Social Neuroscien...
Follow
Find
2.5K views | +0 today
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Avatar therapy for schizophrenia

Use of avatars helps quieten voices heard by schizophrenia patients
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Carry The One Radio: Chronic pain is a disease

Carry The One Radio: Chronic pain is a disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A neuroscientist discusses the disease of pain
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Carry The One Radio: Neural circuits and motivational processes underlying hunger

Carry The One Radio: Neural circuits and motivational processes underlying hunger | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A chemist turned neuroscientist maps the motivational state of hunger
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Empathy Interview: Helen Weng & Edwin Rutsch: How to Build a Culture of Empathy & Compassion

Empathy Interview: Helen Weng & Edwin Rutsch: How to Build a Culture of Empathy & Compassion | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Helen Weng is currently a doctoral student in clinical psychology studying the Department of Psychology, Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, and Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

 

Her long-term goals include studying how interventions that increase love and compassion impact both psychological and physical health in patients, and how training these qualities in health care providers can prevent burnout and improve patient outcomes.

 

Helen conducted a study titled,  Compassion Training Alters Altruism and Neural Responses to Suffering. "Compassion is a key motivator of altruistic behavior, but little is known about individuals’ capacity to cultivate compassion through training. We examined whether compassion may be systematically trained by testing whether (a) short-term compassion training increases altruistic behavior and (b) individual differences in altruism are associated with training-induced changes in neural responses to suffering. "

 

Culture of Empathy Builder:  Helen Y. Weng

 http://j.mp/17RkrF1


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Strengthen Your Selflessness

Strengthen Your Selflessness | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Can you cultivate compassion? Researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison seem to think so—and with good reason.

Their study, published in Psychological Science, hypothesized that compassion can be taught and boost a person’s well-being, as well as their altruistic behavior, or selflessness.

 

To test this theory, researchers randomly assigned 41 participants to undergo one of two trainings: compassion or reappraisal. Both can promote well-being, but compassion training increases empathy and reappraisal training decreases a person’s distress level.

By Stephanie Castillo


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
John Michel's curator insight, June 16, 2013 9:09 PM

Can you cultivate compassion? Researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison seem to think so—and with good reason.

Their study, published in Psychological Science, hypothesized that compassion can be taught and boost a person’s well-being, as well as their altruistic behavior, or selflessness.


Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

The Unconscious: Freud's Gift to Neuroscience | In Their Own Words | Big Think

The Unconscious: Freud's Gift to Neuroscience | In Their Own Words | Big Think | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The idea that there's this massive amount happening under the hood came from Freud. 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neuroscience in The News
Scoop.it!

NeuroDojo: Neuroscience doesn't need a grand theory to advance

NeuroDojo: Neuroscience doesn't need a grand theory to advance | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
That doesn't sound like a theory of the brain. That sounds like what is desired is a theory of consciousness. This does not surprise me; it's the big hairy audacious goal for many neuroscientists. I have a message for my fellow ...

Via Rhoda Floyd
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Braingasm: How Porn "Shuts Down" Women's Brains | Think Tank | Big Think

Braingasm: How Porn "Shuts Down" Women's Brains | Think Tank | Big Think | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What really goes on in a brain-on-porn? A recent study conducted at the University of Groningen Medical Center came to a surprising conclusion.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Penn Researchers design variant of main painkiller receptor | Science Codex

Penn Researchers design variant of main painkiller receptor | Science Codex | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Opioids, such as morphine, are still the most effective class of painkillers, but they come with unwanted side effects and can also be addictive and deadly at high doses.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

How poverty might change the brain

How poverty might change the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Martha Farah has studied vision, brain-enhancing drugs and socioeconomic influences on the brain, among other topics.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Stanford's Sapolsky On Depression in U.S. (Full Lecture)

Stanford Professor Robert Sapolsky, posits that depression is the most damaging disease that you can experience. Right now it is the number four cause of dis...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Can Olive Oil Prevent Alzheimer's? Compound Oleocanthal Blocks And Degrades Disease-Causing Peptide

Can Olive Oil Prevent Alzheimer's? Compound Oleocanthal Blocks And Degrades Disease-Causing Peptide | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
An olive oil compound called oleocanthal may help prevent Alzheimer's due to its ability to clear beta-amyloid plaque from the brain.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

'The worst case of scientific censorship since the Catholic Church banned the works of Galileo': Scientists call for drugs to be legalised to allow proper study of their properties

'The worst case of scientific censorship since the Catholic Church banned the works of Galileo': Scientists call for drugs to be legalised to allow proper study of their properties | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The outlawing of drugs such as cannabis, MDMA and LSD amounts to the “the worst case of scientific censorship since the Catholic Church banned the works of Copernicus and Galileo”, the former Government drugs advisor Professor David...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Virtual Conversation Coach Helps Overcome Social Awkwardness, Public Speaking Anxiety [VIDEO]

Virtual Conversation Coach Helps Overcome Social Awkwardness, Public Speaking Anxiety [VIDEO] | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
An automated conversation coach helps socially anxious users practice speaking skills for job interviews, dates, public speeches, and other settings.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Carry The One Radio: How does the brain motivate us to move?

Carry The One Radio: How does the brain motivate us to move? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A neuroscientist explains movement and motivation
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Animals
Scoop.it!

Empathy and Disgust Do Battle in the Brain: Scientific American

Empathy and Disgust Do Battle in the Brain: Scientific American | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

An injured rat helps us understand the struggle between empathy and disgust

 

Evolutionary theorists believe that many of our behaviors are adaptive in some way. "Empathy probably started out as a mechanism to improve maternal care," saysFrans de Waal, a primatologist at Emory University and author of The Age of Empathy. "Mammalian mothers who were attentive to their young’s needs were more likely to rear successful offspring."

 

These offspring were, in turn, more likely to reproduce, so being able to sense another’s feelings was beneficial because it helped mammals to pass on their genes—the ultimate prize in the game of life. Mammalian males also show empathy, de Waal says, because “the mechanism spread from mother-offspring to other relations, including friends."

 

By Arielle Duhaime-Ross


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Study: Reading novels makes us better thinkers

Study: Reading novels makes us better thinkers | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research says reading literary fiction helps people embrace ambiguous ideas and avoid snap judgments
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Baldness Drug Curbs Men's Interest in Alcohol, Study Suggests

Baldness Drug Curbs Men's Interest in Alcohol, Study Suggests | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Almost two-thirds of the men in the study said they were drinking less after taking Propecia.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Supercomputers and analytics: Figuring out the human brain | The Raw Story

Supercomputers and analytics: Figuring out the human brain | The Raw Story | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Heading Soccer Balls Tied to Damaging Brain Changes - Child Development and Parenting: Middle Childhood

Heading Soccer Balls Tied to Damaging Brain Changes - Child Development and Parenting: Middle Childhood | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Doing it a lot may increase risk of memory problems in adult soccer players, study says.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

How Reading Fiction Helps You Think Better | IdeaFeed | Big Think

How Reading Fiction Helps You Think Better | IdeaFeed | Big Think | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A University of Toronto study showed that people who read literary fiction have less need for "cognitive closure," allowing for more creative and sophisticated thinking.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Top brain scientist is 'philosopher at heart'

Top brain scientist is 'philosopher at heart' | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Ed Boyden is only 33, but he's already helped invent influential technologies in the study of the human brain.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Researchers Develop First Test to Accurately Evaluate Motivations Behind Suicide

Researchers Develop First Test to Accurately Evaluate Motivations Behind Suicide | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new questionnaire is the first accurate and scientifically tested tool for evaluating a person's motivation for attempting suicide.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Depression Biomarker Study: Using Brain Scans to Help Choose Treatment Type

Emory clinical neuroscientists study brain scans in effort to find better ways to help patients recover from depression.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Deep brain stimulation studied as last-ditch obesity treatment

Deep brain stimulation studied as last-ditch obesity treatment | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(HealthDay)—For the first time, researchers have shown that implanting electrodes in the brain's "feeding center" can be safely done—in a bid to develop a new treatment option for severely obese people who fail to shed pounds even after weight-loss...
more...
No comment yet.