Social Neuroscience Advances
6.0K views | +0 today
Follow
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
Scoop.it!

First known molecular signalling control for neurogenesis identified.

First known molecular signalling control for neurogenesis identified. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have succeeded in explaining how stem cells in the brain change to allow one type of stem cell to produce different cell types at different stages. In an openso...

Via Donald J Bolger
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Early Brain Development
Scoop.it!

Meet the Two Scientists Who Implanted a False Memory Into a Mouse

Meet the Two Scientists Who Implanted a False Memory Into a Mouse | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The prospect of tinkering precisely with memory has tantalized scientists for years. “A lot of people had been thinking along these lines,” says Sheena Josselyn, a senior neuroscientist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, who studies the cellular underpinnings of memory, “but they never dreamed that these experiments would actually work. No one ever thought that you could actually, really do this.”

Via Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Growth Factor Regenerates Damaged Nerves Without Sprouting New Blood Vessels

Growth Factor Regenerates Damaged Nerves Without Sprouting New Blood Vessels | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
VEGF-B can regenerate damaged peripheral nerves without causing new blood vessels to grow, a new study reports.
more...
Tosh's curator insight, November 18, 2014 4:58 AM

Joint replacement surgery is removing a damaged joint and replace with new one.Replacing a joint can relieve pain and help to you move and feel better.Some of symptoms are:
knee stiffens 
knees becomes stiff or swollen
difficulty walking or climbing stairs
Visit:http://goo.gl/TNoK64

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

New Brain Disease ID'd With Similarities to Alzheimer's - PsychCentral.com

New Brain Disease ID'd With Similarities to Alzheimer's - PsychCentral.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have identified a disease that has similar symptoms as Alzheimer’s yet is biologically different.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

TSRI Researchers Discover New Type of Neuron that Plays Key Role in Nicotine Addiction

TSRI Researchers Discover New Type of Neuron that Plays Key Role in Nicotine Addiction | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that the brain's reward and stress systems are actually linked.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy Curriculum
Scoop.it!

Research: The Stanford Center for Compassion & Altruism

Research: The Stanford Center for Compassion & Altruism | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Since 2009, I’ve worked with the Stanford Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education to develop and scientifically study programs that train compassion, empathy, and self-compassion, as well as to train professionals in leading such programs worldwide.
Below are some key resources related to this work.
Scientific Articles (Links to Full Text)


A randomized controlled trial of compassion cultivation training: Effects on mindfulness, affect, and emotion regulation. Jazaieri, Hooria, Kelly McGonigal, Thupten Jinpa, James R. Doty, James J. Gross, and Philippe R. Goldin. (2014). Motivation and Emotion, 38(1), 23-35.


Enhancing compassion: A randomized controlled trial of a compassion cultivation training program. Jazaieri, Hooria, Geshe Thupten Jinpa, Kelly McGonigal, Erika L. Rosenberg, Joel Finkelstein, Emiliana Simon-Thomas, Margaret Cullen, James R. Doty, James J. Gross, and Philippe R. Goldin. Journal of Happiness Studies 14, no. 4 (2013): 1113-1126.


Pilot study of a compassion meditation intervention in chronic pain. Chapin, Heather L., Beth D. Darnall, Emma M. Seppala, James R. Doty, Jennifer M. Hah, and Sean C. Mackey. Journal of Compassionate Health Care 1 (2014): 1-12.


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from leapmind
Scoop.it!

33rd Square | Where Will Big Neuroscience Take Us?

33rd Square | Where Will Big Neuroscience Take Us? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

We’re entering the era of big neuroscience. In a little over a year, the United States, Europe, Japan and Israel have launched brain research projects with big budgets and bold ambitions. Several other countries are expected to follow suit.


Via LeapMind
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Gut–brain link grabs neuroscientists

Gut–brain link grabs neuroscientists | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Idea that intestinal bacteria affect mental health gains ground.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Computer model of nerve cells provides insights into communication problems

Computer model of nerve cells provides insights into communication problems | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In diseases of the brain, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, the neurons fail to communicate correctly with each other.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Scientists find first evidence of 'local' clock in the brain

Scientists find first evidence of 'local' clock in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have gained fresh insights into how 'local' body clocks control waking and sleeping.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Brain protein influences how the brain manages stress; suggests new model of depression

Brain protein influences how the brain manages stress; suggests new model of depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain's ability to effectively deal with stress or to lack that ability and be more susceptible to depression, depends on a single protein type in each person's brain, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published November 12 in the journal Nature.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Study offers new clue into how anesthesia works

Study offers new clue into how anesthesia works | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Anesthesia, long considered a blessing to patients and surgeons, has been a mystery for much of its 160-plus-year history in the operating room.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Social Neuroscience and Psychopathology Lab: Selected Publications

Social Neuroscience and Psychopathology Lab: Selected Publications | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Dodell-Feder, D., Delisi, L. E., & Hooker, C. I. (2014). Neural disruption to theory of mind predicts daily social functioning in individuals at familial high-risk for schizophrenia. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, nst186. [Full Article]
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
Scoop.it!

Neuroimaging study begins to map damage caused by anxiety in the brain.

Neuroimaging study begins to map damage caused by anxiety in the brain. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are at increased risk of converting to Alzheimer's disease within a few years, but a new study warns the risk increases significantly if they suffer from...

Via Donald J Bolger
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Do You Want To Know About Your Brain? - New York Times (blog)

Do You Want To Know About Your Brain? - New York Times (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research suggests many people don’t think that much about brain science. Should they?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Major Brain Pathway Rediscovered after Century Old Confusion and Controversy

Major Brain Pathway Rediscovered after Century Old Confusion and Controversy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers 'rediscover' a neural pathway and provide new analytical tools which allow for easy identification of the brain structure.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Readying the neural network - Medical Xpress

Readying the neural network - Medical Xpress | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Synapse, the name for the signal-receiving site on a neuron, comes from the Greek word for contact. Neuroscientists used to maintain that neurons form one-to-one relationship to contact one another.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Morality And Empathy Make People Selfless: People Would Rather Lose Money Than See Others Get Hurt

Morality And Empathy Make People Selfless: People Would Rather Lose Money Than See Others Get Hurt | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People are willing to sacrifice more money to prevent another person from getting hurt than they are to prevent themselves from harm.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Removing the brake: How to increase brain activity and memory

Removing the brake: How to increase brain activity and memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Is it possible to rapidly increase (or decrease) the amount of information the brain can store? A new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) suggests is may be. Their research has identified a molecule that improves brain function and memory recall is improved. Published in the latest issue of Cell Reports, the study has implications for neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as autism spectral disorders and Alzheimer’s disease.


“Our findings show that the brain has a key protein called FXR1P (Fragile X Related Protein 1) that limits the production of molecules necessary for memory formation,” says RI-MUHC neuroscientist Keith Murai, the study’s senior author and Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University. “When this brake-protein is suppressed, the brain is able to store more information.”


Murai and his colleagues used a mouse model to study how changes in brain cell connections produce new memories. When FXR1P was selectively removed from certain parts of the brain, new molecules were produced. They strengthened connections between brain cells, which correlated with improved memory and recall in the mice.


“The role of FXR1P was a surprising result,” says Dr. Murai. “Previous to our work, no-one had identified a role for this regulator in the brain. Our findings have provided fundamental knowledge about how the brain processes information. We’ve identified a new pathway that directly regulates how information is handled and this could have relevance for understanding and treating brain diseases.” 


“Future research in this area could be very interesting,” he adds. “If we can identify compounds that control the braking potential of FXR1P, we may be able to alter the amount of brain activity or plasticity. For example, in autism, one may want to decrease certain brain activity and in Alzheimer’s disease, we may want to enhance the activity. By manipulating FXR1P, we may eventually be able to adjust memory formation and retrieval, thus improving the quality of life of people suffering from brain diseases.” 



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, November 17, 2014 4:28 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Diane Johnson's curator insight, November 18, 2014 9:21 AM

NGSS includes opportunities for students to understand and apply learning about information processing in biological systems

Lucile Debethune's curator insight, November 21, 2014 5:45 AM

Parmi les nombreuses proteines du cerveau, cette recherche se concentre sur la proteines FXR1P, qui agit comme un frein à la production de molécule nécessaire à la formation de molécules. Travailler sur cette protéine pourait être un élément clef dans le traitement du fonctionnement anormal du cerveau.

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Speaking multiple languages keeps your brain sharp, study claims - Daily Mail

Speaking multiple languages keeps your brain sharp, study claims - Daily Mail | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
During tests, researchers from Northewestern University, found that bilingual speakers are better at filtering out competing words because their brains are used to controlling two languages.
more...
Djeiny Drielly's curator insight, November 16, 2014 10:51 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Do spinal cord injuries cause subsequent brain damage?

Do spinal cord injuries cause subsequent brain damage? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Most research on spinal cord injuries has focused on effects due to spinal cord damage and scientists have neglected the effects on brain function.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

With age comes a better understanding of social signals

With age comes a better understanding of social signals | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—Neuroscientists have discovered an unexpected benefit of getting older – a more nuanced understanding of social signals, such as the age of others.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Have you taken the trillion odor challenge?

Have you taken the trillion odor challenge? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—Butterscotch can be made by heating brown sugar and butter together according to some predefined proportion. Although one might imagine an infinite variety of butterscotches might be crafted through the addition of extra ingredients like salt, vanilla, cream, honey or even rum, the ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
Scoop.it!

How to Study the Brain

How to Study the Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Neuroscience is almost 200 years old. Why are there no grand theories of how the brain works?

Via Donald J Bolger
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Total recall: The science behind it

Total recall: The science behind it | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Is it possible to change the amount of information the brain can store? Maybe, according to a new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC).
more...
No comment yet.