Social Neuroscien...
Follow
Find
3.0K views | +2 today
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neurovium: Neuroscience at the intersection of Philosophy, Logic, Biology & Physics
Scoop.it!

The Brain Mapping Initiatives: Foundational Issues, Bioethics. What are the ethical implications?

The Brain Mapping Initiatives: Foundational Issues, Bioethics. What are the ethical implications? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Via Nima Dehghani
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Psychology, Sociology & Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Social Connection Makes a Better Brain

Social Connection Makes a Better Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Recent trends show that people increasingly value material goods over relationships—but neuroscience and evolution say this goes against our nature.

Via VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Connectivity is Key to Understanding the Brain - LiveScience.com

Connectivity is Key to Understanding the Brain - LiveScience.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
LiveScience.com
Connectivity is Key to Understanding the Brain
LiveScience.com
The human brain is a marvel of neural wiring, from links between individual neurons to fibers that meander through vast brain regions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Time of day affects morality

Time of day affects morality | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Our ability to exhibit self-control to avoid cheating or lying is significantly reduced over the course of a day, making us more likely to be dishonest in the afternoon than in the morning...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

First evidence that fear memories can be reduced during sleep

First evidence that fear memories can be reduced during sleep | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A fear memory was reduced in people by exposing them to the memory over and over again while they slept. It's the first time that emotional memory has been manipulated in humans during sleep, report Northwestern Medicine scientists.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Why Do Some Brains Enjoy Fear?

Why Do Some Brains Enjoy Fear? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The science behind the appeal of haunted houses, freak shows, and physical thrills.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Thank you to the Empathy and Compassion in Society Community - Empathy and Compassion in Society

Thank you to the Empathy and Compassion in Society Community - Empathy and Compassion in Society | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Thank you for making Empathy and Compassion in Society 2013 such a remarkable gathering.

 

600 participants from 14 countries on all five continents attended the event - the youth gathering, the conference, the cultural evening and the workshops. 


Videos from the youth gathering will be available next week, in time for World Kindness Day on 13 November and for Anti-Bullying Week on 18-22 November. The conference videos including the powerpoint slides will be available to participants early in December.


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Speak Easy: FOXP2 'Language Gene' Has a Partner

Speak Easy: FOXP2 'Language Gene' Has a Partner | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Few genes have made the headlines as much as FOXP2. The first gene associated with language disorders, it was later implicated in the evolution of human speech. Girls make more of the FOXP2 protein, which may help explain their precociousness in learning to talk. Now, neuroscientists have figured out how one of its molecular partners helps Foxp2 exert its effects.

 

The findings may eventually lead to new therapies for inherited speech disorders, says Richard Huganir, the neurobiologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, who led the work. Foxp2 controls the activity of a gene called Srpx2, he notes, which helps some of the brain's nerve cells beef up their connections to other nerve cells. By establishing what SRPX2 does, researchers can look for defective copies of it in people suffering from problems talking or learning to talk.

 

Until 2001, scientists were not sure how genes influenced language. Then Simon Fisher, a neurogeneticist now at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, and his colleagues fingered FOXP2 as the culprit in a family with several members who had trouble with pronunciation, putting words together, and understanding speech. These people cannot move their tongue and lips precisely enough to talk clearly, so even family members often can’t figure out what they are saying. It “opened a molecular window on the neural basis of speech and language,” Fisher says.

 

A few years later, other researchers showed that the FOXP2 gene in humans differed from the chimp version by only two bases, the "letters" that make up DNA. That small difference may have affected Foxp2 performance such that animal calls could eventually transform into the human gift of gab. In 2009, a team put the human version of the gene in mice and observed that the rodents produced more frequent and complex alarm calls, suggesting these mutations may have been involved in the evolution of more complex speech. But how Foxp2 works has largely remained a mystery.

 

Huganir didn't start out trying to solve this mystery. He was testing 400 proteins to see if they helped or hindered the development of specialized junctions between nerve cells, called synapses, which allow nerve cells to communicate with one another. A single neuron can have up to 10,000 synapses, or connections to other neurons, Huganir says. Of the 10 proteins he identified, one that strongly promoted synapse formation was Srpx2, a gene other researchers had linked to epilepsy and language problems.

 

Huganir and his colleagues examined Srpx2 activity in isolated nerve cells, determining that it stimulated the formation of "excitatory" connections, ones where a "turn on" message was conveyed to the receiving nerve cell. Srpx2 also enhanced the number of excitatory connections in the part of the brain in developing mice that is the equivalent of the human language center, the researchers report online today in Science. Because Foxp2 regulates the activity of several genes, including Srpx2, Huganir and his team took a closer look at howFoxp2 affected this gene. When Foxp2 is around, Srpx2 makes fewer excitatory synapses, they report. It may be that the right balance of excitatory synapses and other connections may be necessary for complex vocalizations, Huganir suggests.

 

As a final test, the researchers looked to see how changing the activity of the Srpx2 gene affected alarm calls of baby mice. Mice pups separated from their moms call for help with squeals too high-pitched for humans to hear. When the researchers artificially inhibited Srpx2's activity, the mice squealed less. But the pups squealed normally again when gene activity was restored, Huganir and his colleagues report.

 

The work "shows that Foxp2 affects synapse formation through Srpx2," says Svante Pääbo, a paleogeneticist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, who has studied Foxp2 in primates and in mice. "It is the first target gene of Foxp2 that has a clear function with respect to neuronal function."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Scientists shed light on brain computations

Scientists shed light on brain computations | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—University of Queensland (UQ) scientists have made a fundamental breakthrough into how the brain decodes the visual world.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

How to Build a Happier Brain

How to Build a Happier Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A neuropsychological approach to happiness, by meeting core needs (safety, satisfaction, and connection) and training neurons to overcome a negativity bias
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Why Is Yawning Contagious? [Video] | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

Why Is Yawning Contagious? [Video] | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Contagious yawning can be annoying, but it might also be a sign of good social skills. It's a type of emotional contagion, a phenomenon in ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Researchers Shed Light on Brain Computations

Researchers Shed Light on Brain Computations | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
According to new research, dendrites play a critical role in decoding images.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

If We Could All Tap Into This Quality (Which We Can), The World Would Be A Better Place

If We Could All Tap Into This Quality (Which We Can), The World Would Be A Better Place | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In the so-called age of narcissism, it's been said that empathy is declining -- and some research has shown that social media is causing us to become more self-obsessed than ever before.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Society for Neuroscience - Art of Neuroscience

Society for Neuroscience - Art of Neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

UCLA Launches Brain Imaging Database for Chronic Pain Research - iHealthBeat

UCLA Launches Brain Imaging Database for Chronic Pain Research - iHealthBeat | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The University of California-Los Angeles has announced the launch of the Pain and Interoception Imaging Network, or PAIN, database for researching chronic pain conditions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Spooky music is spookier with your eyes closed - Scientific American (blog)

Spooky music is spookier with your eyes closed - Scientific American (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Spooky music is spookier with your eyes closed
Scientific American (blog)
They also predicted these increased negative feelings during closed eye listening sessions would cause a greater level of activation in the brain region called the amygdala.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Neuroscientists determine how treatment for anxiety disorders silences fear neurons

Neuroscientists determine how treatment for anxiety disorders silences fear neurons | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—Excessive fear can develop after a traumatic experience, leading to anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Gene found to foster synapse formation in the brain

Gene found to foster synapse formation in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found that a gene already implicated in human speech disorders and epilepsy is also needed for vocalizations and synapse formation in mice.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

'Minicomputers' Live Inside the Human Brain

'Minicomputers' Live Inside the Human Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The heart of each neuron is called the soma — a single thin cablelike fiber known as the axon that sticks out of the soma carries nerve signals away from the neuron, while many shorter branches called dendrites that project from the other end...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Musicality correlates with sociability and emotionality in Williams Syndrome

Musicality correlates with sociability and emotionality in Williams Syndrome | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Ng R, Lai P, Levitin D, Bellugi U) 

Williams Syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have toward music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill and expressivity are related to their sociable personality or their verbal intelligence. Authors examined the relationships between musicality (musical interest, creativity and expressivity), sociability (social-emotionality, social approach) and language comprehension in WS and typically developing (TD) controls. Findings suggest that emotion-expressivity through music in WS may be linked to their sensitivity and responsivity to emotions of others, whereas general interest in music may be related to greater linguistic capacity in TD individuals. Musicality and sociability may be more closely related in WS relative than in typical development; implications for future interventions for this neurodevelopmental condition will be discussed.

 

 

 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Moral in the morning, but dishonest in the afternoon

Moral in the morning, but dishonest in the afternoon | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Our ability to exhibit self-control to avoid cheating or lying is significantly reduced over the course of a day, making us more likely to be dishonest in the afternoon than in the morning, according to findings published in Psychological Science,...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Medical students taught meditation techniques to prevent burnout and improve care

Medical students taught meditation techniques to prevent burnout and improve care | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Doctors commonly tell patients that stress can be harmful to their health. Yet when it comes to reducing their own stress levels, physicians don't always heed their own advice.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Individuals Genetically Predisposed to Anxiousness May Be Less Likely to Volunteer and Help Others

Individuals Genetically Predisposed to Anxiousness May Be Less Likely to Volunteer and Help Others | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
I’ve always known, from my own experience with depression, that there is a strong connection between volunteer work and mental health.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Genes predispose some people to focus on the negative - Cornell Chronicle

Genes predispose some people to focus on the negative
Cornell Chronicle
The gene in question is the ADRA2b deletion variant, which influences the neurotransmitter norepinephrine.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Exploring the neurological substrate of emotional and social intelligence

Exploring the neurological substrate of emotional and social intelligence | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.