulate cortex, extending previous computational conceptualizations of this region to the social domain. This study demonstrates the usefulness of this interdisciplinary approach in better characterizing the psychological processes that underlie social interactive decision-making.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Stem cells from teeth can make brain-like cells

Stem cells from teeth can make brain-like cells | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that stem cells taken from teeth can grow to resemble brain cells, suggesting they could one day be used in the brain as a therapy for stroke.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Towards an embodied science of intersubjectivity: Widening the scope of social understanding research

Towards an embodied science of intersubjectivity: Widening the scope of social understanding research | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

An important amount of research effort in psychology and neuroscience over the past decades has focused on the problem of social cognition. This problem is understood as how we figure out other minds, relying only on indirect manifestations of other people's intentional states, which are assumed to be hidden, private and internal. Research on this question has mostly investigated how individual cognitive mechanisms achieve this task. A shift in the internalist assumptions regarding intentional states has expanded the research focus with hypotheses that explore the role of interactive phenomena and interpersonal histories in conjunction with individual cognitive processes. 

This interactive expansion of the conceptual and methodological toolkit for investigating social cognition, we now propose, can be followed by an expansion into wider and deeply-related research questions, beyond (but including) that of social cognition narrowly construed. 

Our social lives are populated by different kinds of cognitive and affective phenomena that are related to but not exhausted by the question of how we figure out other minds. These phenomena include acting and perceiving together, verbal and non-verbal engagement, experiences of (dis-)connection, management of relations in a group, joint meaning-making, intimacy, trust, conflict, negotiation, asymmetric relations, material mediation of social interaction, collective action, contextual engagement with socio-cultural norms, structures and roles, etc. These phenomena are often characterized by a strong participation by the cognitive agent in contrast with the spectatorial stance of social cognition. We use the broader notion of embodied intersubjectivity to refer to this wider set of questions. 

This Research Topic aims to investigate relations between different intersubjective phenomena, to help lay strong foundations for a science of intersubjectivity – the social mind writ large. We encourage contributions in psychology, neuroscience, psychopathology, philosophy, and cognitive science that address this wider scope of intersubjectivity by extending the range of explanatory factors from purely individual to interactive, from observational to participatory. We welcome novel theoretical proposals and empirical or modeling methodologies that investigate embodied aspects of social interaction, including cross-disciplinary work. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

New Myelin Code Adds to Brain Complexity

New Myelin Code Adds to Brain Complexity | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Recently discovered great variations in the pattern and amount of myelin in the cortex shows that a new myelin code adds to brain complexity

Via iPamba
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Discovery: 'Kindness' gene so powerful it can be detected by strangers in 20 sec

Discovery: 'Kindness' gene so powerful it can be detected by strangers in 20 sec | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Is that man or woman across the bar someone you can trust or empathetic enough to spill out your story of pain and suffering to? Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have found compelling evidence that healthy humans are hard-wired to recognize empathetic strangers who can help them in 20 seconds.


In particular, researchers have focused on a hormone called oxytocin, which has been linked to emotions like love and trust and is found in a variety of animals. Higher levels of oxytocin have been linked to higher levels of trustworthiness, empathy and willingness to sacrifice, Kogan said.


Widely known as the “cuddle” or “love” hormone, oxytocin is secreted into the bloodstream and the brain, where it promotes social interaction, bonding and romantic love, among other functions.


========================

Higher levels of oxytocin have been linked

to higher levels of trustworthiness,

empathy and willingness to sacrifice

=============


by Tima Vlasto


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
Renata Hill's comment, April 29, 2014 4:03 PM
What a fascinating study. Thank you for the heads-up!
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Gut check: Microbes in our stomachs may be making us miserable

Gut check: Microbes in our stomachs may be making us miserable | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research suggests that certain kinds of stomach bacteria may be the source of our anxiety and depression
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Research illuminates ‘touchy’ subject: The Merkel cell responsible for sensing touch

Research illuminates ‘touchy’ subject: The Merkel cell responsible for sensing touch | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By solving a long standing scientific mystery, the common saying “you just hit a nerve” might need to be updated to “you just hit a Merkel cell,” jokes Jianguo Gu, PhD, a pain researcher at the University of Cincinnati (UC).
more...
No comment yet.