Social Neuroscience Advances
5.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Scientists take totally tubular journey through brain cells

Scientists take totally tubular journey through brain cells | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In a new study, scientists at the National Institutes of Health took a molecular-level journey into microtubules, the hollow cylinders inside brain cells that act as skeletons and internal highways.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

Inside the adult ADHD brain | McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT

Inside the adult ADHD brain | McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Via iPamba
more...
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, June 13, 2014 12:33 AM

The non-synchrony between parts of Default mode network (posterior cingulate / medial PFC) continues in adulthood for those who have adult ADHD.

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Oxytocin helps old muscle work like new, study finds

Oxytocin helps old muscle work like new, study finds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
UC Berkeley researchers have discovered that oxytocin — a hormone associated with maternal nurturing, social attachments, childbirth and sex — is indispensable for healthy muscle maintenance and repair. It is the latest target for development into a potential treatment for age-related muscle wasting.


A few other biochemical factors in blood have been connected to aging and disease in recent years, but oxytocin is the first anti-aging molecule identified that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for clinical use in humans, the researchers said. Pitocin, a synthetic form of oxytocin, is already used to help with labor and to control bleeding after childbirth. Clinical trials of an oxytocin nasal spray are also underway to alleviate symptoms associated with mental disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and dementia.


“Unfortunately, most of the molecules discovered so far to boost tissue regeneration are also associated with cancer, limiting their potential as treatments for humans,” said study principal investigator Irina Conboy, associate professor of bioengineering. “Our quest is to find a molecule that not only rejuvenates old muscle and other tissue, but that can do so sustainably long-term without increasing the risk of cancer.”


Conboy and her research team say that oxytocin, secreted into the blood by the brain’s pituitary gland, is a good candidate because it is a broad range hormone that reaches every organ, and it is not known to be associated with tumors or to interfere with the immune system.


The new study determined that in mice, blood levels of oxytocin declined with age. They also showed that there are fewer receptors for oxytocin in muscle stem cells in old versus young mice.


To tease out oxytocin’s role in muscle repair, the researchers injected the hormone under the skin of old mice for four days, and then for five days more after the muscles were injured. After the nine-day treatment, they found that the muscles of the mice that had received oxytocin injections healed far better than those of a control group of mice without oxytocin.


“The action of oxytocin was fast,” said Elabd. “The repair of muscle in the old mice was at about 80 percent of what we saw in the young mice.”


Interestingly, giving young mice an extra boost of oxytocin did not seem to cause a significant change in muscle regeneration.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from With My Right Brain
Scoop.it!

The Neuroscience of Decision Making Explained in 30 Seconds | Science Blogs | WIRED

The Neuroscience of Decision Making Explained in 30 Seconds | Science Blogs | WIRED | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Is it possible to explain the neuroscience of decision making in 30 seconds? Wired Science blogger Christian Jarrett gives it his best shot.

Via Emre Erdogan
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Neuroscientists Join the Open-Source Hardware Movement

Neuroscientists Join the Open-Source Hardware Movement | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Photo: Open Ephys
Graduate students Josh Siegle and Jakob Voigts were planning an ambitious series of experiments at their MIT neuroscience labs in 2011 when they ran into a problem.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

DAVID KEISLER: The moral molecule - Aiken Standard

DAVID KEISLER: The moral molecule - Aiken Standard | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it


Oxytocin is a mammalian hormone produced in the brain by the hypothalamus and stored and secreted by the posterior pituitary gland. It has been reported to act as a neuromodulator in the brain.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neuroscience in The News
Scoop.it!

Brain-mapping projects to join forces

Brain-mapping projects to join forces | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

US and European research programmes will begin coordinating research.

 

It seems a natural pairing, almost like the hemispheres of a human brain: two controversial and ambitious projects that seek to decipher the body's control center are poised to join forces.

The European Union’s €1-billion (US$1.3-billion) Human Brain Project (HBP) and the United States’ $1-billion Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative will launch a collaboration later this year, according to government officials involved in both projects.(...) - by Sara Reardon, Nature, 18 March 2014


Via Julien Hering, PhD, Rhoda Floyd
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

“Cuddle Hormone” Oxytocin Found to Increase with Use of Social Media | Health

“Cuddle Hormone” Oxytocin Found to Increase with Use of Social Media | Health | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It seems startling, but a California scientist has made an interesting discovery about how we connect with our social circles. It seems the brain can’t tell the difference between ‘real’ social interaction like kissing, hugging, talking to someone...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Depression, lifestyle choices shown to adversely affect memory across age groups

Depression, lifestyle choices shown to adversely affect memory across age groups | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Have trouble remember where you put your keys? Forgetting the names of familiar faces?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Scientists Just Discovered a Revolutionary Way to Treat Depression

Scientists Just Discovered a Revolutionary Way to Treat Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
And it's not just a handful of pills.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

A Tiny Molecule May Help Battle Depression

A Tiny Molecule May Help Battle Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Levels of a small molecule found only in humans and in other primates are lower in the brains of depressed individuals, according to researchers at McGill University and the Douglas Institute.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Researchers Close In on the Dream of a Safe, Portable Brain Scanner - Singularity Hub

Researchers Close In on the Dream of a Safe, Portable Brain Scanner - Singularity Hub | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it


The researchers, led by Joseph Culver, a radiologist at Washington University of St.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Analysis of Neuron 'Traffic Jams' in Brain May Help Treat Diseases

Analysis of Neuron 'Traffic Jams' in Brain May Help Treat Diseases | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The molecular equivalent of traffic jams – a cluster of nerve cells inside the brain – can potentially be the result of cellular degeneration and death. Researchers from the University of Buffalo examined these blockages in the brains of fruit flies.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

New Insight into How the Brain Regulates Its Blood Flow

New Insight into How the Brain Regulates Its Blood Flow | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers report they have identified a new component of the biological mechanism which controls blood flow in the brain.

 

"The blush of the brain. Red hue shows the increase in the amount of blood in the brain (total hemoglobin concentration) in response to stimulation. This response extends up along surface arteries in a wave of dilation that travels over a millimeter in less than half a second. This ‘brain blush’ provides the contrast seen in fMRI images, and is essential for normal brain function. The green vessel crossing the responding region is a draining vein. Veins exhibit very little diameter change in response to normal stimulation, acting as passive drains of increased blood flow. Credit Elizabeth Hillman"


Via iPamba
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

MRI Brain Scans Detect People with Early Parkinson's

MRI Brain Scans Detect People with Early Parkinson's | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a simple MRI technique which could help with early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.

Via iPamba
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from With My Right Brain
Scoop.it!

Mechanism Explains Complex Brain Wiring

Mechanism Explains Complex Brain Wiring | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research helps explain how the wiring of highly branched neurons in the brain works.

Via Emre Erdogan
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Spectrum Health among first to implant neurostimulator for epilepsy

Spectrum Health among first to implant neurostimulator for epilepsy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Spectrum Health is the first health system in Michigan and among the first in the nation to successfully implant a recently FDA-approved device that uses electric stimulation of the brain to treat adult epilepsy patients whose seizures have not...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Phenomena: - National Geographic

Phenomena: - National Geographic | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it


You may have heard of oxytocin as a love drug, or as a moral molecule.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neuroscience_technics
Scoop.it!

Single-cell axotomy of cultured hippocampal neurons integrated in neuronal circuits

Single-cell axotomy of cultured hippocampal neurons integrated in neuronal circuits | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

An understanding of the molecular mechanisms of axon regeneration after injury is key for the development of potential therapies. Single-cell axotomy of dissociated neurons enables the study of the intrinsic regenerative capacities of injured axons. This protocol describes how to perform single-cell axotomy on dissociated hippocampal neurons containing synapses. Furthermore, to axotomize hippocampal neurons integrated in neuronal circuits, we describe how to set up coculture with a few fluorescently labeled neurons. This approach allows axotomy of single cells in a complex neuronal network and the observation of morphological and molecular changes during axon regeneration. Thus, single-cell axotomy of mature neurons is a valuable tool for gaining insights into cell intrinsic axon regeneration and the plasticity of neuronal polarity of mature neurons. Dissociation of the hippocampus and plating of hippocampal neurons takes ∼2 h. Neurons are then left to grow for 2 weeks, during which time they integrate into neuronal circuits. Subsequent axotomy takes 10 min per neuron and further imaging takes 10 min per neuron. - by Gomis-Rüth S et al., Nature Protocols  9, 1028–1037 (2014) 


Via Julien Hering, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neuroscience in The News
Scoop.it!

Biomarkers could predict Alzheimer's before it starts

Biomarkers could predict Alzheimer's before it starts | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Study identifies potential blood test for cognitive decline.

A simple blood test has the potential to predict whether a healthy person will develop symptoms of dementia within two or three years. If larger studies uphold the results, the test could fill a major gap in strategies to combat brain degeneration, which is thought to show symptoms only at a stage when it too late to treat effectively. (...) - by Alison Abbott, Nature, 09 March 2014


Via Julien Hering, PhD, Rhoda Floyd
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Meaningful Activities Protect the Brain From Depression

Meaningful Activities Protect the Brain From Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study of adolescents found that those who derive joy from selfless deeds were less likely to be depressed over time. (Meaningful work and the brain.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Bacteria help explain why stress, fear trigger heart attacks

Bacteria help explain why stress, fear trigger heart attacks | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists believe they have an explanation for the axiom that stress, emotional shock, or overexertion may trigger heart attacks in vulnerable people.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from With My Right Brain
Scoop.it!

History of neuroscience: Paul Broca

History of neuroscience: Paul Broca | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Pierre Paul Broca

In April of 1861, a 51-year old man was transferred to Paul Broca's
surgical ward in a hospital in France.

Via Emre Erdogan
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Longer Telomeres Linked to Risk of Brain Cancer

Longer Telomeres Linked to Risk of Brain Cancer | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research reveals two common gene variants which lead to longer telomeres also significantly increase the risk of developing gliomas.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Neuron Tells Stem Cells to Grow New Neurons

Neuron Tells Stem Cells to Grow New Neurons | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Duke researchers have found a new type of neuron in the adult brain that is capable of telling stem cells to make more new neurons.
more...
No comment yet.