Social Neuroscience Advances
5.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

The Neuroscience of Altruism

The Neuroscience of Altruism | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In The Altruistic Brain, neurobiologist Donald Pfaff makes the case that humans are hard-wired for good.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Prospects for Treating Chronic Pain Are Improving

Prospects for Treating Chronic Pain Are Improving | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Burning. Aching. Shooting. Whatever form it takes, chronic pain can defy treatment. New insights into the causes are leading to fresh ideas for combating it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Brain reward circuits respond differently to two kinds of sugar

Brain reward circuits respond differently to two kinds of sugar | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain responds differently to two kinds of sugar, according to a report today at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology annual meeting in Phoenix Arizona.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

The Seemingly Normal Dutch Village Where Everyone Suffers from Dementia

The isolated Dutch village of Hogewey, located on the outskirts of the town of Weesp, has only 152 inhabitants who seem to be living a normal life – they eat, sleep, walk around the village and visit shops and restaurants.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Counselling and More
Scoop.it!

Book: "Empathy", by Roman Krznaric

Book: "Empathy", by Roman Krznaric | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"...By using techniques such as concentrated listening during conversations, imagining the world from an alternative perspective through exposure to literature, movies, art and music, and connecting via social media and other venues on hot topics such as “economic inequality, disability rights, climate change, and gender justice,” one acquires the ability to understand other people rather than just pity or feel sorry for them. The skill to truly understand someone else leads to potential change not only in the outer world, but also in a person’s inner realm, as it creates “human bonds that make life worth living.”..."


Via Edwin Rutsch, Dimitris Tsantaris
more...
Julianna Bonola's curator insight, November 10, 2014 12:56 AM

When we understand what another feels, a funny thing happens, we learn to understand and be gentler on ourselves.

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Brain Training Doesn’t Make You Smarter

Brain Training Doesn’t Make You Smarter | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists doubt claims from brain training companies
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

7 Mind-Bending Mysteries That Neuroscientists Are on the Verge of Solving

7 Mind-Bending Mysteries That Neuroscientists Are on the Verge of Solving | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Sponsored by GE | Brain scientists are tackling life's eternal mysteries — and they're making progress.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Improved Outcomes Using Brain SPECT-Guided Treatment Versus Treatment-as-Usual in Community Psychiatric Outpatients: A Retrospective Case-Control Study: The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical ...

Brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans indirectly show functional activity via measurement of regional cerebral blood flow. Thirty patients at a community-based psychiatric clinic underwent brain SPECT scans. Changes in scoring of before-treatment and after-treatment scans correlated well with changes in patient Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores before treatment and after treatment. Patients were retrospectively matched with controls with similar diagnoses and pretreatment GAF scores, and those who underwent SPECT-guided treatment improved significantly more than the control patients.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Family-Centred Care Practice
Scoop.it!

Truth about Schizophrenia

Truth about Schizophrenia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Schizophrenia is perhaps the most mysterious and poorly understood mental disorder that is often misrepresented by popular media and literature. I often receive inquires from the clients who are worried that they might be developing this disorder. Frequently, they base their "self-diagnosis" on incomplete or plain wrong information received from the popular sources.

Via Velvet Martin
more...
Jessica James's curator insight, December 9, 2014 11:32 PM

1. This article is very resourceful for people who are dealing with someone who is schizophrenic. It lays out all the guidelines about the illness in a simple but accurate manner.

2. Everything that is said in this article correlates with the text books and websites. It talks about how the drugs are dangerous and increase your symptoms of schizophrenia. Myers (2014) says the same thing. It says that any drug that increases your dopamine level shouldn't be used when you have schizophrenia (Myers, 2014). This article also talks about the different things that can trigger schizophrenia. Myers (2014) says the same thing, that depression, stress or genetics can cause someone to suffer from schizophrenia (Myers, 2014). They also say that people that suffer from schizophrenia can get help through medications. Tartakovsky (2010) said the same thing; that the medications will help reduce hallucinations and bizarre behavior and help the patient to lead a normal life (Tartakovsky, 2010).

3. There was nothing in this article that addressed diversity. That seems to be a theme in all these articles.

4.

Myers, D. G. (2014). Exploring psychology in modules: With dsm5 update. S.l.: Worth Pub.

 

Tartakovsky, M. (2010). Illuminating 13 Myths of Schizophrenia. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 30, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/lib/illuminating-13-myths-of-schizophrenia/0002709

  

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Alive Inside: How music can help fight dementia. » Sociology Lens

Alive Inside: How music can help fight dementia. » Sociology Lens | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Midlife Crisis: Why Middle-Aged Women Have The Highest Rate Of Depression

Midlife Crisis: Why Middle-Aged Women Have The Highest Rate Of Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Middle-aged women have the highest rate of depression in the U.S. and very few are seeking the help of mental health professional.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Taming neural excitations: Controlling harmful signals such as those in strokes

Taming neural excitations: Controlling harmful signals such as those in strokes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What do lasers, neural networks, and spreading epidemics have in common? They share a most basic feature whereby an initial pulse can propagate through a medium – be it physical, biological or socio-economic, respectively.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Scientists find neurons that act as a 3D compass in the brain

Scientists find neurons that act as a 3D compass in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Pilots are trained to guard against vertigo: a sudden loss of the sense of vertical direction that renders them unable to tell “up” from “down” and sometimes even leads to crashes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Talking Mastery and Social Intelligence with Author Robert Greene

Talking Mastery and Social Intelligence with Author Robert Greene | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Five time international bestselling author Robert Greene shares his thoughts on creativity, finding your calling, social intelligence and his latest book about what it means to be a master of your craft.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Laughing gas for depression? Nitrous oxide shows early promise as a potential treatment

Laughing gas for depression? Nitrous oxide shows early promise as a potential treatment | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, has shown early promise as a potential treatment for severe depression in patients whose symptoms don’t respond to standard therapies. The pilot study, at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Counselling and More
Scoop.it!

Harvard Unveils MRI Study Proving Mindfulness Meditation Rebuilds The Brain

Harvard Unveils MRI Study Proving Mindfulness Meditation Rebuilds The Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Participating in an eight-week mindfulness meditation program appears to make measurable changes in brain regions associated with memory, sense of self, empathy, and stress. In a study that will appear in the Jan. 30 issue of Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, a team led by Harvard-affiliated researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) reported the results of their study, the first to document meditation-produced changes over time in the brain’s gray matter.

“Although the practice of meditation is associated with a sense of peacefulness and physical relaxation, practitioners have long claimed that meditation also provides cognitive and psychological benefits that persist throughout the day,” says study senior author Sara Lazar of the MGH Psychiatric Neuroimaging Research Program and a Harvard Medical School instructor in psychology. “This study demonstrates that changes in brain structure may underlie some of these reported improvements and that people are not just feeling better because they are spending time relaxing.”

 

 [click on the title for the full article]




Via Dimitris Tsantaris
more...
Peter Keller's curator insight, December 6, 2014 12:51 PM

Yep the ancient cultures knew that thousands of years ago.

Cristina Pinto Teixeira's curator insight, January 7, 2015 8:36 AM

Mais uma vantagem do Mindfulness

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Scientists find the part of your brain that’s giving you chocolate cravings

Scientists find the part of your brain that’s giving you chocolate cravings | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
British scientists have found a brain mechanism they think may drive our desire for glucose-rich food and say the discovery could one day lead to better treatments for obesity.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Dopamine helps with math rules as well as mood

Dopamine helps with math rules as well as mood | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The chemical messenger dopamine – otherwise known as the happiness hormone – is important not only for motivation and motor skills. It seems it can also help neurons with difficult cognitive tasks. Torben Ott, Simon Jacob and Professor Andreas Nieder of Tübingen's Institute for Neurobiology have ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Neuronal Networks and Brain Waves

Neuronal Networks and Brain Waves | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Along with 80 billion neurons and 800 trillion constantly changing connections, individual neurons use very precise rhythms and groups of neurons oscillating together in very specific frequencies.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

First micro-structure atlas of the human brain completed: October 2012

First micro-structure atlas of the human brain completed: October 2012 | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
19 October 2012 See report Here A European team of scientists have built the first atlas of white-matter microstructure in the human brain. The project’s final results have the potential to change ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Cognitive Psychology of Moral Intuitions by Daniel Kahneman, Cass R. Sunstein :: SSRN

Cognitive Psychology of Moral Intuitions by Daniel Kahneman, Cass R. Sunstein :: SSRN | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Abstract:     
Moral intuitions operate in much the same way as other intuitions do; what makes the moral domain so distinctive is its foundations in the emotions, beliefs, and response tendencies that define indignation. The intuitive system of cognition, System I, is typically responsible for indignation; the more reflective system, System II, may or may not provide an override. Moral dumbfounding and moral numbness are often a product of moral intuitions that people are unable to justify. An understanding of indignation helps to explain the operation of many phenomena of interest to law and politics: the outrage heuristic, the centrality of harm, the role of reference states, moral framing, and the act-omission distinction. Because of the operation of indignation, it is extremely difficult for people to achieve coherence in their moral intuitions. Legal and political institutions usually aspire to be deliberative, and to pay close attention to System II; but even in deliberative institutions, System I can make some compelling demands.

Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Images of brain after mild stroke predict future risk

Images of brain after mild stroke predict future risk | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A CT scan of the brain within 24 hours of a mild, non-disabling stroke can predict when patients will be at the highest risk of another stroke or when symptoms may worsen, according to new research published in the American Heart Association...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

'Satiety hormone' leptin links obesity to high blood pressure

'Satiety hormone' leptin links obesity to high blood pressure | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Leptin, a hormone that regulates the amount of fat stored in the body, also drives the increase in blood pressure that occurs with weight gain, according to researchers from Monash University and the University of Cambridge.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Better detection, prevention, and pre-clinical treatment: 3 effective tools in the fight against Alzheimer’s

Better detection, prevention, and pre-clinical treatment: 3 effective tools in the fight against Alzheimer’s | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Detection, prevention, and preclinical treatment are three key areas that may make a difference in the battle to reduce the rapid rise of new Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cases every year.
more...
No comment yet.