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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Empathy Video Games Change Players Thinking - CBS Miami

Empathy Video Games Change Players Thinking - CBS Miami | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
There is a new type of video game out and it’s one that doesn’t involve violence. Instead, players experience and fight ‘real life’ problems.
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The Missing Peace: Mindfulness Based Practice • Social Justice Solutions

The Missing Peace: Mindfulness Based Practice • Social Justice Solutions | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
“Certainly physics designed the bombs, biology the germ warfare, chemistry the nerve gas and so on, but it will be the unhealthy emotions of individuals that will trigger these horrors.
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Study with totally blind people shows how light helps activate the brain

Study with totally blind people shows how light helps activate the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Light enhances brain activity during a cognitive task even in some people who are totally blind, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Montreal and Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital.
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Why Can't We All Just Get Along? The Uncertain Biological Basis of Morality

Why Can't We All Just Get Along? The Uncertain Biological Basis of Morality | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Squaring recent research suggesting we're "naturally moral" with all the strife in the world. 

In 1999, Joshua Greene—then a philosophy graduate student at Princeton, now a psychology professor at Harvard—had a very fertile idea. He took a pretty well-known philosophical thought experiment and infused it with technology in a way that turned it into a very well-known philosophical thought experiment—easily the best-known, most-pondered such mental exercise of our time. In the process, he raised doubts, in inescapably vivid form, about the rationality of human moral judgment.

The thought experiment—called the trolley problem—has over the past few years gotten enough attention to be approaching “needs no introduction” status. But it’s not quite there, so: An out-of-control trolley is headed for five people who will surely die unless you pull a lever that diverts it onto a track where it will instead kill one person. Would you—should you—pull the lever?


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Stanford’s Altruism Research Is Funded by the Dalai Lama

Stanford’s Altruism Research Is Funded by the Dalai Lama | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
We can be healthier, live longer, and make the world a better place by exploring our potential for compassionate behavior, according to neurosurgeon James Doty, founder and director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education,...
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The Laughter Prescription

The Laughter Prescription | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
On a recent trip to Indonesia I came across a temple, in a small village outside of Ubhud, where a group of local Balinese were rolling around on yoga mats in fits of hysterical laughter.
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Cell nucleus protein in brown fat cells governs daily control of body temperature

Cell nucleus protein in brown fat cells governs daily control of body temperature | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
For nearly 300 years, investigators have known that body temperature follows a circadian, or 24-hour, rhythm, with a peak during the day and a low at night.
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BIG BRAIN: Brain Cortex Machine Part 1 - Intro

BIG BRAIN: Brain Cortex Machine Part 1 - Intro | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In this machine, the cortex will have primary functions that include memory, language, thinking, asking questions, volunteering information, carrying on a conversation in natural language, and learning.
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Neuroscience in crisis - BioEdge

Neuroscience in crisis - BioEdge | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Neuroscience in crisis
BioEdge
The good news is that two gigantic brain-mapping projects are underway in the US and in Europe, providing funding and jobs for countless projects.
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Emotional intelligence not always associated with prosociality

Emotional intelligence not always associated with prosociality | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Emotionally intelligent people have the ability to manipulate others to satisfy their own interest, according to new research published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, by Yuki Nozaki and...
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Benefits Of Ecotherapy: Being In Nature Fights Depression, Improves Mental Health And Wellbeing

Benefits Of Ecotherapy: Being In Nature Fights Depression, Improves Mental Health And Wellbeing | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Talking walks in nature reduces depression by a significant amount, researchers found.
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Researchers apply brainpower to understanding neural stem cell differentiation

Researchers apply brainpower to understanding neural stem cell differentiation | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
How do humans and other mammals get so brainy? USC researcher Wange Lu, PhD, and his colleagues shed new light on this question in a paper that will be published in Cell Reports on October 24.
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Stanford 2013 Roundtable panelists demystify the secrets of happiness

Stanford 2013 Roundtable panelists demystify the secrets of happiness | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The Roundtable convened a panel of psychologists, neuroscientists and business experts, with Katie Couric as moderator, to discuss what makes people happy.

Via VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG
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Self-compassion battles homesickness

Self-compassion battles homesickness | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The lack of self-compassion could be a contributing factor in the development of homesickness, according to a recent study.

 

Self-compassion is defined in the study as "the degree to which people treat themselves kindly during distressing situations." The study found that having self-compassion could potentially help many new college students adapt to campus life, thereby improving their overall college experience.

 

By Zarah Udwadia | 


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Why We're Wired To Connect

Why We're Wired To Connect | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By Gareth Cook(Click here for the original article) When we experience social pain — a snub, a cruel word — the feeling is as real as physical pain.
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'Ancient brain' helps us avoid accidents

'Ancient brain' helps us avoid accidents | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—Scientists at Australia's Vision Centre (VC) have found a group of rare cells in the human brain that recognise edges – helping us to avoid accidents and recognise everything we use or see in daily life.
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The World's Most Powerful MRI Takes Shape

The World's Most Powerful MRI Takes Shape | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

An MRI scanner equipped with a superconducting magnet strong enough to lift a 60-metric-ton battle tank will offer unprecedented images of the human brain when it comes on line a little more than a year from now, say its builders.

 

The imager’s superconducting electromagnet is designed to produce a field of 11.75 teslas, making it the world’s most powerful whole-body scanner.

 

Most standard hospital MRIs produce 1.5 or 3 T. A few institutions, including the University of Illinois at Chicago and Maastricht University, in the Netherlands, have recently installed human scanners that can reach 9.4 T. Superconducting magnets used in the Large Hadron Collider, which last year was used in the discovery of the Higgs boson, produce a field of 8.4 T.

 

The development of the scanner, known as INUMAC (for Imaging of Neuro disease Using high-field MR And Contrastophores), has been in progress since 2006 and is expected to cost €200 million, or about US $270 million. The project reached a key milestone this summer with delivery of more than 200 kilometers of superconducting cable, which is now being wound into coils that will produce the scanner’s magnetic field.

 

“We’re pretty proud of having met all the requirements, plus given them a little extra,” says Hem Kanithi, vice president of business development at Luvata, in Waterbury, Conn., which built the superconductor.

Standard hospital scanners have a spatial resolution of about 1 millimeter, covering about 10 000 neurons, and a time resolution of about a second. The INUMAC will be able to image an area of about 0.1 mm, or 1000 neurons, and see changes occurring as fast as one-tenth of a second, according to Pierre Védrine, director of the project at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, in Paris.

 

With this type of resolution, MRIs could detect early indications of brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s and perhaps measure the effects of any methods developed to treat those illnesses. It would also allow much more precise functional imaging of the brain at work than is currently available. “You cannot really discriminate today what is happening inside your brain at the level of a few hundred neurons,” Védrine says.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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11 new genetic susceptibility factors for Alzheimer's disease discovered

11 new genetic susceptibility factors for Alzheimer's disease discovered | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The largest international study ever conducted on Alzheimer's disease (AD), the I-GAP (International Genomics Alzheimer's Project) consortium has identified 11 new regions of the genome involved in the onset of this neurodegenerative disease.
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Fear: Why we love it, hate it and can't live without it - Lincoln Journal Star

Fear: Why we love it, hate it and can't live without it - Lincoln Journal Star | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Fear: Why we love it, hate it and can't live without it
Lincoln Journal Star
Or a false alarm? If it is the latter, the amygdala signals: All systems stand down. But regardless of whether the danger is real or not, the brain remembers.
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Neuroscientists discover new 'mini-neural computer' in the brain

Neuroscientists discover new 'mini-neural computer' in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Dendrites, the branch-like projections of neurons, were once thought to be passive wiring in the brain.
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Washing Your Hands Increases Optimism, But May Lower Your Motivation To Perform Well In The Future

Washing Your Hands Increases Optimism, But May Lower Your Motivation To Perform Well In The Future | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A German researcher finds physical cleansing after failing a task may enhance a person's optimism but it also weakened their performance on a future task.
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The Dark Side Of Emotional Intelligence - Huffington Post

The Dark Side Of Emotional Intelligence - Huffington Post | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The Dark Side Of Emotional Intelligence
Huffington Post
A supposedly "good" trait could have a dark side, according to a new study.
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The root of the problem: This is your brain on math - The Globe and Mail

The root of the problem: This is your brain on math - The Globe and Mail | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The root of the problem: This is your brain on math The Globe and Mail “As a society we have paid more attention to reading in the past few decades,” says Daniel Ansari, Canada Research Chair in developmental cognitive neuroscientist and head of...
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Miserable & Magical: A Graduation Speech for Paradoxical Times, by Nipun Mehta

Miserable & Magical: A Graduation Speech for Paradoxical Times, by Nipun Mehta | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When the student body of an elite private school in Silicon Valley was given the chance to vote on who would give their graduation address, their first pick was Nipun Mehta.
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When do medical students lose their empathy?

When do medical students lose their empathy? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It’s common knowledge among third year medical students that statistically a lot of us are mentally damaged in some way.
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