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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Potential Alzheimer's drug prevents abnormal blood clots in the brain

Potential Alzheimer's drug prevents abnormal blood clots in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Without a steady supply of blood, neurons can't work.
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Why brain research is vital: Column - USA TODAY

Why brain research is vital: Column - USA TODAY | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

To those whose loved ones struggle with mental illnesses and to researchers who know how close we are to new discoveries, the National Institutes of Health's recent budget proposal is...

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We feel as we speak: Researchers explain the link between language and emotions

We feel as we speak: Researchers explain the link between language and emotions | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A team of researchers headed by the Erfurt-based psychologist Prof. Ralf Rummer and the Cologne-based phoneticist Prof. Martine Grice has carried out some ground-breaking experiments to uncover the links between language and emotions.
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Developmental psychologist explains her life’s work studying the mysteries of the mind

Developmental psychologist explains her life’s work studying the mysteries of the mind | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Developmental psychologist Daphne Maurer has spent more than four decades studying the complexities of the human mind.
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Stunning 3D 'glass brain' shows neurons firing off in real-time

Stunning 3D 'glass brain' shows neurons firing off in real-time | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
brain? Now you can find out using a new system that peers into the storm of activity in real-time.

Via João Sodré
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Study Links Empathy To Brain Physiology - YouTube

Do you cry at the drop of a hat? Or feel the overwhelming urge to help those in need? You might be a highly sensitive person, generally predisposed to empathy. CBS 2's Vanessa Murdock reports.


http://newyork.cbslocal.com/video/10307552-study-links-empathy-to-brain-physiology/



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"Mind in Life" with Evan Thompson - Brainscience Podcast


Via David McGavock
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David McGavock's curator insight, June 27, 2014 10:27 AM

Evan Thompson also authored, "The embodied Mind" in 1991. 

 

"Embodied Cognition is a movement within cognitive science that argues that the mind is inseparable from the fact that the brain is embedded in a physical body. This means that everything that the brain does, from the simplest perception to complex decision-making, relies on the interaction of the body with its environment.  Evan Thompson's book, Mind in Life: Biology, Phenomenology, and the Sciences of Mind, is an in-depth look at what he calls the "enactive" approach to embodied cognition. The enactive approach was pioneered by Thompson's mentor Francisco Varela, and it emphasizes the importance of the body's active engagement with its environment."


The ideas discussed in this interview have implications to the process of learning in that it lends support to learning that is active - involves the body. Also discussed is the field or practice or neuro-phenomenology. While not without controversy, this approach brings into account people's subjective experience in neuroscientific research.

 

"Neuro-phenomenology refers to an approach to neuroscience that incorporates information about experience. In particular, it seeks to train experimental subjects to describe their experience using terms from phenomenology, so that it will be possible to compare results between subjects." - Campbell

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What god does to your brain: Controversial science of neurotheology aims to ... - Vancouver Sun

What god does to your brain: Controversial science of neurotheology aims to ... - Vancouver Sun | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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How You Can Catch Stress - Huffington Post

How You Can Catch Stress - Huffington Post | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
How You Can Catch Stress
Huffington Post
Marco Iacoboni, MD, PhD, a professor and neuroscientist at UCLA's Brain Research Institute, says electrically excitable brain cells called mirror neurons may be responsible for the reaction.
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Controlling body movement with light: Neuroscientists inhibit muscle contractions by shining light on spinal cord neurons

Controlling body movement with light: Neuroscientists inhibit muscle contractions by shining light on spinal cord neurons | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists report that they can inhibit muscle contractions by shining light on spinal cord neurons. The researchers studied mice in which a light-sensitive protein that promotes neural activity was inserted into a subset of spinal neurons.
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Bigger Brains Could Help Us See Better

Bigger Brains Could Help Us See Better | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers discover increased brain size in areas such as the visual cortex are an essential element of evolution.
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Not as random as thought: Modeling how neurons work together to perform complex movements

Not as random as thought: Modeling how neurons work together to perform complex movements | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

In a bid to better understand the brain and also to create robotics limbs that behave more realistically, a team of three European universities has developed a highly accurate new model of how neurons behave when performing complex movements.


The results from the University of CambridgeUniversity of Oxford, and the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) are published in the June 18 edition of the journal Neuron.


The new theory was inspired by recent experiments carried out at Stanford University, which had uncovered some key aspects of the signals that neurons emit before, during, and after a movement. “There is a remarkable synergy in the activity recorded simultaneously in hundreds of neurons,” said Guillaume Hennequin, PhD, of EPFL’s Department of Engineering, who led the research. “In contrast, previous models of cortical circuit dynamics predict a lot of redundancy, and therefore poorly explain what happens in the motor cortex during movements.”


I addition to helping us better understand the brain, better models of how neurons behave will aid in designing prosthetic limbs controlled via electrodes implanted in the brain. “Our theory could provide a more accurate guess of how neurons would want to signal both movement intention and execution to the robotic limb,” said Hennequin.


References:


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Unlocking The Brain: Are We Entering A Golden Age Of Neuroscience?

Unlocking The Brain: Are We Entering A Golden Age Of Neuroscience? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Brain science is entering what some researchers say may be a golden age, gaining important new insights into the workings of the brain -- even as brain disorders, from autism to Alzheimer's to mental illness -- are increasingly recognized as a...


Via Sharrock, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Sharrock's curator insight, June 22, 2014 9:34 AM
“This is an exciting time to be a neuroscientist. I’m not sure there’s ever been a more exciting time,” Larry Swanson, president of the Society for Neuroscience, told an audience last fall at the society’s annual conference of about 30,000 scientists. “Scientists are advancing the field in ways that we actually couldn’t even imagine say five, 10 years ago, and this is reflected in the tremendous attention that’s being paid to neuroscience not only in the White House and the European Union but really literally around the globe,” he said.
Mlik Sahib's curator insight, June 24, 2014 12:32 AM

“I think we’re literally on the cusp of a complete revolution both in how we understand the brain and how we treat brain disorders.”

– Neurosurgeon Emad Eskandar
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Research gives unprecedented 3-D view of important brain receptor

Research gives unprecedented 3-D view of important brain receptor | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers with Oregon Health & Science University's Vollum Institute have given science a new and unprecedented 3-D view of one of the most important receptors in the brain—a receptor that allows us to learn and remember, and whose dysfunction is...
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New insights could help in battle to beat Parkinson’s disease

New insights could help in battle to beat Parkinson’s disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists have taken a step closer to understanding the causes of Parkinson’s disease, identifying what’s happening at a cellular level to potentially help develop future treatments.
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Researchers explore the genetic underpinnings of nerve-cell spacing

Researchers explore the genetic underpinnings of nerve-cell spacing | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The functional organization of the central nervous system depends upon a precise architecture and connectivity of distinct types of neurons.
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12 talks on understanding the brain | TED Blog

12 talks on understanding the brain | TED Blog | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Read Montague is interested in the human dopamine system -- or, as he puts it in this illuminating talk from TEDGlobal 2012, that which makes us "chase sex, food and salt" and therefore survive Specifically, Montague and his team at the Roanoke Brain Study are interested in how dopamine and valuation systems work when two human beings interact with each other."


Via Maggie Rouman, João Sodré
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Maggie Rouman's curator insight, November 26, 2013 4:17 PM

Great videos and insights about how our brains work...

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, November 26, 2013 4:46 PM

Suggested by Maggie Roumain a colleague and former student who I trust as a source of information on brain research! 

Randy Bauer's curator insight, December 17, 2013 10:34 AM

A great resource of research that involves How Our Brain Works from TED Talks.

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Self-rated and performance-based empathy in schizophrenia: The impact of cognitive deficits

Self-rated and performance-based empathy in schizophrenia: The impact of cognitive deficits | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

People may be much less empathic than they think they are. It is not clear whether patients with schizophrenia who have impaired empathic abilities also exhibit diminished ability to accurately appraise their own such skills.


The present study aimed to examine:

(a) the accuracy of self-appraisal of empathy and

(b) the impact of specific cognitive functions on both self-rated and performance-based empathy in schizophrenia patients and healthy volunteers.


Self-reported empathy and performance-based empathy were assessed in 52 chronic patients with schizophrenia and 45 matched healthy participants with the empathy quotient and the empathy score in the Faux Pas test, respectively. Neuropsychological functioning and symptom severity were also assessed. No significant correlations between self-reported and performance-based empathy scores were found in patients, whereas these correlations were significant and positive in the control group, with the exception of Faux Pas recognition. Cognitive deficits, specifically in processing speed and theory of mind, negatively affected performance-based but not self-rated empathy in schizophrenia. Patients with less negative and more positive symptoms and lower set shifting ability reported higher empathic abilities. Self-reported empathy and empathic abilities do not show a simple relationship.


Our findings highlight a double deficit related to empathic responding in schizophrenia: diminished performance associated with cognitive deficits and inaccurate self-appraisal of empathic abilities.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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The Neuroscience of Mindfulness & Anxiety | Mindfulness, MD

The Neuroscience of Mindfulness & Anxiety | Mindfulness, MD | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
“The human brain has 100 billion neurons, each neuron connected to 10 thousand other neurons. Sitting on your shoulders is the most complicated object in the known universe.” ~ Michio Kaku. When we were young, our ...

Via Emre Erdogan
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New study reveals complex speech networks in the brain - Imperial College London

New study reveals complex speech networks in the brain - Imperial College London | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New study reveals complex speech networks in the brain
Imperial College London
Reference: 'Overlapping Networks Engaged during Spoken Language Production and its Cognitive Control', Journal of Neuroscience, Fatemeh Geranmayeh, Richard J.S.
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The Truth About Hugs, Oxytocin, and Mental Illness - Blogcritics.org (blog)

If we are to believe all the widespread wisdom, oxytocin (a nonapeptide hormone best known for its role in lactation and parturition) is the way to...

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The social psychology of nerve cells

The social psychology of nerve cells | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Cholinergic amacrine cells create a 'personal space' in much the same way that people distance themselves from one another in an elevator, researchers have discovered.
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Study Shows How Brain Tumor Cells Move and Damage Tissue

Study Shows How Brain Tumor Cells Move and Damage Tissue | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers shed new light on how glioma cells migrate in the brain and cause tumors.
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Website: Inbal Ben-Ami Bartal

Website: Inbal Ben-Ami Bartal | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Website of Inbal Ben-Ami Bartal, a postdoctoral researcher at the university of Chicago studying the Neurobiology of empathy and pro-social behavior.


Empathy, the recognition and sharing of emotional states between individuals, is a powerful motivator of pro-social behavior. The field of social neuroscience has been shedding light on the biological mechanisms that drive the empathic experience.


In humans, empathy for the pain of others is correlated with activation of a shared neural network for processing the pain for self and other.


This network, refered to as the affective pain matrix, includes areas in the limbic system as well as the Anterior Cingulate Cortex, the Insula, and frontal areas. These circuits interact with hormones related to social behavior such as oxytocin and vassopressin, and the HPA axis to generate the empathic experience. These systems act together to generate an aversive response to the distress of others, and can motivate the observer to help the other in need. 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Empathy May Be Genetic

Empathy May Be Genetic | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Do you jump to help the less fortunate, cry during sad movie scenes or tweet and post the latest topics and photos that excite or move you? If yes, you may be among the 20 percent of our population that is genetically predisposed to empathy,


according to Stony Brook Univ. psychologists Arthur and Elaine Aron. In a new study published in Brain and Behavior, Aron and colleagues at the Univ. of California, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Monmouth Univ. found that Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging


(fMRI) of brains provide physical evidence that the “highly sensitive” brain responds powerfully to emotional images.




Via Edwin Rutsch
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