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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Love Hormone 'Oxytocin' Makes Us More Accepting of Other People - Science World Report

Love Hormone 'Oxytocin' Makes Us More Accepting of Other People - Science World Report | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Science World Report
Love Hormone 'Oxytocin' Makes Us More Accepting of Other People
Science World Report
Oxytocin is a neurotransmitter in the brain and plays a major role in pair bonding. It also helps combat fear.
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New Types Of Artificial Lighting May Restore Sleep, In Outer Space And On Earth

New Types Of Artificial Lighting May Restore Sleep, In Outer Space And On Earth | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
NASA will spend millions of dollars soon to test new types of lighting to help promote sleep and fight insomnia.
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Jonathan Haidt Decodes the Tribal Psychology of Politics

Jonathan Haidt Decodes the Tribal Psychology of Politics | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

In March, Haidt will publish The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion (Pantheon). By laying out the science of morality—how it binds people into "groupish righteousness" and blinds them to their own biases—he hopes to drain some vitriol from public debate and enable conversations across ideological divides.


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Hugo Gonzalez's comment, May 5, 9:30 PM
The legalizing of gay marriage is a big issue that is still giving many issues to many of the states of the US. Some of the states have easily agreed to allow gay marriage while others are refusing to let that happen because it goes against everything they believe or have been taught. Mixing religion with politics is not a good thing because it leads to lawsuits that no one has the time or the money to spend on.
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Nobel Laureate Dies | The Scientist Magazine®

Nobel Laureate Dies | The Scientist Magazine® | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
David Hubel, who helped revolutionize the understanding of visual information processing, has passed away at age 87.
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Frontiers | Dreaming, waking conscious experience, and the resting brain: report of subjective experience as a tool in the cognitive neurosciences | Frontiers in Consciousness Research

Even when we are ostensibly doing “nothing” – as during states of rest, sleep, and reverie – the brain continues to process information. In resting wakefulness, the mind generates thoughts, plans for the future, and imagines fictitious scenarios.
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Amygdala evolution and cortical-subcortical integration

Amygdala evolution and cortical-subcortical integration | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
I finally had a chance to take a more careful look at this paper by Chareyron, L. J., Banta Lavenex, P., Amaral, D. G., & Lavenex, P. (2011). Stereological analysis of the rat and monkey amygda...
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They say the people who exhibit the most kindness have experienced a lot of pain.

They say the people who exhibit the most kindness have experienced a lot of pain. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
They say the people who exhibit the most kindness have experienced a lot of pain. | RAW FOR BEAUTY
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Mazes of the Mind - The Philosophy of Neuroscience » IAI TV

Mazes of the Mind - The Philosophy of Neuroscience » IAI TV | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Neuroscience promises answers to philosophical questions, but can it account for issues as complex as the origins of consciousness and the nature of art?
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Neuroscience: the Mystery & Philosophy of Music » IAI TV

Neuroscience: the Mystery & Philosophy of Music » IAI TV | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Can neuroscience uncover the purpose of art or the philosophy of music? Raymond Tallis explains why our love for music remains beyond science's grasp
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Brain Processes ‘Big’ Words Faster Than ‘Small’ Words

Brain Processes ‘Big’ Words Faster Than ‘Small’ Words | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Words which refer to 'big', abstract things are processed more quickly by the brain than 'smaller' words, a new study suggests.
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The Surprising Health Benefits Of Connecting With Everyone Around You

The Surprising Health Benefits Of Connecting With Everyone Around You | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By Nicole Frehsée An expert in the field of positive psychology explores the perks of bonding -- with everyone around you.

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How the Rule of Reciprocity May Affect Your Friendships

How the Rule of Reciprocity May Affect Your Friendships | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
I was reading an interesting article on the rule of reciprocity from our Psychology Guide, Kendra Cherry. The article got me thinking about how this rule might affect friendships. Basically, speaking, the rule of reciprocity states ...
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New Study: On Sad Music

New Study: On Sad Music | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"SADNESS is an emotion we usually try to avoid. So why do we choose to listen to sad music?

 

Musicologists and philosophers have wondered about this. Sad music can induce intense emotions, yet the type of sadness evoked by music also seems pleasing in its own way. Why? Aristotle famously suggested the idea of catharsis: that by overwhelming us with an undesirable emotion, music (or drama) somehow purges us of it.

 

But what if, despite their apparent similarity, sadness in the realm of artistic appreciation is not the same thing as sadness in everyday life?

In a study published this summer in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, my colleagues and I explored the idea that “musical emotion” encompasses both the felt emotion that the music induces in the listener and the perceived emotion that the listener judges the music to express. By isolating these two overlapping sets of emotions and observing how they related to each other, we hoped to gain a better understanding of sad music.

 

Forty-four people served as participants in our experiment. We asked them to listen to one of three musical excerpts of approximately 30 seconds each. The excerpts were from Mikhail Glinka’s “La Séparation” (F minor), Felix Blumenfeld’s “Sur Mer” (G minor) and Enrique Granados’s “Allegro de Concierto” (C sharp major, though the excerpt was in G major, which we transposed to G minor).

 

We were interested in the minor key because it is canonically associated with sad music, and we steered clear of well-known compositions to avoid interference from any personal memories related to the pieces.        

(Our participants were more or less split between men and women, as well as between musicians and nonmusicians, though these divisions turned out to be immaterial to our findings.)

 

A participant would listen to an excerpt and then answer a question about his felt emotions: “How did you feel when listening to this music?” Then he would listen to a “happy” version of the excerpt — i.e., transposed into the major key — and answer the same question. Next he would listen to the excerpt, again in both sad and happy versions, each time answering a question about other listeners that was designed to elicit perceived emotion: “How would normal people feel when listening to this music?”

 

(This is a slight simplification: in the actual study, the order in which the participant answered questions about felt and perceived emotion, and listened to sad and happy excerpts, varied from participant to participant.)

Our participants answered each question by rating 62 emotion-related descriptive words and phrases — from happy to sad, from bouncy to solemn, from heroic to wistful — on a scale from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much).

We found, as anticipated, that felt emotion did not correspond exactly to perceived emotion.

 

Although the sad music was both perceived and felt as “tragic” (gloomy, meditative and miserable), the listeners did not actually feel the tragic emotion as much as they perceived it. Likewise, when listening to sad music, the listeners felt more “romantic” emotion e.g., fascinated, dear and in love and “blithe” emotion e.g., merry, animated and feel like dancing than they perceived.

 

Something similar happened with the happy music: perceived blithe emotions were rated higher than their felt counterparts. In general, it appears that perceived emotions may be rated higher than felt emotions when it comes to emotional categories characteristically associated with a given key.

When listening to sad music, then, there is a tension, or slippage, between the two types of emotions. How are we to understand this gap?

 

One answer might be that in everyday life we typically experience emotions that have a direct connection to whatever object or situation gives rise to them. But when we listen to sad music (or watch a sad movie, or read a sad novel), we are inoculated from any real threat or danger that the music (or movie or novel) represents.

 

If this is true, what we experience when we listen to sad music might be thought of as “vicarious emotions.” Here, there is no object or situation that induces emotion directly, as in regular life. Instead, the vicarious emotions are free from the essential unpleasantness of their genuine counterparts, while still drawing force from the similarity between the two.

 

We need to study vicarious emotions further. In doing so, we may be able to improve our understanding of a neglected feature of our emotional system — namely, its sensitivity to something other than palpable needs or threats. When we weep at the beauty of sad music, we experience a profound aspect of our emotional selves that may contain insights about the meaning and significance of artistic experience — and also about ourselves as human beings.

 

Ai Kawakami is a postdoctoral fellow with the Okanoya Emotional Information Project of the Japan Science and Technology Agency."

 

 


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Oxytocin Could Make You More Tolerant - Science 2.0

Oxytocin Could Make You More Tolerant Science 2.0 Oxytocin, colloquially called the 'love hormone' because of its correlation to mother-infant attachment and romantic bonding in adults, could also make us more accepting of other people, according...
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Time to be honest

Time to be honest | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
“IS SIN original?” That is the question addressed by Shaul Shalvi, a psychologist at the University of Amsterdam, in a paper just published in Psychological...
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A new paradigm for nanoscale resolution MRI has been experimentally achieved

A new paradigm for nanoscale resolution MRI has been experimentally achieved | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A team from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University has devised a novel nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that delivers a roughly 10-nanometer spatial resolution.
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The Biology and Psychology of Ethical Behavior - BEING HUMAN 2013

Is morality culturally determined and relative, an evolved social contract that is absolute, or something else? In this session, we examine the biology of caring

 

 


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The auditory cortex may perform a role beyond just processing sound

The auditory cortex may perform a role beyond just processing sound | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Several studies have shown that expecting a reward or punishment can affect brain activity in areas responsible for processing different senses, including sight or touch. For example, research show
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The Big Stink About Anxiety: It Changes How Our Brains Process Odors - Forbes

The Big Stink About Anxiety: It Changes How Our Brains Process Odors - Forbes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The Big Stink About Anxiety: It Changes How Our Brains Process Odors Forbes The fMRI brain scan—which allowed the researchers to watch what was happening in the subjects' brains in real time—suggests that stress-induced anxiety from watching the...
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How Neuroscience Is Changing Medicine | IdeaFeed | Big Think

How Neuroscience Is Changing Medicine | IdeaFeed | Big Think | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Despite recent medical developments, our understanding of the brain is still quite incomplete.
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On Having a Mind, Having a Body and Being a Person » IAI TV

On Having a Mind, Having a Body and Being a Person » IAI TV | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What precisely is a person? How is the person related to the mind and body? Philosopher Peter Hacker pieces together the puzzle that is the human being
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Challenges and Opportunities of the BRAIN Initiative to be Addressed in Public Hearing

Challenges and Opportunities of the BRAIN Initiative to be Addressed in Public Hearing | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Join the public hearing A Mindful Approach to the BRAIN Initiative in person or online. The meeting will be held on the morning of October 4, 2013.
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A golden approach to ion channel inhibition

A golden approach to ion channel inhibition | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Drugs are often used in combination and, for pharmacologists, the manner of their interactions can cast light on drug mechanisms and biological processes. Here we provide simplified descriptions of commonly used analytical methods for analysing drug combinations and describe a new and practical experimental solution to address the mechanistic question: Do two channel-blocking drugs bind at the same site? We define two simple mathematical models that describe the effects of two channel blockers acting simultaneously at either the same (Syntopic Model) or different (Allotopic Model) binding sites within a channel pore. We find that the optimum concentrations of two drugs for distinguishing between the two models are related to the mathematical Golden Ratio. - by Jarvis GE & Thompson AJTrends in Pharmacological SciencesVolume 34, Issue 9, 481-488, 23 August 2013


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PLOS Medicine: Acupuncture and Counselling for Depression in Primary Care: A Randomised Controlled Trial

Depression is a significant cause of morbidity. Many patients have communicated an interest in non-pharmacological therapies to their general practitioners. Systematic reviews of acupuncture and counselling for depression in primary care have identified limited evidence. The aim of this study was to evaluate acupuncture versus usual care and counselling versus usual care for patients who continue to experience depression in primary care.

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Why We Like Sad Music

Why We Like Sad Music | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The emotions that we feel when listening to sad music differ from those that we perceive, a study shows.
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