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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Summer Institute in Cognitive Neuroscience — Portal

Summer Institute in Cognitive Neuroscience — Portal | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The Summer Institute in Cognitive Neuroscience (SI) advances the cognitive neurosciences by training the next generation of researchers in emerging information, methods and theoretical perspectives in mind-brain science, including how this...
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High-resolution scans pinpoint the exact part of the brain where Alzheimer's begins - and trace its spread

High-resolution scans pinpoint the exact part of the brain where Alzheimer's begins - and trace its spread | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at Columbia University in New York found that the first sign of the disease is reduced metabolic activity in the lateral entorhinal cortex.
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Does Social Learning Need to be Social? Insights from Bumble Bees

This might seem perplexing to some, but I’ve just spent two days listening to talks and meeting with people who all work on social insects. And it was great. I was at Royal Holloway, University of London, where the IUSSI meeting was taking place.
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Touch Me… Please!

Touch Me… Please! | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
We're built to thrive on love... but I wonder how many people go through adult life without real intimate touch? Why do we shy away from touching others and being touched?
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Emotional Intelligence Predicts Job Success: Do You Have It?

Emotional Intelligence Predicts Job Success: Do You Have It? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The best salespeople and leaders have a high EQ. Daniel Goleman the man who coined the term pulls apart the aspects of emotional intelligence.

Via Sandeep Gautam
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John Michel's curator insight, December 21, 2013 12:14 PM

A great article about the "other kind of smarts." 

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New Study Reveals Insight into How the Brain Processes Shape and Color

New Study Reveals Insight into How the Brain Processes Shape and Color | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers discover color and shape are represented independently. A new study reports on how the brain's inferior temporal cortex processes visual information.
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Social neuroscience

Social neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Social psychologist Mahzarin Banaji on how consciousness works, functional MRI and how different people perceive the same things (Will cog/social neuroscience end up taking over psychology?
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Research shows that the best way to maximize creativity is to maintain high levels of both serotonin and dopamine, which will keep a person calm but energized. But how? The path begins with proper...

Research shows that the best way to maximize creativity is to maintain high levels of both serotonin and dopamine, which will keep a person calm but energized. But how? The path begins with proper... | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Research on neuroscience and creativity suggests that Debbie Millman was right after all.
Also see how sleep shapes our every waking moment and even helps regulate our negative moods, then consider...
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NIH Calls for BRAIN Proposals | The Scientist Magazine®

NIH Calls for BRAIN Proposals | The Scientist Magazine® | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The National Institutes of Health has outlined the types of projects it intends to fund through the federal BRAIN Initiative, and is requesting applications.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, December 19, 2013 2:23 PM

Promising research initiative, but let’s not wait for researchers  to tell us what we already know—there are lots of kids who can’t read and will be well served by the information, curriculum, and approaches we currently have!-Lou

Excerpt:

"Beginning in February, researchers can apply for National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding through President Obama’s BRAIN Initiative, which aims to generate a comprehensive picture of the human brain’s structure and function. This week (December 18), the agency announced  requests for applications (RFAs), soliciting projects on technology methods development, among five other “high-priority” research areas outlined by a planning committee earlier this year.

“We have an unprecedented opportunity to develop new technologies that will allow us to map the circuits of the brain, measure activity within those circuits, and understand how their interactions maintain health and modulate human behavior,” said NIH Director Francis Collins in a statement..."

 
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Emotions in Parkinson's disease

Emotions in Parkinson's disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Is it the disease itself or the treatment that impairs the perception of emotions?
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Laugh yourself to sleep: memory consolidation for humorous information [Exp Brain Res. 2013] - NCBI

There is extensive evidence that emotional information is better remembered than neutral information across long delays, especially if the delay interval contains an opportunity for sleep. However, as prior studies have focused on memory for negative stimuli, it is unclear whether positive memories benefit from time and sleep as well. To investigate the consolidation of positive memories, the current study examined differences in memory for humorous and non-humorous cartoons. While prior evidence demonstrates that humorous information is preferentially remembered relative to non-humorous information over brief delays, it is unknown whether this benefit lasts across longer delay intervals or whether sleep is important for lasting humor memories to form. Thus, we tested memory for 27 cartoons across 12-h delay periods containing either sleep or wakefulness. Results indicate that humor's enhancing effect on recall memory is robust across a 12-h delay and that a period of sleep facilitates this effect over wakefulness when cartoons are novel to participants and ranked based on subjective emotional ratings. Further, in accordance with previous studies that reveal diminished emotional reactivity to stimuli following sleep, in a supplemental experiment, we found that sleep reduced subjective ratings of humor, arousal, and positivity of humorous cartoons. These findings provide preliminary evidence that sleep's impact on negative emotional memory consolidation and emotional reactivity can be extended to positive stimuli as well.
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Inhaled Stem Cells Might Replace Lost Neurons: Scientific American

Inhaled Stem Cells Might Replace Lost Neurons: Scientific American | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Intranasal stem cell therapy may one day treat brain disorders
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Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Driving Skills In Parkinson’s Disease Patients

Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Driving Skills In Parkinson’s Disease Patients | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
German clinical trial finds that deep brain stimulation enhances the driving skills of Parkinson’s disease patients.
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Brains On Purpose™: Reading each other's minds: Some videos on Theory of Mind (ToM)

Brains On Purpose™: Reading each other's minds: Some videos on Theory of Mind (ToM) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Click on over to the University of California Television site to watch some videos from a conference titled "Mind Reading: Human Origins and Theory of Mind." Click to read the Wikipedia page on Theory of Mind.
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Manipulative and empathetic people both adept at reading emotions -

Manipulative and empathetic people both adept at reading emotions - | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

People shouldn’t assume that someone who can easily read their feelings always has their best interests at heart.

 

Although good emotion-recognition skills might seem like concern and empathy, some people might use these skills to manipulate others, new University of Michigan research suggests.

 

Both manipulative and empathetic people are equally capable of reading others’ emotions, according to U-M researchers, who conducted two studies examining the relationship between narcissism, empathy and emotion recognition.


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Giving grief a voice

Giving grief a voice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When my best friend's five-year-old son died suddenly, it left a hole so enormous I couldn’t believe it wasn’t leading the 6 o’clock news.

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10 Remarkable Ways Meditation Helps Your Mind

10 Remarkable Ways Meditation Helps Your Mind | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Studies find meditation provides lasting emotional control, cultivates compassion, reduces pain sensitivity, boosts multitasking and more...

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Mapping Objects in the Brain

Mapping Objects in the Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researcher report a brain region which responds to a particular category of objects consists of a small cluster of neurons which encodes the visual features of these objects.
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The Logistics of Learning

The Logistics of Learning | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Two new studies provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie the learning process.
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Love to Win or Hate to Lose? Asymmetry of Dopamine D2 Receptor Binding Predicts Sensitivity to Reward versus Punishment.

Humans show consistent differences in the extent to which their behavior reflects a bias toward appetitive approach-related behavior or avoidance of aversive stimuli [Elliot, A. J. Approach and avoidance motivation. In A. J. Elliot (Ed.), Handbook of approach and avoidance motivation (pp. 3-14). New York: Psychology Press, 2008]. We examined the hypothesis that in healthy participants this motivational bias (assessed by self-report and by a probabilistic learning task that allows direct comparison of the relative sensitivity to reward and punishment) reflects lateralization of dopamine signaling. Using [F-18]fallypride to measure D2/D3 binding, we found that self-reported motivational bias was predicted by the asymmetry of frontal D2 binding. Similarly, striatal and frontal asymmetries in D2 dopamine receptor binding, rather than absolute binding levels, predicted individual differences in learning from reward versus punishment. These results suggest that normal variation in asymmetry of dopamine signaling may, in part, underlie human personality and cognition.
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The Evolution of Eupathics: The Historical Roots of Subjective Measures of Wellbeing | Angner | International Journal of Wellbeing

The Evolution of Eupathics: The Historical Roots of Subjective Measures of Wellbeing | Angner | International Journal of Wellbeing | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The Evolution of Eupathics: The Historical Roots of Subjective Measures of Wellbeing
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Blackbaud research probes psychology of online giving - UK Fundraising

Blackbaud research probes psychology of online giving - UK Fundraising | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The top five reasons that people give online are revealed in research into the psychology of online giving by Blackbaud Europe.
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Mirror Neurons: Cells that Read Minds

Mirror Neurons: Cells that Read Minds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Humans, it turns out, have mirror neurons that are far smarter, more flexible and more highly evolved than any of those found in monkeys, a fact that scientists say reflects the evolution of humans' sophisticated social abilities.

 

The human brain has multiple mirror neuron systems that specialize in carrying out and understanding not just the actions of others but their intentions, the social meaning of their behavior and their emotions.

 

"We are exquisitely social creatures," Dr. Rizzolatti said. "Our survival depends on understanding the actions, intentions and emotions of others."

 

By Sandra Blakeslee

 

image: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirror_neuron


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Compassion's curative power

Compassion's curative power | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Emma Seppala, PhD is the associate director of Stanford School of Medicine’s The Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE) and a well-known researcher and speaker on the science of well-being, social connection and compassion. BeWell spoke with Dr. Seppala to glean her latest insights and learned that strong medicine does not always come in a prescription drug vial.


Empathy: the most evolved form of kindness

Most of us (except in extreme cases, such as psychopaths) are wired for empathy, defined as the shared experience of someone else’s pain or pleasure. Whenever we look at or interact with others, parts of our brain, “mirror neurons,” internally echo what others do and feel. Someone’s smile, for example, activates the smile muscles in our faces, while a frown activates our frown muscles. In this way, we “read” other people’s states of mind. Think about when you see a relative walk into the room with a troubled expression; before you’ve even exchanged words, you know if something is going terribly wrong or wonderfully right. Our brain is wired to read cues so subtle that although our brain may not consciously register them ("he doesn't seem angry”), our body will. Research by Stanford University’s James Gross shows that even when someone is hiding their anger and we don’t consciously know they are upset, our blood pressure will increase. Our wiring for empathy is so deep that, just by observing someone else in pain, the "pain matrix" in our brain is activated. If someone else hurts, we hurt ... 


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Researchers Provide New Insights into Cause of Human Neurodegenerative Disease

Researchers Provide New Insights into Cause of Human Neurodegenerative Disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers identify Neurexin2 as a new target for potential treatment of spinal muscular atrophy.
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