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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Q&A: Neuroscientist Eric R. Kandel on the biology of mind - Los Angeles Times

Q&A: Neuroscientist Eric R. Kandel on the biology of mind - Los Angeles Times | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Q&A: Neuroscientist Eric R. Kandel on the biology of mind
Los Angeles Times
Neuroscientist and Nobel laureate Eric R. Kandel is haunted by his childhood memory of Nazis expelling his family from Vienna.
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'Love hormone' may play wider role in social interaction than previously thought - Toronto NewsFIX

'Love hormone' may play wider role in social interaction than previously thought - Toronto NewsFIX | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
'Love hormone' may play wider role in social interaction than previously thought Toronto NewsFIX Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown that oxytocin – often referred to as “the love hormone” because of its importance...
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Study finds altered brain connections in epilepsy patients

Study finds altered brain connections in epilepsy patients | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Patients with the most common form of focal epilepsy have widespread, abnormal connections in their brains that could provide clues toward diagnosis and treatment, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.
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Glowing Worms Illuminate Roots of Behavior in Animals

Glowing Worms Illuminate Roots of Behavior in Animals | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Researchers develop novel method to image worm brain activity and screen early stage compounds aimed at treating autism and anxiety. A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and The Rockefeller University in New York has developed a novel system to image brain activity in multiple awake and unconstrained worms. The technology, which makes it possible to study the genetics and neural circuitry associated with animal behavior, can also be used as a high-throughput screening tool for drug development targeting autism, anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and other brain disorders. The team details their technology and early results in the paper "High-throughput imaging of neuronal activity in Caenorhabditis elegans," published on-line in advance of print by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . "One of our major objectives is to understand the neural signals that direct behavior—how sensory information is processed through a network of neurons leading to specific decisions and responses," said Dirk Albrecht, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at WPI and senior author of the paper. Albrecht led the research team both at WPI and at Rockefeller, where he served previously as a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of Cori Bargmann, PhD, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and a co-author of the new paper. To study neuronal activity, Albrecht’s lab uses the tiny worm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a nematode found in many environments around the world. A typical adult C. elegans is just 1 millimeter long and has 969 cells, of which 302 are neurons. Despite its small size, the worm is a complex organism able to do all of the things animals must do to survive. It can move, eat, mate, and process environmental cues that help it forage for food or react to threats. As a bonus for researchers, C.elegans is transparent. By using various imaging technologies, including optical microscopes, one can literally see into the worm and watch physiological processes in real time. In addition to watching the head neurons light up as they picked up odor cues, the new system can trace signaling through "interneurons." These are pathways that connect external sensors to the rest of the network (the "worm brain") and send signals to muscle cells that adjust the worm's movement based on the cues. Numerous brain disorders in people are believed to arise when neural networks malfunction. In some cases the malfunction is dramatic overreaction to a routine stimulus, while in others it is a lack of appropriate reactions to important cues. Since C. elegans and humans share many of the same genes, discovering genetic causes for differing neuronal responses in worms could be applicable to human physiology. Experimental compounds designed to modulate the action of nerve cells and neuronal networks could be tested first on worms using Albrecht’s new system. The compounds would be infused in the worm arena, along with other stimuli, and the reaction of the worms’ nervous systems could be imaged and analyzed.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Tom Perran
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Tom Perran's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:46 PM
Fascinating and promising new research!
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Behavior Brief - Scientist (blog)

Behavior Brief - Scientist (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientist (blog) Behavior Brief Scientist (blog) Adult male Drosophila melanogaster exhibit elevated levels of aggression in the presence of mating partners, though prior exposure to females can suppress aggressive behaviors, according to a study...
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Why Do Human Beings Do Good Things? The Puzzle of Altruism

Why Do Human Beings Do Good Things? The Puzzle of Altruism | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Altruism isn't always just disguised self-interest. 'Pure' altruism does exist. (RT @bruceparry: Why Do Human Beings Do Good Things?

Via Jeanie DeMullet
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Surprising Differences Seen In Brains Of Social Butterflies

Surprising Differences Seen In Brains Of Social Butterflies | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
SAN DIEGO — Being a social butterfly just might change your brain: In people with a large network of friends and excellent social skills, certain brain regions are bigger and better connected than in people with fewer friends, a new study...
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New study finds that individuals with Asperger's Syndrome don’t lack empathy - in fact if anything they empathize too much

New study finds that individuals with Asperger's Syndrome don’t lack empathy - in fact if anything they empathize too much | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
“A ground-breaking study suggests people with autism-spectrum disorders such as Asperger's do not lack empathy – rather, they feel others' emotions too intensely to cope.” “People with Asperger's s...
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Western University scientists discover a novel opiate addiction switch in the ... - Toronto NewsFIX

Western University scientists discover a novel opiate addiction switch in the ... - Toronto NewsFIX | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Toronto NewsFIX
Western University scientists discover a novel opiate addiction switch in the ...
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Social Neuroscience: People Need People

Social Neuroscience: People Need People | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Science daily articles Living Alone Associated With Higher Risk of Mortality, Cardiovascular Death Loneliness in Older Individuals Linked to Functional Decline, Death The REduction of Atherothrombo...
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Beware The Brain-Science Backlash

Beware The Brain-Science Backlash | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

“ After decades of watching neuroscience move from being a strange stepsister of psychology to cutting-edge medical research, the inevitable backlash is in full swing.”


Via Neil Gains, Emre Erdogan
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Five Surprising Ways Oxytocin Shapes Your Social Life

Five Surprising Ways Oxytocin Shapes Your Social Life | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research is finding that oxytocin doesn’t just bond us to mothers, lovers, and friends—it also seems to play a role in excluding others from that bond.
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Dana Foundation Blog: Design a Brain Experiment Competition Deadline: January 17

It's not too early to start thinking about creative ideas for the Dana Foundation's Design a Brain Experiment competition for high school students. Cash prizes!
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Brain study offers “intriguing clues toward new therapies” for psychiatric disorders

Brain study offers “intriguing clues toward new therapies” for psychiatric disorders | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Over on Science Now today, Los Angeles Times writer Geoffrey Mohan describes how neuroscientists here have “for the first time traced how three brain networks mediate the mind’s internal focus and its processing of stimuli from the outside world.”...
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Surgeons Find New Method to Reduce Risk of Blood Clots During Brain Traumas

Surgeons Find New Method to Reduce Risk of Blood Clots During Brain Traumas | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers discover a new protocol, which uses preventive blood thinners in the treatment of patients with TBI, lowers the risk of the patients developing fatal blood clots without increasing the risk of intracranial bleeding.
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The functional and structural neural basis of individual differences in loss aversion | CRESA

The functional and structural neural basis of individual differences in loss aversion | CRESA | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Decision making under risk entails the anticipation of prospective outcomes, typically leading to the greater sensitivity to losses than gains known as loss aversion. Previous studies on the neural bases of choice-outcome anticipation and loss aversion provided inconsistent results, showing either bidirectional mesolimbic responses of activation for gains and deactivation for losses, or a specific amygdala involvement in processing losses. Here we focused on loss aversion with the aim to address interindividual differences in the neural bases of choice-outcome anticipation. Fifty-six healthy human participants accepted or rejected 104 mixed gambles offering equal (50%) chances of gaining or losing different amounts of money while their brain activity was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We report both bidirectional and gain/loss-specific responses while evaluating risky gambles, with amygdala and posterior insula specifically tracking the magnitude of potential losses. At the individual level, loss aversion was reflected both in limbic fMRI responses and in gray matter volume in a structural amygdala–thalamus–striatum network, in which the volume of the “output” centromedial amygdala nuclei mediating avoidance behavior was negatively correlated with monetary performance. We conclude that outcome anticipation and ensuing loss aversion involve multiple neural systems, showing functional and structural individual variability directly related to the actual financial outcomes of choices. By supporting the simultaneous involvement of both appetitive and aversive processing in economic decision making, these results contribute to the interpretation of existing inconsistencies on the neural bases of anticipating choice outcomes.


Via Alessandro Cerboni, Emre Erdogan
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Can Herbal Extracts Fend Off Alzheimer's Disease? Spearmint And Rosemary Compounds May Boost Memory, Learning

Can Herbal Extracts Fend Off Alzheimer's Disease? Spearmint And Rosemary Compounds May Boost Memory, Learning | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Herbal extracts from spearmint and rosemary may help offset biological factors thought to underpin neurodegenerative illnesses like Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia.
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Despite what you've been told, you aren't 'left-brained' or 'right-brained'

Despite what you've been told, you aren't 'left-brained' or 'right-brained' | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Amy Novotney: The brain is more complex than corporate team-building exercises suggest, but the myth is unlikely to die anytime soon
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Sex is Better for Women in Love: Scientific American

Reward areas in the brain are tied to orgasm quality
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How families and feelings built human culture – Stephen Asma – Aeon

How families and feelings built human culture – Stephen Asma – Aeon | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The evolution of human culture can be explained, not by the size of our brains, but by the quality of our relationships
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Neuronal Dendrites Can Process Information Solo | I Fucking Love Science

Neuronal Dendrites Can Process Information Solo | I Fucking Love Science | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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Want To Be More Empathic? Skip Lunch.

Want To Be More Empathic? Skip Lunch. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study suggests that people who are hungry are more supportive of social welfare.
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empathy triad - Daniel Goleman’s new book

empathy triad - Daniel Goleman’s new book | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Daniel Goleman’s new book, Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence, takes the idea even further. Understanding his “Empathy Triad” may help you become not only a better persuader but maybe even a better person as well.


Goleman’s empathy triad comprises three forms of attention: cognitive empathy, emotional empathy, and empathetic caring.

 

Cognitive empathy is the closest to what I call outside-in thinking. Essentially, it’s paying attention to the other person’s thought processes and emotions, of knowing what they’re thinking and feeling, and being able to incorporate that into your persuasive approach. Another term for it is perspective taking, which is the ability to see the situation from the point of view of another person. It’s a skill that may be unique to humans, and begins to develop around the time we are three years old and ends only when we attain positions of power.

 



Via Edwin Rutsch
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