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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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A single switch dictates severity of epileptic seizures, researchers find

A single switch dictates severity of epileptic seizures, researchers find | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A switch in the brain of people with epilepsy dictates whether their seizures will be relatively mild or lead to a dangerous and debilitating loss of consciousness, Yale researchers have found.
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MRI pinpoints region of brain injury in some concussion patients

MRI pinpoints region of brain injury in some concussion patients | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers using information provided by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique have identified regional white matter damage in the brains of people who experience chronic dizziness and other symptoms after concussion.
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Trait mindfulness and catastrophizing as mediators of the association between pain severity and pain-related impairment

Publication date: August 2014
Source:Personality and Individual Differences, Volume 66
Author(s): Chung Jung Mun , Morris A.

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Protein researches closing in on the mystery of schizophrenia

Protein researches closing in on the mystery of schizophrenia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—Schizophrenia is a severe disease for which there is still no effective medical treatment. In an attempt to understand exactly what happens in the brain of a schizophrenic person, researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have analyzed proteins in the brains of rats that ...
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EMPATHY: How we live with each other

The first of a series of roundtables around the topic of Empathy. 


Recorded July, 2013 at the Massachusetts Historical Society's Dowse Library. Featuring:
Dr. Marco Iacoboni
Dr. Mary Hellen Immordino-Yang
Dr. Robert Weller
Dr. Adam Seligman
Leslie Jamison
Ben Doepke & the SEEK company (host)


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Neuroscape Lab - bridging the gap between neuroscience and technology

Neuroscape Lab - bridging the gap between neuroscience and technology | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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Could Online Gaming Help Scientists Find a Cure for Neurological Diseases?

Could Online Gaming Help Scientists Find a Cure for Neurological Diseases? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at UC San Francisco are hoping to better understand the brain with the help of online games.
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Mill Valley Resident, UCSF Doctor, Develops 'Groundbreaking' Online Project

Mill Valley Resident, UCSF Doctor, Develops 'Groundbreaking' Online Project | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Brain Health Registry brings promise of faster, better clinical trials, new treatments.
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Sex on the Brain – Phenomena: Only Human

Sex on the Brain – Phenomena: Only Human | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In this month's issue of Popular Science, I wrote a (very) short column about "hardwired" sex differences in the human brain. My premise: There aren't any meaningful differences, and the studies th...
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Researchers report creating diagram of a mouse’s brain

Researchers report creating diagram of a mouse’s brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Map of rodent’s neurons may help explain how humans think, feel and behave.


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A formal model of interpersonal inference. [Front Hum Neurosci. 2014]

A formal model of interpersonal inference. [Front Hum Neurosci. 2014] | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Introduction: We propose that active Bayesian inference-a general framework for decision-making-can equally be applied to interpersonal exchanges. Social cognition, however, entails special challenges. We address these challenges through a novel formulation of a formal model and demonstrate its psychological significance. Method: We review relevant literature, especially with regards to interpersonal representations, formulate a mathematical model and present a simulation study. The model accommodates normative models from utility theory and places them within the broader setting of Bayesian inference. Crucially, we endow people's prior beliefs, into which utilities are absorbed, with preferences of self and others. The simulation illustrates the model's dynamics and furnishes elementary predictions of the theory. Results: (1) Because beliefs about self and others inform both the desirability and plausibility of outcomes, in this framework interpersonal representations become beliefs that have to be actively inferred. This inference, akin to "mentalizing" in the psychological literature, is based upon the outcomes of interpersonal exchanges. (2) We show how some well-known social-psychological phenomena (e.g., self-serving biases) can be explained in terms of active interpersonal inference. (3) Mentalizing naturally entails Bayesian updating of how people value social outcomes. Crucially this includes inference about one's own qualities and preferences. Conclusion: We inaugurate a Bayes optimal framework for modeling intersubject variability in mentalizing during interpersonal exchanges. Here, interpersonal representations are endowed with explicit functional and affective properties. We suggest the active inference framework lends itself to the study of psychiatric conditions where mentalizing is distorted.
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The Science of Happiness

The Science of Happiness | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Starts September 9, 2014 - Register Now!

An unprecedented free online course exploring the roots of a happy, meaningful life. Co-taught by the GGSC’s Dacher Keltner andEmiliana Simon-Thomas. Up to 16 CE credit hours available.

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Gene variant puts women at higher risk of Alzheimer's than it does men, study finds

Gene variant puts women at higher risk of Alzheimer's than it does men, study finds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Carrying a copy of a gene variant called ApoE4 confers a substantially greater risk for Alzheimer's disease on women than it does on men, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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Sperm can pass trauma symptoms through generations, study finds

Sperm can pass trauma symptoms through generations, study finds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have put ample effort into identifying genes that help explain why cancer or heart disease run in some families. But scientists still don't know if some genes can explain why the...

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Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, April 15, 2014 3:19 AM

This may explain why some people can be prone to mental illness, even when they don't share important environmental risk-factors.

 

It's an interesting study. It certainly complicates the nature/nurture debate. The findings here imply that environmental conditions and experiences can influence our biology, and in turn, the genetics we pass on. It is then no longer possible to argue that some factors are strictly genetic, and some are strictly environmental. It only makes sense that this dichotomic reasoning is too simplistic to explain human behavior.

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Bet you can't watch this without smiling

Smile! March 20, 2014 is the United Nation's International Day of Happiness.

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The hidden power of smiling

The hidden power of smiling | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Ron Gutman reviews a raft of studies about smiling, and reveals some surprising results. Did you know your smile can be a predictor of how long you'll live -- and that a simple smile has a measurable effect on your overall well-being? Prepare to flex a few facial muscles as you learn more about this evolutionarily contagious behavior.

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Biomedical Technology Research Center | Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases

Biomedical Technology Research Center | Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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Scientists Map Process by Which Brain Cells Form Long-Term Memories | ucsf.edu

Scientists Map Process by Which Brain Cells Form Long-Term Memories | ucsf.edu | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

June 09, 2013

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have deciphered how a protein called Arc regulates the activity of neurons – providing much-needed clues into the brain’s ability to form long-lasting memories.

These findings, reported Sunday in Nature Neuroscience, also offer newfound understanding as to what goes on at the molecular level when this process becomes disrupted.

Led by Gladstone senior investigator Steve Finkbeiner, MD, PhD, this research delved deep into the inner workings of synapses. Synapses are the highly specialized junctions that process and transmit information between neurons. Most of the synapses our brain will ever have are formed during early brain development, but throughout our lifetimes these synapses can be made, broken and strengthened. Synapses that are more active become stronger, a process that is essential for forming new memories.

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How Light Wakes Up the Brain – Phenomena: Only Human

How Light Wakes Up the Brain – Phenomena: Only Human | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
I first learned how our eyes work in a college neuroscience class in the fall of 2002. My textbook showed colorful cartoons of the retina, lined with two types of cells that convert light waves int...
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Why We All Need to Belong to Someone

Why We All Need to Belong to Someone | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It may not be a popular phrase, but the feeling is crucial.

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Flying Through Inner Space – Phenomena: The Loom

Flying Through Inner Space – Phenomena: The Loom | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It's hard to truly see the brain. I don't mean to simply see a three-pound hunk of tissue. I mean to see it in a way that offers a deep feel for how it works. That's not surprising, given that the ...
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How Your Season of Birth Is Etched in Your Brain | Science Blogs | WIRED

How Your Season of Birth Is Etched in Your Brain  | Science Blogs | WIRED | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The season we're born in can have far-reaching consequences. Now, scientists are studying the links between season of birth and brain structure in healthy adults, and think genetic factors controlling brain growth play a role in these differences.
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