Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Insula and Anterior Cingulate: the ‘everything’ network or systemic neurovascular confound?

Insula and Anterior Cingulate: the ‘everything’ network or systemic neurovascular confound? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It's no secret in cognitive neuroscience that some brain regions garner more attention than others. Particularly in fMRI research, we're all too familiar with certain regions that seem to pop up in...
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#Science of #love: It really is all in the mind, say experts

#Science of #love: It really is all in the mind, say experts | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What is this thing called love? Cole Porter wasn’t the first to ask. From mystified poets to angst-ridden teens, the question of what exactly love is has troubled us since long before the master songwriter put pen to paper.

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Brain Awareness Week 2015: How Brain Research Has Progressed, And Ways You Can Enhance Cognition

Brain Awareness Week 2015: How Brain Research Has Progressed, And Ways You Can Enhance Cognition | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Our understanding of the brain has come so far in the last few decades.
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Cochlear Implants May Benefit Mind and Mood of Older People

Cochlear Implants May Benefit Mind and Mood of Older People | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Cognition, social interactions and quality of life may improve for older people with hearing loss when hearing is restored with a cochlear implant, according to a new study

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Optogenetics without the genetics

Optogenetics without the genetics | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Light can be used to activate normal, non-genetically modified neurons through the use of targeted gold nanoparticles. This new method represents a significant technological advance with potential advantages over current optogenetic methods, including possible use in the development of therapeutics.
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Alzheimer’s Treatment Using Ultrasound Completely Restores Memory

Alzheimer’s Treatment Using Ultrasound Completely Restores Memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Breakthrough Alzheimer's treatment may restore memory and clear plaques in the brain without drugs.
Jocelyn Stoller's insight:

In rodents so far

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Changes in the brain that contribute to age-related hearing loss

Changes in the brain that contribute to age-related hearing loss | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Generally, as we age, our hearing deteriorates. Around one in three people between the ages of 65 and 74 have hearing loss, increasing to 50% from the age of 75 upwards.
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Brain waves predict our risk for insomnia

Brain waves predict our risk for insomnia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
There may not yet be a cure for insomnia, but Concordia University researchers are a step closer to predicting who is most likely to suffer from it—just in time for World Sleep Day on March 13.
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Pocket-sized device could help Parkinson’s patients regain balance

Pocket-sized device could help Parkinson’s patients regain balance | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A wearable device that stimulates the sense of balance with electric “noise” could help Parkinson’s disease patients, according to Swedish scientists.

Scientists from the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy have developed a portable pocket-sized vestibular, or balance, stimulation device in a bid to improve the lives of Parkinson’s sufferers.

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Mediators propose CERN-like organization for Human Brain Project

Mediators propose CERN-like organization for Human Brain Project | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Panel recommends major changes to troubled neuroscience initiative
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Newly discovered brain pathway overturns anatomy, could solve antipsychotic mystery

Newly discovered brain pathway overturns anatomy, could solve antipsychotic mystery | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It's been 'known' for decades: Sensory, motor and cognitive signals come in from the brain's cortex and are processed in the basal ganglia. The basal ganglia then send out signals that get routed through the thalamus and back to the cortex.
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A Brain Scan And 2,401 Slices Later, A Dead Brain Is Digitized

Scientists at the San Diego-based Brain Observatory are working on digitizing thousands of human brains for all the world to see.
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Researchers Create A Simulated Mouse Brain in a Virtual Mouse Body

Researchers Create A Simulated Mouse Brain in a Virtual Mouse Body | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

scientist Marc-Oliver Gewaltig and his team at the Human Brain Project (HBP) built a model mouse brain and a model mouse body, integrating them both into a single simulation and providing a simplified but comprehensive model of how the body and the brain interact with each other. "Replicating sensory input and motor output is one of the best ways to go towards a detailed brain model analogous to the real thing," explains Gewaltig.


As computing technology improves, their goal is to build the tools and the infrastructure that will allow researchers to perform virtual experiments on mice and other virtual organisms. This virtual neurorobotics platform is just one of the collaborative interfaces being developed by the HBP. A first version of the software will be released to collaborators in April. The HBP scientists used biological data about the mouse brain collected by the Allen Brain Institute in Seattle and the Biomedical Informatics Research Network in San Diego. These data contain detailed information about the positions of the mouse brain's 75 million neurons and the connections between different regions of the brain. They integrated this information with complementary data on the shapes, sizes and connectivity of specific types of neurons collected by the Blue Brain Project in Geneva.


A simplified version of the virtual mouse brain (just 200,000 neurons) was then mapped to different parts of the mouse body, including the mouse's spinal cord, whiskers, eyes and skin. For instance, touching the mouse's whiskers activated the corresponding parts of the mouse sensory cortex. And they expect the models to improve as more data comes in and gets incorporated. For Gewaltig, building a virtual organism is an exercise in data integration. By bringing together multiple sources of data of varying detail into a single virtual model and testing this against reality, data integration provides a way of evaluating – and fostering – our own understanding of the brain. In this way, he hopes to provide a big picture of the brain by bringing together separated data sets from around the world. Gewaltig compares the exercise to the 15th century European data integration projects in geography, when scientists had to patch together known smaller scale maps. These first attempts were not to scale and were incomplete, but the resulting globes helped guide further explorations and the development of better tools for mapping the Earth, until reaching today's precision.


Read more: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu
Human Brain Project: http://www.humanbrainproject.eu
NEST simulator software : http://nest-simulator.org/
Largest neuronalnetwork simulation using NEST : http://bit.ly/173mZ5j

Open Source Data Sets:
Allen Institute for Brain Science: http://www.brain-map.org
Bioinformatics Research Network (BIRN): http://www.birncommunity.org

The Behaim Globe : 
Germanisches National Museum, http://www.gnm.de/
Department of Geodesy and Geoinformation, TU Wien, http://www.geo.tuwien.ac.at


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Neuroscience of Leadership - EnHansen Performance

Neuroscience of Leadership - EnHansen Performance | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The neuroscience of leadership is fast becoming the most topical approach to leadership development. The field of neuroleadership is helping managers lead.
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Mindfulness and Weight Loss: A Systematic Review

Mindfulness and Weight Loss:  A Systematic Review | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Objective: Mindfulness training has been incorporated increasingly into weight loss programs to facilitate dietary and physical activity changes. This systematic review of studies using mindfulness-based programs for weight loss evaluated study methodologies with the goal of determining the current evidence in support of mindfulness interventions for weight loss. Methods: Published studies of mindfulness-based interventions for weight loss were identified through systematic review including a comprehensive search of online databases. Studies were reviewed and graded according to methodological strengths and weaknesses. Results: A total of 19 studies, including 13 randomized controlled trials and 6 observational studies, evaluated the effects of mindfulness-based interventions on weight among individuals attempting weight loss. Twelve of the studies were published in peer-reviewed journals and seven were unpublished dissertations. Among the eight randomized controlled trials published in peer-reviewed journals, six documented significant weight loss among participants in the mindfulness condition, one reported no significant change, and one failed to report body mass index at program completion. None of the studies documented a relationship between changes in mindfulness and weight loss. Conclusion: Significant weight loss was documented among participants in mindfulness interventions for 13 of the 19 studies identified for review. However, studies do not clarify the degree to which changes in mindfulness are a mechanism responsible for weight loss in mindfulness interventions. Methodological weaknesses and variability across studies limit the strength of the evidence. Further research is needed to document and evaluate the psychological, behavioral, and biological mechanisms involved in the relationship between mindfulness and weight loss.


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Dr James Hawkins's curator insight, March 15, 2015 11:43 AM

It would be interesting to check how mindfulness outcomes compare with active treatment controls ... and how well any improvements are maintained at follow up

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The cognitive basis of social behavior: cognitive reflection overrides antisocial but not always prosocial motives

Abstract: Even though human social behavior has received considerable scientific attention in the last decades, its cognitive underpinnings are still poorly understood. Applying a dual-process framework to the study of social preferences, we show in two studies that individuals with a more reflective/deliberative cognitive style, as measured by scores on the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT), are more likely to make choices consistent with “mild” altruism in simple non-strategic decisions. Such choices increase social welfare by increasing the other person’s payoff at very low or no cost for the individual. The choices of less reflective individuals (i.e. those who rely more heavily on intuition), on the other hand, are more likely to be associated with either egalitarian or spiteful motives. We also identify a negative link between reflection and choices characterized by “strong” altruism, but this result holds only in Study 2. Moreover, we provide evidence that the relationship between social preferences and CRT scores is not driven by general intelligence. We discuss how our results can reconcile some previous conflicting findings on the cognitive basis of social behavior.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Rat brains point to lead's role in schizophrenia

Rats exposed to lead had a lower cell density of parvalbumin-positive neurons compared with controls.
A study of the brains of rats exposed to lead has uncovered striking similarities with what is known about the brains of human schizophrenia patients, adding compelling evidence that lead is a factor in the onset of schizophrenia.
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Brain mechanism underlying recognition of hand gestures develops even when blind

Researchers have discovered that activated brain regions of congenitally blind individuals and activated brain regions of sighted individuals share common regions when recognizing human hand gestures. They indicated that a region of the neural network that recognizes others' hand gestures is formed in the same way even without visual information.
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Sweet nanoparticles target stroke

Sweet nanoparticles target stroke | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Materials resulting from chemical bonding of glucosamine, a type of sugar, with fullerenes, kind of nanoparticles known as buckyballs, might help to reduce cell damage and inflammation occurring after stroke.
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Neurodiversity: Some Basic Terms & Definitions

New paradigms often require a bit of new language. This is certainly the case with the neurodiversity paradigm – even the word neurodiversity itself is still relatively new, dating back only to the late 1990s. I see many people – scholars, journalists,
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Dancing, Sudoku, fish and fruit – the keys to a mentally alert old age

Dancing, Sudoku, fish and fruit – the keys to a mentally alert old age | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers in Finland tested more than 1,000 people aged 60 to 77 in a long-term study that could improve treatments for Alzheimer’s and dementia

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Bioelectrical Signals Can Stunt or Grow Brain Tissue

Bioelectrical Signals Can Stunt or Grow Brain Tissue | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By tweaking the charges of brain cells, researchers alter early brain development, opening a door to healing mature brains or undoing genetic damage
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Neuroscientists successfully implant memories into sleeping mice

Neuroscientists successfully implant memories into sleeping mice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Chuck Bednar for redOrbit.com – @BednarChuck A team of French neuroscientists has effectively hacked the brains of sleeping mice, implanting false memories using electrodes to directly stimulate and record nerve cell activities, according to new...
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'Ouch zone' in the brain identified

'Ouch zone' in the brain identified | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Activity in a brain area known as the dorsal posterior insula is directly related to the intensity of pain, a brain imaging study of 17 people has found.
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Nourishing the Aging Brain | The Scientist Magazine®

Nourishing the Aging Brain | The Scientist Magazine® | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Research reveals how the brain changes as we age and hints at ways to slow the decline.


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