Social Neuroscien...
Follow
Find
4.4K views | +0 today
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

The Brain And Behavior Research Foundation: Making A Difference In Mental ... - Forbes

The Brain And Behavior Research Foundation: Making A Difference In Mental ... - Forbes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Forbes
The Brain And Behavior Research Foundation: Making A Difference In Mental ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
Scoop.it!

Blazing Trails in Brain Science

Blazing Trails in Brain Science | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Dr. Thomas R. Insel’s twisted path to his role as director of the National Institute of Mental Health is a tour of where psychiatric science has been, where it’s going and why.

Via Donald J Bolger
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Consciousness
Scoop.it!

Musician Performs Duet with Her Own Brain | TIME.com

Musician Performs Duet with Her Own Brain | TIME.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The cello/brainwave duet explored the relationship a performer has to the music she's playing.

-

Cellist Katinka Kleijn performed both halves of a duet Sunday night. Her hands played the cello, and her brain, hooked up to a headset that detects cerebral electrical signals, played itself. Kleijn has been playing the cello for 35 years. Her brain was a little less experienced.


“Intelligence in the Human Machine,” the cello/brain duet, explored the relationship a performer has to the music she’s playing. During the performance, at Chicago’s Cultural Center, Kleijn wore an Emotiv EPOC, a neuroheadset with 14 sensors that attach to the scalp and detect brainwaves. In front of her, a laptop flashed a word and a few measures of music. She then played the music on her cello, interpreting the word onscreen. At the same time, her brainwaves, translated to audio, changed sounds as she reacted to the word.


Via Wildcat2030, ddrrnt
more...
Alistair Parker's curator insight, January 31, 2013 3:27 AM

add your insight...

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Consciousness
Scoop.it!

Embodied identity--a deeper understanding of body awareness.

A key point was the fact that bodily experiences always exists in the present moment. The experience of the body, the balance, and stability of the physical self were basic experiences that were connected to the conception of well-being and control. To understand one's emotions and needs through the awareness of the body were understood as the base for self-confidence, trust in one-self, and the ability to take care of oneself and one's needs physically and mentally. The subcategory "living in relation to others and in society" was conceived as an important aspect for the embodied self to interact with others and for societal participation. Working with the body in physiotherapy practice should include an understanding that body awareness is inseparable from the identity and may have an impact on the health of the individual.

 

full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.


Via ddrrnt
more...
Burgaliere Corinne's curator insight, December 3, 2013 6:42 AM

Body , mind and soul!...

Le corps et ses experiences  sont les racines de l'equilibre!

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Inside Education
Scoop.it!

The 100 most followed psychologists and neuroscientists on Twitter

The 100 most followed psychologists and neuroscientists on Twitter | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Via Timo Ilomäki
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Divorce rate cut in half for newlyweds who discussed five relationship movies

Divorce rate cut in half for newlyweds who discussed five relationship movies | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Discussing five movies about relationships over a month could cut the three-year divorce rate for newlyweds in half, researchers report. The study, involving 174 couples, is the first long-term investigation to compare different types of early marriage intervention programs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Behold: The Happiest Relationship Ever, According To Science

Behold: The Happiest Relationship Ever, According To Science | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Decades' worth of research has attempted to pinpoint what, exactly, makes a couple happy. Scientists have followed relationships over the course of years, administered surveys and studied pre-existing data to give the rest of us insightful nuggets of information.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Experts in Emotion 8.1 -- Richard Davidson on Affective Neuroscience - YouTube

Richard J. Davidson is the William James and Vilas Research Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, Director of the Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from With My Right Brain
Scoop.it!

Hamlet and neuroscience | Open Letters Monthly - an Arts and Literature Review

Hamlet and neuroscience | Open Letters Monthly - an Arts and Literature Review | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Neuroscience? In Elsinore? Lianne Habinek has Hamlet on the brain and goes at the question in book and volume. You may never think about Hamlet, or think about thinking, in the same way again.

Via Emre Erdogan
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Molecule Protects Brain from Effects of Diabetes, High Blood Sugar - Laboratory Equipment

Molecule Protects Brain from Effects of Diabetes, High Blood Sugar - Laboratory Equipment | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Molecule Protects Brain from Effects of Diabetes, High Blood Sugar Laboratory Equipment Following the successful animal testing of the molecule we developed, we hope to explore its potential benefit for treating cognitive and memory impairments...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Computerized cognitive training shows early promise in schizophrenia - News-Medical.net

Computerized cognitive training shows early promise in schizophrenia - News-Medical.net | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Computerized cognitive training shows early promise in schizophrenia News-Medical.net They conclude: “In sum, results indicate that a neuroscience-informed approach to cognitive training in young individuals with schizophrenia, using a portable...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Escape from the Chronic Pain Trap - Wall Street Journal

Escape from the Chronic Pain Trap - Wall Street Journal | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Escape from the Chronic Pain Trap
Wall Street Journal
There are research biases at work as well, including the absurd fact that most basic neuroscience work on pain pathways is done not only in rats but in male rats.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

New Research Says There Are Only Four Emotions

New Research Says There Are Only Four Emotions | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Conventional scientific understanding is that there are six, but new research suggests there may only happy, sad, afraid/surprised, and angry/disgusted.
Jocelyn Stoller's insight:

misleading.


There may be some "basic" states, but emotions do not stand alone. They have endless associations with other brain processes: somatic, sensory, cognitive, esthetic,  imaginative, etc.


Our range of emotional states is vast, filled with endless nuance and "shades" of individual meaning. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from With My Right Brain
Scoop.it!

Video series emphasizes 'body compassion'

Video series emphasizes 'body compassion' | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Jean Fain of Concord says the secret to overcoming food and body image issues isn’t depriving yourself at the dinner table or killing yourself at the gym. It’s about cultivating self-compassion wherever you are.In her new "Body Compassion" video series, the Harvard Medical School-affiliated psychotherapist prescribes loving-kindness with support from cognitive-behavioral therapy and other proven strategies for changing how you feel about your body—a shift that, paradoxically, makes it easier to change your body for good.author’s website, http://www.jeanfain.com, and her YouTube channel,http://www.youtube.com/user/jeanfain


Via Edwin Rutsch, Emre Erdogan
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Consciousness
Scoop.it!

A Brief Guide to Embodied Cognition: Why You Are Not Your Brain

A Brief Guide to Embodied Cognition: Why You Are Not Your Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Embodied cognition, the idea that the mind is not only connected to the body but that the body influences the mind, is one of the more counter-intuitive ideas in cognitive science. In sharp contrast is dualism, a theory of mind famously put forth by Rene Descartes in the 17th century when he claimed that “there is a great difference between mind and body, inasmuch as body is by nature always divisible, and the mind is entirely indivisible… the mind or soul of man is entirely different from the body.” In the proceeding centuries, the notion of the disembodied mind flourished. From it, western thought developed two basic ideas: reason is disembodied because the mind is disembodied and reason is transcendent and universal. However, as George Lakoff and Rafeal Núñez explain:

 

Cognitive science calls this entire philosophical worldview into serious question on empirical grounds… [the mind] arises from the nature of our brains, bodies, and bodily experiences. This is not just the innocuous and obvious claim that we need a body to reason; rather, it is the striking claim that the very structure of reason itself comes from the details of our embodiment… Thus, to understand reason we must understand the details of our visual system, our motor system, and the general mechanism of neural binding.

 

What exactly does this mean? It means that our cognition isn’t confined to our cortices. That is, our cognition is influenced, perhaps determined by, our experiences in the physical world. This is why we say that something is “over our heads” to express the idea that we do not understand; we are drawing upon the physical inability to not see something over our heads and the mental feeling of uncertainty. Or why we understand warmth with affection; as infants and children the subjective judgment of affection almost always corresponded with the sensation of warmth, thus giving way to metaphors such as “I’m warming up to her.”


Via ddrrnt
more...
Claudia M. Reder's comment, May 19, 2013 8:28 PM
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2011/11/04/a-brief-guide-to-embodied-cognition-why-you-are-not-your-brain/
Alexander Vorobiev-Char's curator insight, February 4, 2014 2:14 AM

Соответствуют ли Ваши мысли возможностям Вашего тела? Что из них первично?

Eli Levine's comment, February 4, 2014 9:35 AM
This sounds like an analogy to a government sitting within a society. For example, while a government does technically control the body society through the production of laws (to a limited extent), the body society also influences and effects the government (brain) to produce different results. This is how government can be working independently of (and sometimes, contrary to) the rest of society, just as the society can also work independently of (and, sometimes, when the government isn't being cooperative with society's needs) contrary to the government.<br><br>Thanks for this! :)
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from The Next Edge
Scoop.it!

Supercooperators: The mathematics of evolution, altruism and human behaviour

"Evolutionary biologist Martin Nowak and author Roger Highfield explain how cooperation and altruism fit into the larger evolutionary puzzle."

 

shared by Gideon Rosenblatt


Via ddrrnt
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections - Scientist

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections Scientist “The finding of a microglial role in synaptic pruning, and ultimately the emergence of efficient distributed networks, is very interesting,” said Ralph-Axel Müller from San Diego State...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

13 Things You Need To Know About Concussions

13 Things You Need To Know About Concussions | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Ahead of the Super Bowl, here’s the lowdown on brain damage in sports.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Neural networks underlying contributions from semantics in reading aloud | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Reading is an essential part of modern society, yet much is still unknown about the physiological underpinnings of its information processing components. Two influential cognitive models of reading, the connectionist and dual-route cascaded models, offer very different accounts, yet evidence for one or the other remains equivocal. These models differ in several ways, including the role of semantics (word meaning) in mapping spelling to sound. We used a new effective connectivity algorithm, IMaGES, to provide a network-level perspective on these network-level models. Left hemisphere regions of interest were defined based on main effects in functional magnetic resonance imaging and included two regions linked with semantic processing – angular gyrus (AG) and inferior temporal sulcus (ITS) – and two regions linked with phonological processing – posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG). Participants read aloud words of high or low spelling-sound consistency, word frequency, and imageability. Only the connectionist model predicted increased contributions from semantic areas with those computing phonology for low-consistency words. Effective connectivity analyses revealed that areas supporting semantic processing (e.g., the ITS) interacted with phonological areas (e.g., the pSTG), with the pattern changing as a function of word properties. Connectivity from semantic to phonological areas emerged for high- compared to low-imageability words, and a similar pattern emerged for low-consistency words, though only under certain conditions. Analyses of individual differences also showed that variation in the strength of modulation of ITS by AG was associated with reading aloud performance. Overall, these results suggest that connections with semantic processing areas are not only associated with reading aloud, but that these connections are also associated with optimal reading performance.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neuroscience - Memory - Learning - Mindfulness - Motivation
Scoop.it!

The Brain Book - Mapping the Mind

The Brain Book - Mapping the Mind | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Via David McGavock
more...
David McGavock's curator insight, February 1, 2014 4:53 PM

After reading Rita Carter's "Human Brain Book - Illustrated gude to its structure, function, and disorders" I'm excited to read this book. 

 

Provides various ways to look at the brain. Helpful if you want to learn - read on the topic of neuroscience.

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Educational and Tutorials
Scoop.it!

Looking at every synapse in the brain is breathtakingly beautiful

If you look at the wires behind your entertainment console, you're going to see different colors tangled up with different things leading to different places you forgot existed. It's an awful ugly mess. Seeing the brain is like that, only the opposite because in its chaos is beauty. Just look at the 3D brain scan above that shows every synapse, it's like a 3D Jackson Pollock painting.

Via David Hall
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Culinary Culprits: Foods That May Harm the Brain - Medscape

Culinary Culprits: Foods That May Harm the Brain Medscape "There are several lines of studies, including cell based, animal model, and human studies, to suggest that fructose intake from nonnatural sources impair neuronal connections, spatial...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Worry on the Brain - Bioscience Technology

Worry on the Brain - Bioscience Technology | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Bioscience Technology
Worry on the Brain
Bioscience Technology
Previous studies of anxiety in the brain have focused on the amygdala, an area known to play a role in fear.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Discovery of Conscience Centre Raises New Queries - The New Indian Express

Discovery of Conscience Centre Raises New Queries - The New Indian Express | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Discovery of Conscience Centre Raises New Queries
The New Indian Express
The latest finding, however, isn't some minor breakthrough of cognitive neuroscience. It is about good and bad, right and wrong.
more...
No comment yet.