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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Surprising new clue to the roots of hunger, neurons that drive appetite

Surprising new clue to the roots of hunger, neurons that drive appetite | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A scientific team has made a surprising discovery about the brain's hunger-inducing neurons, a finding with important implications for the treatment of obesity.

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While the function of eating is to nourish the body, this is not what actually compels us to seek out food. Instead, it is hunger, with its stomach-growling sensations and gnawing pangs that propels us to the refrigerator – or the deli or the vending machine. Although hunger is essential for survival, abnormal hunger can lead to obesity and eating disorders, widespread problems now reaching near-epidemic proportions around the world.


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Music Emotion and Evolution

Music Emotion and Evolution | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
With new evidence of animal sound communication and powerful social and brain effects, there is reason for research into music emotion and evolution
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from With My Right Brain
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The essential moral self. [Cognition. 2014] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Rethinking schizophrenia: Taming demons without drugs - New Scientist

Rethinking schizophrenia: Taming demons without drugs - New Scientist | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New Scientist
Rethinking schizophrenia: Taming demons without drugs
New Scientist
Antipsychotic drugs may do more harm than good. The tide is turning towards gentler methods, from talking therapies to brain training.
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Color-Coded 3D Brain Map Comes to Life in Video

Color-Coded 3D Brain Map Comes to Life in Video | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
An old saying has it that if our brains were simple enough for us to understand, we’d be too stupid to understand them.

Advances in medical
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20 Lessons From My Men's Group That Have Improved My Life - The Good Men Project

20 Lessons From My Men's Group That Have Improved My Life - The Good Men Project | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Sweaty Eye Syndrome is okay, "courage" is a chameleon, and even Badasses make mistakes.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from the plastic brain
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Brain Science Podcast: Dr. Merzenich Talks with Ginger Campbell About Brain Plasticity - "On the Brain"

Brain Science Podcast: Dr. Merzenich Talks with Ginger Campbell About Brain Plasticity - "On the Brain" | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
We are big fans of Ginger Campbell, MD’s Brain Science Podcast series – she features fascinating neuroscience luminaries in her in-depth, hour-long interviews, including Norman Doidge, Jeff Hawkins, Sharon Begley, Edward Taub, and many more. Learn more and listen now >>> Brain Science Podcast: Dr. Merzenich Talks with Ginger Campbell About Brain Plasticity Posit Science co-founder Dr. Michael Merzenich has … Continue reading →

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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Compassion
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Practitioners need to build empathy | Orthotics Prosthetics

Practitioners need to build empathy | Orthotics Prosthetics | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Patients may leave a practice for any number of reasons, but learning to communicate with empathy can help build trust,making it less likely they will leave. Patients do not like to feel judged, so instead, judge the condition or behavior, O’Connell said.



The practitioner should not call the patient “fat” or “lazy” but should ask him if he understands the connection between exercise or smoking, for example, to poor health. If patient think their practitioners are judgmental, they will not want to continue going to them, O’Connell said, so it is important to normalize patients’ ambivalence to change in behavior or reluctance to continue as a patient. Normalizing simply tells patients that it is ok to feel uncertain, he said.



Patients may leave a practice for any
number of reasons, but learning to
communicate with empathy
can help build trust...



Appropriate self-disclosure helps to build empathy, O’Connell said, but this does not include telling a patient ‘I understand how you feel,’ because in all likelihood, the practitioner does not.


Appropriate self-disclosure helps to

build empathy... 




image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physician



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Unravelling the brain’s memory networks - Research Highlights - RIKEN RESEARCH

Unravelling the brain’s memory networks - Research Highlights - RIKEN RESEARCH | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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Brain Science Podcast: BSP 105 Brain Plasticity with Michael Merzenich


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David McGavock's curator insight, February 5, 2014 7:32 PM

"there came a period in the middle of the century where the predominant belief was that the brain could only change—was only capable of changing physically and functionally—when you were a small child (a baby or very early in childhood), and then it froze in its connections, it froze in its operations, and you were pretty much defined with respect to your capabilities, what you would amount to in life, by the time you entered the schoolhouse door."

 

"In fact, it's constructed to continuously change itself. And those changes account for our abilities. And because we can acquire or improve our abilities at any point in life, we know that our brain is continuously plastic, subject to change; and if we control that change, for change for the better."

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15 Things That Emotionally Strong People Don't Do | Elite Daily

15 Things That Emotionally Strong People Don't Do | Elite Daily | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Emotionally strong individuals do what they do because they love doing it.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, February 4, 2014 4:04 PM

See #6: fundamental misunderstanding of ADR.  Weaponization of ADR leads to this perception.

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Change in brain anatomy shown in women with multiple sclerosis, depression

Change in brain anatomy shown in women with multiple sclerosis, depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A multicenter research team led by Cedars-Sinai neurologist Nancy Sicotte, MD, an expert in multiple sclerosis and state-of-the-art imaging techniques, used a new, automated technique to...
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The Brain And Behavior Research Foundation: Making A Difference In Mental ... - Forbes

The Brain And Behavior Research Foundation: Making A Difference In Mental ... - Forbes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Forbes
The Brain And Behavior Research Foundation: Making A Difference In Mental ...
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Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid

Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Editors' Note: Following the huge popularity of this post, article source Amy Morin has authored a Dec. 3 guest post on exercises to increase mental strength here.

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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from With My Right Brain
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Addiction: A Nonlinear Path to Recovery

Addiction: A Nonlinear Path to Recovery | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
"Every addiction starts with a healthy intention," writes Alyssa Siegel. But the path to recovery is never the same.

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How to Use an Empathy Map for UX: A Tool for Organizing Users' Thoughts and Emotions

How to Use an Empathy Map for UX: A Tool for Organizing Users' Thoughts and Emotions | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Learn how to capture users' feedback to build a better experience using this free UX tool from Tadpull.


Our take on the Empathy Map came about as a way to distill and organize qualitative data. We start every project by interviewing and observing current and potential customers to better understand their pain points and aspirations.


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Our take on the Empathy Map came

about as a way to distill and organize

qualitative data.

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Then, as we sift through pages of raw notes, sketches, audio/video files and photos, we use the empathy map to glean the juicy parts and make it visual to help drive the User Persona and eventually the Creative Brief.


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Think Twice: How the Gut's "Second Brain" Influences Mood and Well-Being

Think Twice: How the Gut's "Second Brain" Influences Mood and Well-Being | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The emerging and surprising view of how the enteric nervous system in our bellies goes far beyond just processing the food we eat
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Don’t stop knitting! It keeps you healthy.

Don’t stop knitting! It keeps you healthy. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Who knew that knitting could have such a positive impact on our physical and mental health?
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Study: For Couples, Mutual Ambivalence Increases Cardiovascular Risk - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society

Study: For Couples, Mutual Ambivalence Increases Cardiovascular Risk - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research finds plaque build-up in the coronary arteries of older couples who expressed mixed feelings about one another.
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Adults Can Have ADHD, Too

Adults Can Have ADHD, Too | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Newly recognized, adult ADHD threatens the success and well-being of 4 percent of adults. A combination of treatments can help the afflicted lead a more productive life
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Vitamin-mineral treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults: double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial

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Psychoanalysts claim long-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy more effective than shorter therapies.

Psychoanalysts claim long-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy more effective than shorter therapies. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Is longer psychotherapy better? Discusses claims in JAMA that psychoanalytic psychotherapy is more effective than shorter therapies. Well-documented.
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Effect of lowering blood pressure on risk for cognitive decline in patients with diabetes

Effect of lowering blood pressure on risk for cognitive decline in patients with diabetes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Intensive blood pressure and cholesterol lowering was not associated with reduced risk for diabetes-related cognitive decline in older patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes mellitus, according to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine by Jeff D.
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Study finds high Rx burden for bipolar patients

Study finds high Rx burden for bipolar patients | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A study of 230 patients with bipolar I disorder whose symptoms were severe enough to warrant admission to a Rhode Island psychiatric hospital in 2010 reveals that more than a third were there despite taking four or more psychiatric medications.
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