Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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New Alzheimers Related Memory Disorder Identified

New Alzheimers Related Memory Disorder Identified | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have defined and established a criteria for a new neurodegenerative disease which closely resembles Alzheimer's.
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Research shows evidence of mental time travel

Mental time travel, or chronesthesia, is the brain's use of memory to think about the past, present and future.
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Enriched Environments Hold Promise for Brain Injury Patients

Enriched Environments Hold Promise for Brain Injury Patients | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
According to a new study, an 'enriched environment' can help in rehabilitation for those with TBI.
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Emotional Thought: Toward an Evidence-Based Framework

Emotional Thought: Toward an Evidence-Based Framework | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang & Antonio Damasio

In general, cognition and emotion are regarded as two interrelated aspects of human functioning. However, while it is perfectly reasonable and in fact necessary to distinguish between these two aspects in studying learning and development (Fischer & Bidell, 1998), the overly stringent preservation of this dichotomy may actually obscure the fact that emotions comprise cognitive as well as sensory processes. Furthermore, the aspects of cognition that are recruited most heavily in education, including learning, attention, memory, decision making, motivation, and social functioning, are both profoundly affected by emotion and in fact subsumed within the processes of emotion. Emotions entail the perception of an emotionally competent trigger, a situation either real or imagined that has the power to induce an emotion, as well as a chain of physiological events that will enable changes in both the body and mind (Damasio, 1994). These changes in the mind, involving focusing of attention, calling up of relevant memories, and learning the associations between events and their outcomes, among other things, are the processes with which education is most concerned. Yes, rational thought and logical reasoning do exist, although hardly ever truly devoid of emotion, but they cannot be recruited appropriately and usefully in the real world without emotion. Emotions help to direct our reasoning into the sector of knowledge that is relevant to the current situation or problem.

 

Immordino-Yang, M. H., & Damasio, A. (2014). Emotional thought: Toward an evidence-based framework. The Neuropsychotherapist, 8, 4-7. doi: 10.12744/tnpt(8)004-007

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Here's What Your Brain Is Doing When You Really, Really Hate Someone

Here's What Your Brain Is Doing When You Really, Really Hate Someone | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists have spotted the parts of the brain that light up when we actively hate someone. There's probably a reason why hate evolved in the first place -- and it's similar to love.
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Science Says Lasting Relationships Come Down To 2 Basic Traits

Science Says Lasting Relationships Come Down To 2 Basic Traits | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It has to do with how people respond to their partners' "bids."

Via SustainOurEarth
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The Enormous Complexity of Transport Along the Axon

The Enormous Complexity of Transport Along the Axon | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Some scientists consider scaffolding fibers and tubules in the neuron to be the seat of consciousness.
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3D Deep Imaging Advance Likely to Drive New Biological Insights

3D Deep Imaging Advance Likely to Drive New Biological Insights | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers develop a new, fast and inexpensive imaging technique for deep tissue immunolabelling.
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Neurogenesis in the Striatum of the Adult Human Brain: Cell

Neurogenesis in the Striatum of the Adult Human Brain: Cell | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Via Dave Vago
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Choirs 'synchronise heartbeats'

Choirs 'synchronise heartbeats' | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Choir singers not only harmonise their voices, they also synchronise their heartbeats, a study suggests.

 


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Parkinson's stem cell 'breakthrough'

Parkinson's stem cell 'breakthrough' | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Researchers in Sweden claim a "breakthrough" in how stem cells could be used to treat Parkinson's disease.


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Betting on brain research: Experts review challenges of translational neuroscience

Betting on brain research: Experts review challenges of translational neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Despite great advances in understanding how the human brain works, psychiatric conditions, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain injuries are on the rise. Progress in the development of new diagnostic and treatment approaches appears to have stalled. Experts look at the challenges associated with 'translational neuroscience,' or efforts to bring advances in the lab to the patients who need them.

Via Donald J Bolger
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Donald J Bolger's curator insight, November 7, 2014 12:04 PM

Review of the issues with translational neuroscience.

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Three Myths About the Brain

Three Myths About the Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
IN the early 19th century, a French neurophysiologist named Pierre Flourens conducted a series of innovative experiments. He successively removed larger and larger portions of brain tissue from a range of animals, including pigeons, chickens and frogs, and observed how their behavior was affected.

His findings were clear and reasonably consistent. “One can remove,” he wrote in 1824, “from the front, or the back, or the top or the side, a certain portion of the cerebral lobes, without destroying their function.” For mental faculties to work properly, it seemed, just a “small part of the lobe” sufficed.

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brain-regions | the NeuRA blog

brain-regions | the NeuRA blog | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it


Key regions of the brain implicated in remembering the past, and imagining the future. Taken from Irish, Piguet and Hodges (2012). Nature Reviews Neurology, 8, 152-161.


- See more at: http://blog.neura.edu.au/2013/08/05/mental-time-travel-insights-from-semantic-dementia/brain-regions/#sthash.HFklITJ3.dpuf

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Did you know there’s a part of your brain called “the slime gland”?

Did you know there’s a part of your brain called “the slime gland”? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The blogger Neuroskeptic has created some awesome diagrams explaining the literal meaning behind the names of different parts of the brain.
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Study Probes Neuroscience of Bipolar Risk-Taking - PsychCentral.com

Study Probes Neuroscience of Bipolar Risk-Taking - PsychCentral.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers are beginning to discover some of the reasons why bipolar disorder can cause people to engage in risky behavior. The condition involves fluctuating depression and mania.
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Changes in a Single Gene’s Action Can Control Addiction- and Depression-Related Behaviors

Changes in a Single Gene’s Action Can Control Addiction- and Depression-Related Behaviors | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

New DNA regulatory technique modifies the environment around a single gene to control gene expression and behavioral consequences


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Social connections matter more than wealth—and your brain knows it

Social connections matter more than wealth—and your brain knows it | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Matt Lieberman, a distinguished social psychologist and neuroscientist, basically won the lottery. This past summer, he was offered three million dollars for an academic position—one million in raw income and two to do lab research.
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Patients with ALS have difficulty with verbs: Why?

Patients with ALS have difficulty with verbs: Why? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
According to many scientists the fact that ALS patients experience (in addition to severe motor deficits) greater linguistic difficulty with verbs denoting action compared to nouns denoting objects depends on their motor deficit.
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Brain's response to threat silenced when we are reminded of being loved and cared for

Brain's response to threat silenced when we are reminded of being loved and cared for | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Being shown pictures of others being loved and cared for reduces the brain's response to threat, new research has found.
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Modified Alzheimer's antibodies sneak through blood–brain barrier

Modified Alzheimer's antibodies sneak through blood–brain barrier | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Delivering medications to the brain could become easier, thanks to molecules that can escort drugs through the notoriously impervious sheath that separates blood vessels from neurons. In a proof-of-concept study in monkeys, biologists used the system to reduce levels of the protein amyloid-β, which accumulates in the brain plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease1.


The blood–brain barrier is a layer of cells lining the inner surface of the capillaries that feed the central nervous system. It is nature's way of protecting the delicate brain from infectious agents and toxic compounds, while letting nutrients and oxygen in and waste products out. Because the barrier strictly regulates the passage of larger molecules and often prevents drug molecules from entering the brain, it has long posed one of the most difficult challenges in developing treatments for brain disorders.


Several approaches to bypassing the barrier are being tested, including nanoparticles that are small enough to pass through the barrier's cellular membranes and deliver their payload; catheters that carry a drug directly into the brain; and ultrasound pulses that push microbubbles through the barrier. But no approach has yet found broad therapeutic application.


Neurobiologist Ryan Watts and his colleagues at the biotechnology company Genentech in South San Francisco have sought to break through the barrier by exploiting transferrin, a protein that sits on the surface of blood vessels and carries iron into the brain. The team created an antibody with two ends. One end binds loosely to transferrin and uses the protein to transport itself into the brain. And once the antibody is inside, its other end targets an enzyme called β-secretase 1 (BACE1), which produces amyloid-β. Crucially, the antibody binds more tightly to BACE1 than to transferrin, and this pulls it off the blood vessel and into the brain. It locks BACE1 shut and prevents it from making amyloid-β.


In their most recent study, published today in Science Translational Medicine1, the researchers adjusted the strength with which the antibody binds to transferrin. When they tested the drug in both mice and crab-eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis), they found that it spread throughout the animals’ brains and decreased levels of amyloid-β in their blood plasma by more than 50%. The antibody did not seem to affect the monkeys’ blood cells. It remains to be seen, however, whether the drug would mitigate the behavioural symptoms of Alzheimer's, because monkeys do not develop the disease or amyloid plaques in the way that humans do.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Science Shows Something Surprising About What Reading Poetry Does to Your Brain

Science Shows Something Surprising About What Reading Poetry Does to Your Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain actually has very different responses to poetry and prose.

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Direct brain interface between humans

Researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team's initial demonstration a year ago. In the newly published study, which involved six people, researchers were able to transmit the signals from one person's brain over the Internet and use these signals to control the hand motions of another person within a split second of sending that signal.

Via Donald J Bolger
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