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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Study suggests brain is hard-wired for chronic pain

Study suggests brain is hard-wired for chronic pain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The structure of the brain may predict whether a person will suffer chronic low back pain, according to researchers who used brain scans.
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Science of the bloody brain

Science of the bloody brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Luigi Cane literally had a hole in his head. A brick had unforgivingly fallen on the back of it, smashing a section of his skull like a spoon knocking the shell off the top of a hard-boiled egg. An...
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Functional genetic variation in humans: Comprehensive map published

Functional genetic variation in humans: Comprehensive map published | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
European scientists, led by researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE)'s Faculty of Medicine in the context of the GEUVADIS project, today present a map that points to the genetic causes of differences between people.
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How To Pull Others Closer And Feel Better Together

How To Pull Others Closer And Feel Better Together | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
are good news in ways that pull others closer, bring out their better side, and boost happiness, camaraderie, reputation and mutual support. Mutuality matters. See how Huffington Post Good News section is benefitting in these ways, and you can too.
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Concussions' Lingering Effects Linked to Hormone Deficiency: Scientific American

The finding may explain why even seemingly mild concussions can give rise to persistent maladies
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Human Touch Sensitivity Extends to Nanoscale down to 12 nanometers, smaller than the size of a ribosome

Human Touch Sensitivity Extends to Nanoscale down to 12 nanometers, smaller than the size of a ribosome | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Your sense of touch is way more sophisticated than you can imagine. A new study indicates that our tactile capacity extends far beyond our visual range, allowing us to detect objects on the nanoscale. Researchers believe that the findings may inspire new developments in a wide variety of fields. 

 

The new study, published today in the Nature journal Scientific Reports, sought to appraise the human sense of touch in terms of our capacity to differentiate rough and smooth stimuli. Together with a group of psychologists, material scientists evaluated the test subjects’ ability to detect miniscule “bumps” along a smooth surface. According to lead researcher Mark Rutland of the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, the surprising findings shed new light on a traditionally overlooked faculty. 

 

"What you're capable of sensing and how you use your finger to sense a surface, up until recently has been a little bit of black art," he explained to ABC Science. "There are other stimuli like heat, cold, wetness, but we've excluded them just to be able to focus on the topographical stuff."

 

To test the hypothesis, the researchers enrolled 20 volunteers in an experiment. After being blindfolded, the participants were asked to run their index finger across 16 polymer surfaces featuring a series of tiny, parallel ridges. The height of these ridges ranged from 7 nanometers to 4.5 micrometers, and their wavelengths from 300 nanometers to 90 micrometers. 

 

For reference, a nanometer is 1×10−3 micrometer, or one thousandth of a micrometer. A micrometer is one thousandth of a millimeter, or about 0.000004 inches. "The participants could distinguish a surface which had a 13-nanometre average amplitude from a smooth surface," Rutland told reporters. "I was surprised and very very excited."

 

The research team has every right to be excited. The nanometer is a tremendously minute unit used to measure worlds far beyond those perceived by the eye. The scale measures viral activity, unfolding chemistry, and the wavelength of light. A ribosome, for example, is about 20 nanometers in diameter. 

 

While the electronics industry and its booming touchscreen technology may stand to benefit the most from the findings, Rutland is confident that virtually all industries will value a more sophisticated understanding of touch.

 

"This shows unambiguously that the human finger, with its coarse fingerprint structure in the sub-millimeter range, is capable of dynamically detecting surface structures many orders of magnitude smaller," the researchers say.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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New Papers on Moral Cognition - Experimental Philosophy

New Papers on Moral Cognition - Experimental Philosophy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Some readers might be interested in two new papers on moral cognition I recently posted to the web. The first is a short review of Patricia Chuchland's book, Braintrust: What Neuroscience Teaches Us About Morality.
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Information Processing: Genetic architecture of schizophrenia and related psychiatric disorders

Information Processing: Genetic architecture of schizophrenia and related psychiatric disorders | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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Dana Foundation Blog: Design a Brain Experiment Competition Is Back!

The design a brain experiment competition is back for its third year.
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Neurolearning: Mathematical Minds

Neurolearning: Mathematical Minds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"Most mathematicians did not just take up math as a "job"...(most) get more pleasure out of mathematics than almost any other activity. And they often discovered this pleasure when they were young". While most people would agree that "math people" are not like "non-math people", it's not always easy for non-mathematical minds to recognize (and appropriately nurture) mathematical ones.

http://tinyurl.com/7q7aqxa

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Friends connect on a genetic level : Nature News

Social scientists reveal genetic patterns in social networks.

 

Via VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG
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Unlocking the Mysteries of The Artistic Mind

It might seem bizarre that science is using art to learn about the mind—looking for hard facts in the most ethereal of places. But great artists turn out to be the world's first neuroscientists.
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Pinpointing molecular path that makes antidepressants act quicker in mouse model

Pinpointing molecular path that makes antidepressants act quicker in mouse model | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The reasons behind why it often takes people several weeks to feel the effect of newly prescribed antidepressants remains somewhat of a mystery – and likely, a frustration to both patients and physicians.
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Brain pathways tie together mental maps

Brain pathways tie together mental maps | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
To find its way in the world, your brain has to decipher a set of directions muddled by different points of view.
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Evolution of the 'Social Brain' in Humans: What Are the Benefits and Costs of Belonging to a Social Species?

Evolution of the 'Social Brain' in Humans: What Are the Benefits and Costs of Belonging to a Social Species? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Because the human brain has become so large and sophisticated in terms of the social computations it supports, it takes a very long time for it to develop fully.
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Schizophrenia: It's in the wiring of the brain

Schizophrenia: It's in the wiring of the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Just as wires must be insulated to effectively carry electrical impulses, nerve cells must be insulated by myelin to effectively transmit neural impulses.
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Researchers discover how and where imagination occurs in human brains

Researchers discover how and where imagination occurs in human brains | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Philosophers and scientists have long puzzled over where human imagination comes from. In other words, what makes humans able to create art, invent tools, think scientifically and perform other incredibly diverse behaviors?
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The Seductive Allure of Neuroscience and the Science of Persuasion | MIND Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

The Seductive Allure of Neuroscience and the Science of Persuasion | MIND Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
On the heels of the decade of the brain and the development of neuroimaging, it is nearly impossible to open a science magazine or walk through ...
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Frontiers | Dopaminergic drug effects during reversal learning depend on anatomical connections between the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala | Frontiers in Decision Neuroscience

Dopamine in the striatum is known to be important for reversal learning. However, the striatum does not act in isolation and reversal learning is also well accepted to depend on the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the amygdala.
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Brain Matters! “Brain Science and Social Responsibility” | CLBB

Brain Matters! “Brain Science and Social Responsibility” | CLBB | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Larry Young is the William P. Timmie professor in the Department of Psychiatry, the director of the Center for Translational Social Neuroscience at Emory University, and Chief of the Division of Behavioral Neuroscience and ...
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People Find Selflessness Attractive, Study Reports

People Find Selflessness Attractive, Study Reports | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In a new study, researchers found that when people looked for long-term partners, they rated altruism as an attractive trait.
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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, September 15, 2013 6:45 AM

When it comes to finding a partner for life, there are certain characteristics that people look for. Even though people might report that they look for different things in their potential mates, ranging from physical appearance to intelligence, researchers have found that certain traits seem to be attractive to the majority of people. Some of these traits include honesty and loyalty. Now, according to new research done by a team from the University of Nottingham and Liverpool John Moores University in the United Kingdom, altruism or selfless behavior can also be considered a very attractive trait.

Miguel Garcia's curator insight, September 15, 2013 8:33 AM

empathy or selective empathy? 

Laura Brown's comment, September 15, 2013 11:16 AM
Of course they find selflessness attractive. It's great to have someone do your bidding and not complain about it.
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Molecular imaging opens up a vast new world for neuroscience

Molecular imaging opens up a vast new world for neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Molecular imaging allows molecules in a living organism to be visualized, and provides a means of observing the distribution and behavior of molecules.

 

“The biggest advantage of molecular imaging using positron emission tomography lies in its applicability to humans.” says Yosky Kataoka, team leader of the Cellular Function Imaging Laboratory at the RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science. Molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) is expected to contribute to the diagnosis of disease, as well as to our understanding of pathologic conditions and therapeutic effects, and to the development of new drugs. It is already being used to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease and cancer. In October 2009, Kataoka’s laboratory announced a groundbreaking achievement that could lead to the development of a diagnostic method for migraine. While many people suffer from migraine, no objective method for diagnosis or treatment has been found so far. Their achievement is attracting attention as a discovery that should dramatically change this situation.


Via Diana Cobbe, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Four Ways to be Social and Relate to People ~ Understanding Human

Four Ways to be Social and Relate to People ~ Understanding Human | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In a broad cultural perspective, there are four elementary ways to be social and relate to people.

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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, September 2, 2013 3:29 PM
Equality matching is where people keep track of the imbalances among them, and therefore there is a reciprocity in the group which means that you expect getting the same amount from the group, as you gave to the group. Everyone will get identical shares, regardless of the individual needs. Individuals will feel compliance to return favours in order to keep things balanced, and each individual of the group has equal status. The moral of the group is based on fairness and justification, and the tit-for-tat method is a way of maintaining fairness in the group. A problem with this fairness is the procedures that people use for matching fairness. At the age of four, this type of relationship is often established. 
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Cognitive Decline in Diabetes Linked to Brain Atrophy - PsychCentral.com

Cognitive Decline in Diabetes Linked to Brain Atrophy - PsychCentral.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Cognitive Decline in Diabetes Linked to Brain Atrophy
PsychCentral.com
However, it was unclear whether this form of diabetes was an actual causal factor for the development of cognitive impairment.
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The Neurobiology of the Prefrontal Cortex: Anatomy, Evolution, and the Origin of Insight (Oxford Psychology)

The Neurobiology of the Prefrontal Cortex: Anatomy, Evolution, and the Origin of Insight (Oxford Psychology) [Richard E. Passingham, Steven P. Wise] on Amazon.com. *FREE* super saver shipping on qualifying offers.
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