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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Neuroscientists decode brain maps to discover how we take aim

Neuroscientists decode brain maps to discover how we take aim | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Serena Williams won her third consecutive US Open title a few days ago, thanks to reasons including obvious ones like physical strength and endurance.
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Psychiatrists Embrace Deep-Brain Stimulation

Psychiatrists Embrace Deep-Brain Stimulation | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Brain-stimulation procedures for psychiatric disorders are on the rise. Should we be concerned?
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Your Fingertips Perform Brain-like Calculations

Your Fingertips Perform Brain-like Calculations | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Your brain has a lot to think about, so if there’s a way to outsource a few mental tasks to save bandwidth, it’s going to do it.
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Two-Day Workshop on Mindful Self-Compassion | Center for Mind Body Health

Two-Day Workshop on Mindful Self-Compassion | Center for Mind Body Health | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Join us for this two-day workshop to learn the core skills of the 8-week Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) training, an empirically-supported program designed to cultivate self-compassion using meditation, daily life practices, lecture, group exercises and discussion.


Self-compassion is an emotional skill that can be learned by anyone. Recent research has shown that self-compassion greatly enhances emotional wellbeing, reduces anxiety and depression, enhances coping, promotes health behaviors, and increases motivation. This workshop is open to anyone wanting to learn essential tools for treating yourself in a respectful, compassionate way whenever you suffer, fail, or feel inadequate. This is a great way to overcome pleasing others and practicing more self-care.


 You’ll learn:

  • What self-compassion is and isn’t
  • Self-compassion practices for daily life
  • How to motivate yourself with kindness rather than criticism
  • The art of loving-kindness meditation
  • How to handle difficult emotions with greater ease
  • How to transform challenging relationships
  • How to use self-compassion in caregiving situations
  • How to enjoy your life more fully

Via Edwin Rutsch
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The neuroscience of leadership

The neuroscience of leadership | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Time for a new science of leadership? (Neuroscience shows how emotional regulation and cognitive discipline empower #decisions and #leadership.
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Scientists use light to change the emotional association of memories - PsyPost

Scientists use light to change the emotional association of memories - PsyPost | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By manipulating neural circuits in the brain of mice, scientists have altered the emotional associations of specific memories.
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Researchers identify new rare neuromuscular disease

Researchers identify new rare neuromuscular disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
An international team of researchers has identified a new inherited neuromuscular disorder.
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Can neuroscience and behaviour mapping show the way?

Can neuroscience and behaviour mapping show the way? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Behaviour Mapping is taking psychometric testing to a more individual levelIt is scientifically underpinned and highly reliableBehaviour Mapping has many applications for L&D and HR adapting to change

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One of the areas that has gathered incredible momentum in the last couple of years is that of neuroscience and how it is being applied in marketing, sales, leadership and performance. Although still in it’s early stages, concepts are being incorporated into our daily lives now particularly in neuromarketing, neuro-selling and decision making. One exciting concept now with us, is that of behaviour mapping, which has incorporated all the global research of neuroscientists for the past 20 years and been developed into a robust and scientifically tested online instrument. It identifies that the true origin of all behaviour is that of brain science and that true performance is the outcome of behaviour and cognitive processing.

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Although the brain is hugely complex and we are still a long way off from understanding all its interactions fully, we are able to understand how the structure, chemical and neural pathway development individualises each of us, to demonstrate our behaviours in response to our perception of the world. This individuality can be highlighted in terms of visual maps of the employee’s underlying, adaptive and consistent behaviour preferences together with detailed reports of personal profile, benchmarking, work preference, aptitude and environment, emotional intelligence, Big 5 personality, and mental toughness.

The importance of behaviour preferences and their intensity is that research proves that if an individual is able to demonstrate these preferences in their work then they will be totally committed, engaged, motivated and perform at their optimal level. They will also enjoy the best health and wellbeing which is good news for them and the organisation.

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So the outcome of mapping can demonstrate strategic fits between an individual and the role, environment or organisation and can be used as a starting point for further development in the strengthening of required performance behaviours and in some cases a reduction where they are shown to be overdone. No two outputs are the same. An example of behaviour mapping within recruitment and selection from 'The Psychological Bulletin Vol 96 No1', highlights that when suitability tests are added after eligibility checks the success formula rises from 14% success rate by interview alone to a high 93% if job benchmarking, work aptitude assessment and work environment matching is added.

So in conclusion as identified in the latest research, L&D departments are experiencing shifts in their responsibilities away from organisational structures that direct, plan and control, towards ones that are embracing individuality and allowing self-direction towards knowledge-based capabilities. These support performance cultures through behaviour change and assists with extra information on these individuals, as opposed to groups of individuals in certain categories.



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iPamba's curator insight, September 4, 2014 6:14 PM

This article points to brain-based behaviour mapping as a part of human resources recruitment processes. A new take on brain fitness - Does your brain fit our organization?

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Direct brain-to-brain communication demonstrated in human subjects

Direct brain-to-brain communication demonstrated in human subjects | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

In a first-of-its-kind study, an international team of neuroscientists and robotics engineers has demonstrated the viability of direct brain-to-brain communication in humans.


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Neural coordination can be enhanced by occasional interruption of normal firing patterns: A self-optimizing spiking neural network model

The state space of a conventional Hopfield network typically exhibits many different attractors of which only a small subset satisfy constraints between neurons in a globally optimal fashion. It has recently been demonstrated that combining Hebbian learning with occasional alterations of normal neural states avoids this problem by means of self-organized enlargement of the best basins of attraction. However, so far it is not clear to what extent this process of self-optimization is also operative in real brains. Here we demonstrate that it can be transferred to more biologically plausible neural networks by implementing a self-optimizing spiking neural network model. In addition, by using this spiking neural network to emulate a Hopfield network with Hebbian learning, we attempt to make a connection between rate-based and temporal coding based neural systems. Although further work is required to make this model more realistic, it already suggests that the efficacy of the self-optimizing process is independent from the simplifying assumptions of a conventional Hopfield network. We also discuss natural and cultural processes that could be responsible for occasional alteration of neural firing patterns in actual brains


Neural coordination can be enhanced by occasional interruption of normal firing patterns: A self-optimizing spiking neural network model
Alexander Woodward, Tom Froese, Takashi Ikegami

http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.0470


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Functional organization of the insula and inner perisylvian regions

In the last few years, the insula has been the focus of many brain-imaging studies, mostly devoted to clarify its role in emotions and social communication. Physiological data, however, on which one may ground these correlative findings are almost totally lacking. Here, we investigated the functional properties of the insular cortex in behaving monkeys using intracortical microstimulation. Behavioral responses and heart rate changes were recorded. The results showed that the insula is functionally formed by two main subdivisions: (i) a sensorimotor field occupying the caudal–dorsal portion of the insula and appearing as an extension of the parietal lobe; and (ii) a mosaic of orofacial motor programs located in the anterior and centroventral insula sector.


Via Donald J Bolger
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Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep

Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Mouse brains get washed with cerebrospinal fluid while they sleep. Humans may use the same process.

Via Donald J Bolger
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Licia Freeman's curator insight, March 24, 2014 1:28 PM

One more benefit of sleep!

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Rapid whole-brain imaging with single cell resolution

Rapid whole-brain imaging with single cell resolution | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Via Donald J Bolger
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Donald J Bolger's curator insight, August 13, 2014 11:15 AM

This sounds too good to be true!

 

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MRI Shows Gray Matter Myelin Loss Strongly Related to MS Disability

MRI Shows Gray Matter Myelin Loss Strongly Related to MS Disability | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new MRI study finds myelin loss in the gray matter of people's brains with MS is closely correlated with the severity of the disease.

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Brain structure could predict risky behavior

Brain structure could predict risky behavior | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Some people avoid risks at all costs, while others will put their wealth, health, and safety at risk without a thought.
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Xenon could provide protection for the brain after a blow to the head

Xenon could provide protection for the brain after a blow to the head | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Injuries from a blow to the head are a two-stage affair, with the primary injury caused by the initial impact being followed by a secondary injury that develops in the subsequent hours and days.
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EmpathyWorks: Against Empathy?

EmpathyWorks: Against Empathy? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Paul Bloom, Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science at Yale University, recently wrote a thought provoking (and emotion provoking) post on Boston Review, entitled, Against Empathy?.


He writes about the downside of relying on empathy, particularly "emotional empathy", as a guide to action. Emotional empathy, he argues, is biased, clouds our thinking, and promotes moral errors, which may have dire consequences. He writes:


"Empathy is biased; we are more prone to feel empathy for attractive people and for those who look like us or share our ethnic or national background. And empathy is narrow; it connects us to particular individuals, real or imagined, but is insensitive to numerical differences and statistical data.


by Michael Goldstein


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Model captures the process that individuals use within social networks to reach consensus - PsyPost

Model captures the process that individuals use within social networks to reach consensus - PsyPost | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Social networks have become a dominant force in society.
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Political Neuroscience: The Beginning of a Beautiful Friendship - Jost - 2014 - Political Psychology - Wiley Online Library

Political Neuroscience: The Beginning of a Beautiful Friendship - Jost - 2014 - Political Psychology - Wiley Online Library | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
John T. Jost, H. Hannah Nam, David M. Amodio and Jay J. Van Bavel

Article first published online: 22 JAN 2014

DOI: 10.1111/pops.12162



The emergence of political neuroscience—an interdisciplinary venture involving political science, psychology, and cognitive neuroscience—has piqued the interests of scholars as well as the mass public. In this chapter, we review evidence pertaining to four areas of inquiry that have generated most of the research in political neuroscience to date: (1) racial prejudice and intergroup relations; (2) the existence of partisan bias and motivated political cognition; (3) the nature of left-right differences in political orientation; and (4) the dimensional structure of political attitudes. Although these topics are well-known to political psychologists, the application of models and methods from neuroscience has renewed interest in each of them and yielded novel insights. There is reason to believe that many other areas of political psychology await similarly promising renewals and that innovative methods will continue to advance our understanding of the physiological processes involved in political cognition, evaluation, judgment, and behavior. We address limitations, criticisms, and potential pitfalls of existing work—including the “chicken-and-egg problem”—and propose an ambitious agenda for the next generation of research in political neuroscience.

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Visualising plastic changes to the brain

Visualising plastic changes to the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Tinnitus, migraine, epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s: all these are examples of diseases with neurological causes, the treatment and study of which is more and more frequently being carried out by means of magnetic stimulation of...
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What happens in the brain when you learn a language?

What happens in the brain when you learn a language? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Kara Morgan-Short using electrophysiology to examine the inner workings of the brain during language learning. Photograph: Yara Mekawi/University of Illinois


Scans and neuroscience are helping scientists understand what happens to the brain when you learn a second language


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Adaptable decision making in the brain

Adaptable decision making in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have discovered how a part of the brain helps predict future events from past experiences.

Via Donald J Bolger
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Protein essential for cognition and mental health identified

Protein essential for cognition and mental health identified | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The ability to maintain mental representations of ourselves and the world -- the fundamental building block of human cognition -- arises from the firing of highly evolved neuronal circuits, a process that is weakened in schizophrenia.

Via Donald J Bolger
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UCI researchers find epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders

UCI researchers find epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Dysfunction in dopamine signaling profoundly changes the activity level of about 2,000 genes in the brain’s prefrontal cortex and may be an underlying cause of certain complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, according to UC Irvine scientists.

Via Donald J Bolger
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