Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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How sleep acts as a cleaning system for the brain

How sleep acts as a cleaning system for the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Here’s one more reason why getting a good night’s sleep is critical to your health.
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Want To Train Your Brain To Feel More Compassion? Here's How - Co.Exist

Want To Train Your Brain To Feel More Compassion? Here's How - Co.Exist | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientific evidence shows that we can teach our brains to feel more compassion, both for others and ourselves. Imagine how the world might be...
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The Alzheimer’s Breakthrough That’s Been Missing Until Now—The Third Dimension — NOVA Next | PBS

The Alzheimer’s Breakthrough That’s Been Missing Until Now—The Third Dimension — NOVA Next | PBS | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Neuroscientists announced they have a new model that could hasten research into treatments for the debilitating disease.


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Scientists sniff out unexpected role for stem cells in the brain

Scientists sniff out unexpected role for stem cells in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
For decades, scientists thought that neurons in the brain were born only during the early development period and could not be replenished.
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Why Depression and Sadness Are not the Same - PsychCentral.com (blog)

Why Depression and Sadness Are not the Same - PsychCentral.com (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Depression and sadness are often viewed as the same thing. Part of the confusion is that the most recognizable symptom of depression is sadness, according to Stephanie Smith, PsyD, a psychologist in practice in Erie, Colo.
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What happens to your brain when your mind is at rest?

What happens to your brain when your mind is at rest? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
For many years, the focus of brain mapping was to examine changes in the brain that occur when people are attentively engaged in an activity. No one spent much time thinking about what happens to the brain when people are doing very little.
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How neuroscience explains the urge to self-harm – Carrie Arnold – Aeon

How neuroscience explains the urge to self-harm – Carrie Arnold – Aeon | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Cutting brings relief because emotion and pain criss-cross in the brain. Can we untangle the circuits and stop self-harm?
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Novel culture system replicates course of Alzheimer's disease, confirms amyloid hypothesis

Novel culture system replicates course of Alzheimer's disease, confirms amyloid hypothesis | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
An innovative laboratory culture system has succeeded, for the first time, in reproducing the full course of events underlying the development of Alzheimer's disease.
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Study reveals novel role for the Pin1 molecule

Study reveals novel role for the Pin1 molecule | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Synapses are "dynamic" things: they can regulate their action in neural processes related to learning, for example, but also as a consequence of diseases.
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New study highlights health benefits of social engagement among older people

New study highlights health benefits of social engagement among older people | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A study investigating the impacts of loneliness on older people in Ireland conducted by Professor Brian Lawlor, Connolly Norman Professor of Old Age Psychiatry and Clinical Director, NEIL Programmme at Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, has...
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Why losing weight is hard – but not impossible

Why losing weight is hard – but not impossible | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Seeing pictures of preened celebrities, or even slimmer friends, makes many wish that their arms were that little bit thinner or abs more tightly toned.
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What 60 Years of Research Has Thought Us About Willpower

What 60 Years of Research Has Thought Us About Willpower | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What are the secrets to willpower? Find out in "The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control" by pioneer psychologist Walter Mischel.

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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, October 10, 2014 1:24 PM

What you might not know about the Marshmallow Test is that its creator, legendary psychologist Walter Mischel, struggled with self-control his whole life...

Prof. Hankell's curator insight, October 10, 2014 1:27 PM

What you might not know about the Marshmallow Test is that its creator, legendary psychologist Walter Mischel, struggled with self-control his whole life...

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Increased health risks linked to first-episode psychosis

Increased health risks linked to first-episode psychosis | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Many patients with psychosis develop health risks associated with premature death early in the course of their mental illness, researchers have found.
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How gut bacteria ensures a healthy brain – and could play a role in treating depression

How gut bacteria ensures a healthy brain – and could play a role in treating depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
One of medicine's greatest innovations in the 20th century was the development of antibiotics. It transformed our ability to combat disease.
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Researchers Demonstrate Direct Fluid Flow Influences Neuron Growth - Scicasts

Researchers Demonstrate Direct Fluid Flow Influences Neuron Growth - Scicasts | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Arlington, TX (Scicasts) — A University of Texas at Arlington team exploring how neuron growth can be controlled in the lab and, possibly, in the human body has published a new paper in Nature Scientific Reports on how fluid flow could play a...
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Brain's Compass Relies on Geometric Relationships

Brain's Compass Relies on Geometric Relationships | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People use geometrical relationships to help orient themselves, a new study reports.

 

The brain has a complex system for keeping track of which direction you are facing as you move about; remembering how to get from one place to another would otherwise be impossible. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown how the brain anchors this mental compass.

 

Their findings provide a neurological basis for something that psychologists have long observed about navigational behavior: people use geometrical relationships to orient themselves.

The research, which is related to the work that won this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, adds new dimensions to our understanding of spatial memory and how it helps us to build memories of events.

The study was led by Russell Epstein, a professor of psychology in Penn’s School of Arts & Sciences, and Steven Marchette, a postdoctoral fellow in Epstein’s lab. Also contributing to the study were lab members Lindsay Vass, a graduate student, and Jack Ryan, a research specialist.

It was published in Nature Neuroscience.


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Exercise can improve memory in 60-year-olds

Exercise can improve memory in 60-year-olds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study, in which researchers from Karolinska Institutet participated, shows that physical activity can improve memory performance in older people through increasing volume and blood flow in an area of the brain called hippocampus. It is the first time these connections are being studied in people ...

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Newly discovered brain cells explain a prosocial effect of oxytocin

Newly discovered brain cells explain a prosocial effect of oxytocin | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Oxytocin, the body's natural love potion, helps couples fall in love, makes mothers bond with their babies, and encourages teams to work together. Now new research at Rockefeller University reveals a mechanism by which this prosocial hormone has its effect on interactions between the sexes, at least in certain situations. The key, it turns out, is a newly discovered class of brain cells.
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Telemedicine could revolutionize access to mental health treatment

Telemedicine could revolutionize access to mental health treatment | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
For millions of Americans, mental health treatment is largely out of reach—a fact one FIU psychologist is trying to change.
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Study: Two systems for empathy: a double dissociation between emotional and cognitive empathy in inferior frontal gyrus versus ventromedial prefrontal lesions.

Study: Two systems for empathy: a double dissociation between emotional and cognitive empathy in inferior frontal gyrus versus ventromedial prefrontal lesions. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Recent evidence suggests that there are two possible systems for empathy: a basic emotional contagion system and a more advanced cognitive perspective-taking system.


However, it is not clear whether these two systems are part of a single interacting empathy system or whether they are independent. Additionally, the neuroanatomical bases of these systems are largely unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that emotional empathic abilities (involving the mirror neuron system) are distinct from those related to cognitive empathy and that the two depend on separate anatomical substrates.


Subjects with lesions in the ventromedial prefrontal (VM) or inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) cortices and two control groups were assessed with measures of empathy that incorporate both cognitive and affective dimensions. The findings reveal a remarkable behavioural and anatomic double dissociation between deficits in cognitive empathy (VM) and emotional empathy (IFG).


Furthermore, precise anatomical mapping of lesions revealed Brodmann area 44 to be critical for emotional empathy while areas 11 and 10 were found necessary for cognitive empathy. These findings are consistent with these cortices being different in terms of synaptic hierarchy and phylogenetic age.  


The pattern of empathy deficits among patients with VM and IFG lesions represents a first direct evidence of a double dissociation between emotional and cognitive empathy using the lesion method.



http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/brain/132/3/617.full.pdf

Shamay-Tsoory SG1, Aharon-Peretz JPerry D.





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think2share's curator insight, October 13, 2014 5:25 AM

On the finer workings of the Brain...

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Discovered: How The Brain Repairs Itself After a Stroke — PsyBlog

Discovered: How The Brain Repairs Itself After a Stroke — PsyBlog | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
These cells are the key to recovery from a stroke.

A mechanism by which the brain creates new nerve cells to help it recover from a stroke has been discovered.The research could eventually lead to new therapies for stroke sufferers, as well as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease. Strokes are caused by blood vessels in the brain getting blocked by a clot — this causes nerve cells to die. The death of vital brain cells can lead to devastating effects on people’s thinking, motor and sensory abilities. The new study, though, shows exactly how the brain recovers from these insults and might point the way to new treatments.


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MagLab MRI machine provides in-depth analysis of strokes

MagLab MRI machine provides in-depth analysis of strokes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research conducted at the Florida State University-based National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has revealed a new, innovative way to classify the severity of a stroke, aid in diagnosis and evaluate potential treatments.
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The brain's forgotten glial cells

The brain's forgotten glial cells | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
For a long time, researchers have neglected the 100 million glial cells found in our brains, but that is no longer the case. Now they have discovered that the glial cells cleanse the brain of waste.
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Brain-computer interface enables "locked-in" brain stroke sufferer to communicate

Brain-computer interface enables "locked-in" brain stroke sufferer to communicate | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By enabling users to communicate and control devices with their thoughts, brain-computer interfaces (BCI) hold almost a scary amount of potential.
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What It’s Like to Live with Schizophrenia

What It’s Like to Live with Schizophrenia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Thirty-one years ago Elyn R. Saks was diagnosed with schizophrenia. Her prognosis was grave: she wouldn’t be able to live independently, hold a job or find love.
After her hospitalization at 28 years old, a doctor suggested she work as a cashier....
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