Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Posttraumatic stress disorder reveals imbalance between signalling systems in the brain

Posttraumatic stress disorder reveals imbalance between signalling systems in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Experiencing a traumatic event can cause life-long anxiety problems, called posttraumatic stress disorder. Researchers from Uppsala University and Karolinska Institutet now show that people with posttraumatic stress disorder have an imbalance between two neurochemical systems in the brain, serotonin and substance P. The greater the imbalance, the more serious the symptoms patients have.
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Men are from Mars, women are from Venus? New brain study says not

Men are from Mars, women are from Venus? New brain study says not | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Authors say scans show need to think beyond an individual’s sex as each brain has unique “mosaic” of sex-based features plus some common to both sexes
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Synapse discovery could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease

Synapse discovery could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A team of researchers led by UNSW Australia scientists has discovered how connections between brain cells are destroyed in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease – work that opens up a new avenue for research on possible treatments for the...
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The hormone oxytocin increases the willingness to donate to social sustainability projects

The hormone oxytocin increases the willingness to donate to social sustainability projects | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Nowadays, much emphasis is placed on sustainability. The degree to which people are willing to donate their own money for this depends on their level of oxytocin.
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Video: A closer look at what happens inside the brain when a concussion occurs

Video: A closer look at what happens inside the brain when a concussion occurs | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Video: What distinguishes a concussion from a run of the mill bump on the head? We take a closer look at what this brain trauma looks like
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Empathy and the Brain - YouTube

NVC Trainer Eric Bowers explains how empathy supports our brains and nervous systems.


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What does a memory in my brain look like?

What does a memory in my brain look like? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Memories are not just about the past: they are what thought and self are made of. Clare Wilson visits the brain's vaults to find out how they actually work
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Study shows white matter damage caused by 'skunk-like' cannabis

Study shows white matter damage caused by 'skunk-like' cannabis | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Smoking high potency 'skunk-like' cannabis can damage a crucial part of the brain responsible for communication between the two brain hemispheres, according to a new study by scientists from King's College London and Sapienza University of Rome.
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Celldex's brain cancer vaccine Rintega shows survival advantage at 2-year mark - FierceVaccines

Celldex's brain cancer vaccine Rintega shows survival advantage at 2-year mark - FierceVaccines | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Celldex touted what it called the "consistent, impressive story" of its cancer vaccine Rintega this week as it released positive long-term survival data.

Via Krishan Maggon
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Effects of Yoga Versus Walking on Mood, Anxiety, and Brain GABA Levels: A Randomized Controlled MRS Study

Effects of Yoga Versus Walking on Mood, Anxiety, and Brain GABA Levels: A Randomized Controlled MRS Study | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The 12-week yoga intervention was associated with greater improvements in mood and anxiety than a metabolically matched walking exercise. This is the first study to demonstrate that increased thalamic GABA levels are associated with improved mood and decreased anxiety. It is also the first time that a behavioral intervention (i.e., yoga postures) has been associated with a positive correlation between acute increases in thalamic GABA levels and improvements in mood and anxiety scales.

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Umbilical cells help eye's neurons connect

Umbilical cells help eye's neurons connect | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Cells isolated from human umbilical cord tissue have been shown to produce molecules that help retinal neurons from the eyes of rats grow, connect and survive, according to Duke University researchers working with Janssen Research & Development, LLC.
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New Understanding of Cause of Alzheimer’s Symptoms - Amyloid Plaques Could Be Strangling Blood Vessels

New Understanding of Cause of Alzheimer’s Symptoms - Amyloid Plaques Could Be Strangling Blood Vessels | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study reports amyloid plaques could be strangling blood vessels and this could account for memory loss and other Alzheimer's symptoms.

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How To Wire Your Brain For Happiness

How To Wire Your Brain For Happiness | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The secret to lasting happiness might be neatly summed up in a cheesy neuroscience joke: "The neurons that fire together, wire together."

"It’s a classic saying, and it’

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Brains of Introverts Reveal Why They Prefer Being Alone

Brains of Introverts Reveal Why They Prefer Being Alone | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study may help explain why extroverts are more motivated to seek the company of others than are introverts.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*, Marc Wachtfogel, PhD, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s curator insight, December 1, 2015 6:29 PM

This could explain why you are introverted or extroverted.

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New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function

New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques - structures that are responsible for memory loss and a decline in cognitive function in Alzheimer’s patients. If a...
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The end of migraines is close: A new drug could stop debilitating headaches before they start

The end of migraines is close: A new drug could stop debilitating headaches before they start | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The 63-year-old chief executive couldn't do his job. He had been crippled by migraine headaches throughout his adult life and was in the middle of a new string of attacks.
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White Matter Changes Associated with Resting Sympathetic Tone in Frontotemporal Dementia vs. Alzheimer’s Disease

White Matter Changes Associated with Resting Sympathetic Tone in Frontotemporal Dementia vs. Alzheimer’s Disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

by Mario F. Mendez, Aditi Joshi, Madelaine Daianu, Elvira Jimenez, Paul Thompson 

AbstractBackground


Resting sympathetic tone, a measure of physiological arousal, is decreased in patients with apathy and inertia, such as those with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and other frontally-predominant disorders.

Objective


To identify the neuroanatomical correlates of skin conductance levels (SCLs), an index of resting sympathetic tone and apathy, among patients with bvFTD, where SCLs is decreased, compared to those with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), where it is not.

Methods


This study analyzed bvFTD (n = 14) patients and a comparison group with early-onset AD (n = 19). We compared their resting SCLs with gray matter and white matter regions of interest and white matter measures of fiber integrity on magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging.

Results


As expected, bvFTD patients, compared to AD patients, had lower SCLs, which correlated with an apathy measure, and more gray matter loss and abnormalities of fiber integrity (fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity) in frontal-anterior temporal regions. After controlling for group membership, the SCLs were significantly correlated with white matter volumes in the cingulum and inferior parietal region in the right hemisphere.

Conclusion


Among dementia patients, SCLs, and resting sympathetic tone, may correlate with quantity of white matter, rather than with gray matter or with white matter fiber integrity. Loss of white matter volumes, especially involving a right frontoparietal network, may reflect chronic loss of cortical axons that mediate frontal control of resting sympathetic tone, changes that could contribute to the apathy and inertia of bvFTD and related disorders.


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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, November 30, 2015 1:58 AM

Citation: Mendez MF, Joshi A, Daianu M, Jimenez E, Thompson P (2015) White Matter Changes Associated with Resting Sympathetic Tone in Frontotemporal Dementia vs. Alzheimer’s Disease. PLoS ONE 10(11): e0142445. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0142445

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How Synapses are Destroyed in Early Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

How Synapses are Destroyed in Early Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have discovered a new molecular mechanism that directly contributes to synapse loss in people with Alzheimer's disease.
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Brain structure may be root of apathy

Brain structure may be root of apathy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When brain scientists at Oxford University studied apathy, they didn't expect to see less motivated people making more effort. Their results suggest that for some people traditionally perceived as lazy, it's biology - not attitude - that might be the cause.
A team of neuroscientists at Oxford, funded by The Wellcome Trust, decided to study young people to see if there were any differences in the brains of those who were motivated compared to those who were apathetic.
Masud Husain, Professor of Neurology and Cognitive Neuroscience, explained: 'We know that in some cases people can become pathologically apathetic, for example after a stroke or with Alzheimer's disease. Many such patients can be physically capable. Yet they can become so demotivated they won't be bothered to care for themselves, even though they're not depressed. By studying healthy people, we wanted to find out whether any differences in their brains might shed light on apathy.'
Forty healthy volunteers completed a questionnaire that scored them on how motivated they were. They were then asked to play a game in which they were made offers, each with a different level of reward and physical effort required to win the reward. Unsurprisingly, offers with high rewards requiring low effort were usually accepted, while low rewards requiring high effort were less popular.
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Smoking high strength cannabis may damage nerve fibres in brain

Smoking high strength cannabis may damage nerve fibres in brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Study suggests high levels of skunk use may affect the brain’s white matter, making communication between the right and left hemispheres less efficient High-strength cannabis may damage nerve fibres that handle the flow of messages across the two...
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5 Scientifically Proven Benefits of Gratitude - #4. Increased helpfulness and empath

5 Scientifically Proven Benefits of Gratitude -  #4. Increased helpfulness and empath | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

4. Increased helpfulness and empathy

One 2006 study in the journal Psychological Science found that those who expressed more gratitude were also more likely to help out others. So “pro-social” behaviors are in turn linked to greater happiness.

Empathy also apparently increases when people are thankful. A 2012 paper in Social Psychology and Personality Science found that higher levels of gratitude were linked to greater empathy and lowered aggression. “Gratitude motivates people to express sensitivity and concern for others,” the researchers wrote.


 BY DOUGLAS MAIN 


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Fluctuation-Driven Neural Dynamics Reproduce Drosophila Locomotor Patterns

Fluctuation-Driven Neural Dynamics Reproduce  Drosophila  Locomotor Patterns | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Author Summary The brain is never quiet. Even in the absence of environmental cues, neurons receive and produce an ongoing barrage of fluctuating signals. These fluctuations are well studied in the sensory periphery but their potential influence on central circuits and behavior are unknown. In particular, activity fluctuations in action selection circuits—neural populations that drive an animal’s actions from moment to moment—may strongly influence behavior. To shed light on the influence of

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Arjen ten Have's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:04 PM

This is not only a research that has direct biological impact. More importantly it shows how complexity can arise and it is yet another step in explaining how evolution of complex organisms, doing even more complex things as driving a car through a busy city center, can actually have taken place!

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Neurological underpinnings of schizophrenia just as complex as the disorder itself

Neurological underpinnings of schizophrenia just as complex as the disorder itself | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Schizophrenia, a severe mental disorder affecting about one in 100 people, is notoriously difficult to diagnose and treat, in large part because it manifests differently in different people.
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Empathy Reduces the Effects of Pain

Empathy Reduces the Effects of Pain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Empathy can be an effective tool for reducing pain, according to results from a placebo analgesia study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.


The researchers were able to determine that participants who experienced placebo analgesia reported decreased empathy for pain. These results were linked to reduced engagement of the brain region associated with shared activations of both pain and empathy.


... "The present results show that empathy is strongly and directly grounded in our own experiences – even in their bodily and neural underpinnings,” Lamm concluded.


Rachel Lutz


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Novel Nanocarriers Open Door to Better Treatment for Brain Cancer | GEN News Highlights | GEN

Novel Nanocarriers Open Door to Better Treatment for Brain Cancer | GEN News Highlights | GEN | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Get the latest in biotechnology through daily news coverage as well as analysis, features, tutorials, webinars, podcasts, and blogs. Learn about the entire bioproduct life cycle from early-stage R&D, to applied research including omics, biomarkers, as well as diagnostics, to bioprocessing and commercialization.

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