Social Neuroscien...
Follow
Find
4.9K views | +5 today
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Here's What Your Brain Is Doing When You Really, Really Hate Someone

Here's What Your Brain Is Doing When You Really, Really Hate Someone | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists have spotted the parts of the brain that light up when we actively hate someone. There's probably a reason why hate evolved in the first place -- and it's similar to love.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Sustain Our Earth
Scoop.it!

Science Says Lasting Relationships Come Down To 2 Basic Traits

Science Says Lasting Relationships Come Down To 2 Basic Traits | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It has to do with how people respond to their partners' "bids."

Via SustainOurEarth
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

The Enormous Complexity of Transport Along the Axon

The Enormous Complexity of Transport Along the Axon | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Some scientists consider scaffolding fibers and tubules in the neuron to be the seat of consciousness.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

3D Deep Imaging Advance Likely to Drive New Biological Insights

3D Deep Imaging Advance Likely to Drive New Biological Insights | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers develop a new, fast and inexpensive imaging technique for deep tissue immunolabelling.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Contemplative Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Neurogenesis in the Striatum of the Adult Human Brain: Cell

Neurogenesis in the Striatum of the Adult Human Brain: Cell | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Via Dave Vago
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Psychology, Sociology & Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Choirs 'synchronise heartbeats'

Choirs 'synchronise heartbeats' | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Choir singers not only harmonise their voices, they also synchronise their heartbeats, a study suggests.

 


Via VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from leapmind
Scoop.it!

Parkinson's stem cell 'breakthrough'

Parkinson's stem cell 'breakthrough' | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Researchers in Sweden claim a "breakthrough" in how stem cells could be used to treat Parkinson's disease.


Via LeapMind
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
Scoop.it!

Betting on brain research: Experts review challenges of translational neuroscience

Betting on brain research: Experts review challenges of translational neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Despite great advances in understanding how the human brain works, psychiatric conditions, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain injuries are on the rise. Progress in the development of new diagnostic and treatment approaches appears to have stalled. Experts look at the challenges associated with 'translational neuroscience,' or efforts to bring advances in the lab to the patients who need them.

Via Donald J Bolger
more...
Donald J Bolger's curator insight, November 7, 2014 12:04 PM

Review of the issues with translational neuroscience.

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Lake Forest College’s ‘Brain Awareness Week’ to address hot topics

Lake Forest College’s ‘Brain Awareness Week’ to address hot topics | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain’s effect on emotions, gambling, religion—even sex—will be explored during the 11th annual Brain Awareness Week at Lake Forest College, Nov. 10-15.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

The inside story: How the brain and skull stay together

The inside story: How the brain and skull stay together | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Think about the way our bodies are assembled during early development and ask: How do neighboring cells know that they are supposed to become a nerve or a bone cell and how do these tissues find the correct place and alignment?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

7 Good Reasons To Cry Your Eyes Out

New York Times reporter Benedict Carey referred to tears in a recent piece as “emotional perspiration.” Given that I sweat a lot and hate deodorant, I suppose it makes sense that I weep often. But I’m not going to apologize for that,...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Food, Health and Nutrition
Scoop.it!

Junk Food Craving Linked to Brain Lapse

Junk Food Craving Linked to Brain Lapse | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Reduced activity in the area that controls self-restraint can boost high-calorie cravings, study shows

 

The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex helps people control their own behavior, according to the study. Previous studies have shown that increasing activity in this part of the brain can cut cravings for unhealthy foods, but the new research found that reduced activity has the opposite effect and can lead to overindulgence in junk food.

 

"It has long been thought that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex helps to keep automatic, or knee-jerk, reactions in check," study senior author Peter Hall, from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, explained in a news release. "We discovered that when you temporarily dampen the operation of this particular part of the brain, strongly ingrained and quite universal preferences for high-calorie foods start to hijack people's thought patterns and even their eating patterns."

 

Using a form of magnetic stimulation of the brain, the researchers temporarily reduced activity in the left dorsolateral cortex of participants' brains. The study, published recently in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, revealed that the lowered activity caused greater food cravings for calorie-dense foods as well as greater intake of junk food.

 

"This is the first study to demonstrate that taking the prefrontal cortex temporarily offline results in increased snacking," study author Cassandra Lowe, doctoral student in the university's School of Public Health and Health Systems, said in a news release. The researchers concluded their findings suggest brain health should be an integral part of public health campaigns.

 

Read more here: http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20140925/junk-food-cravings-linked-to-brain-lapse

 

Read the associated research article here: 

http://journals.lww.com/psychosomaticmedicine/Fulltext/2014/09000/The_Effects_of_Continuous_Theta_Burst_Stimulation.6.aspx


Via Eric Chan Wei Chiang
more...
Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, September 30, 2014 3:06 AM

This study shows the part of the brain controlling food cravings. However, this does not mean that high high-calorie cravings are inevitable. Other study's have shown that it is possible to train our brain to prefer healthier foods http://sco.lt/5IXUzR; and our food choices can influence brain chemistry and cause depression http://sco.lt/4xwpAv


Read more scoops on the human brain here:

http://www.scoop.it/t/biotech-and-beyond/?tag=Brain

http://www.scoop.it/t/food-health-and-nutrition/?tag=Brain

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Scientists develop a brain decoder that can hear your inner thoughts

Scientists develop a brain decoder that can hear your inner thoughts | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The term "thinking out loud" could take on a whole new meaning in the light of new research from the University of California, Berkeley, where staff have a system for mapping our inner thoughts.
Jocelyn Stoller's insight:

This device does not read your subjective content. There is no "tape recording" of thought. It can tell which areas of the brain are active in response to various stimuli and which types of emotional pathways may be involved.  It has to infer what any of that means to each person.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from DNA & RNA Research
Scoop.it!

Changes in a Single Gene’s Action Can Control Addiction- and Depression-Related Behaviors

Changes in a Single Gene’s Action Can Control Addiction- and Depression-Related Behaviors | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

New DNA regulatory technique modifies the environment around a single gene to control gene expression and behavioral consequences


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Social connections matter more than wealth—and your brain knows it

Social connections matter more than wealth—and your brain knows it | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Matt Lieberman, a distinguished social psychologist and neuroscientist, basically won the lottery. This past summer, he was offered three million dollars for an academic position—one million in raw income and two to do lab research.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Patients with ALS have difficulty with verbs: Why?

Patients with ALS have difficulty with verbs: Why? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
According to many scientists the fact that ALS patients experience (in addition to severe motor deficits) greater linguistic difficulty with verbs denoting action compared to nouns denoting objects depends on their motor deficit.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Brain's response to threat silenced when we are reminded of being loved and cared for

Brain's response to threat silenced when we are reminded of being loved and cared for | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Being shown pictures of others being loved and cared for reduces the brain's response to threat, new research has found.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Modified Alzheimer's antibodies sneak through blood–brain barrier

Modified Alzheimer's antibodies sneak through blood–brain barrier | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Delivering medications to the brain could become easier, thanks to molecules that can escort drugs through the notoriously impervious sheath that separates blood vessels from neurons. In a proof-of-concept study in monkeys, biologists used the system to reduce levels of the protein amyloid-β, which accumulates in the brain plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease1.


The blood–brain barrier is a layer of cells lining the inner surface of the capillaries that feed the central nervous system. It is nature's way of protecting the delicate brain from infectious agents and toxic compounds, while letting nutrients and oxygen in and waste products out. Because the barrier strictly regulates the passage of larger molecules and often prevents drug molecules from entering the brain, it has long posed one of the most difficult challenges in developing treatments for brain disorders.


Several approaches to bypassing the barrier are being tested, including nanoparticles that are small enough to pass through the barrier's cellular membranes and deliver their payload; catheters that carry a drug directly into the brain; and ultrasound pulses that push microbubbles through the barrier. But no approach has yet found broad therapeutic application.


Neurobiologist Ryan Watts and his colleagues at the biotechnology company Genentech in South San Francisco have sought to break through the barrier by exploiting transferrin, a protein that sits on the surface of blood vessels and carries iron into the brain. The team created an antibody with two ends. One end binds loosely to transferrin and uses the protein to transport itself into the brain. And once the antibody is inside, its other end targets an enzyme called β-secretase 1 (BACE1), which produces amyloid-β. Crucially, the antibody binds more tightly to BACE1 than to transferrin, and this pulls it off the blood vessel and into the brain. It locks BACE1 shut and prevents it from making amyloid-β.


In their most recent study, published today in Science Translational Medicine1, the researchers adjusted the strength with which the antibody binds to transferrin. When they tested the drug in both mice and crab-eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis), they found that it spread throughout the animals’ brains and decreased levels of amyloid-β in their blood plasma by more than 50%. The antibody did not seem to affect the monkeys’ blood cells. It remains to be seen, however, whether the drug would mitigate the behavioural symptoms of Alzheimer's, because monkeys do not develop the disease or amyloid plaques in the way that humans do.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Psychology, Sociology & Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Science Shows Something Surprising About What Reading Poetry Does to Your Brain

Science Shows Something Surprising About What Reading Poetry Does to Your Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain actually has very different responses to poetry and prose.

Via VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
Scoop.it!

Direct brain interface between humans

Researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team's initial demonstration a year ago. In the newly published study, which involved six people, researchers were able to transmit the signals from one person's brain over the Internet and use these signals to control the hand motions of another person within a split second of sending that signal.

Via Donald J Bolger
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
Scoop.it!

The female nose always knows: Do women have more olfactory neurons?

The female nose always knows: Do women have more olfactory neurons? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Using a new method called isotropic fractionator, a group of researchers has found biological evidence that may explain the superior olfactory abilities that women have over men.

Via Donald J Bolger
more...
Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, November 7, 2014 1:36 PM

Hubby & talk about this all the time - he can't smell a thing, I swear!

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from TLP Addiction Training News.
Scoop.it!

Scientists Discover Gene That Decides Alcoholism Recovery

Scientists Discover Gene That Decides Alcoholism Recovery | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have found the genetic marker capable of foretelling whether or not the alcoholism recovery drug acamprosate will work on certain patients.

Via Tim Pope
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Oxytocin levels in blood, cerebrospinal fluid are linked, study finds

Oxytocin levels in blood, cerebrospinal fluid are linked, study finds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
For years, scientists have debated how best to assess brain levels of oxytocin, a hormone implicated in social behaviors.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

New insight into the neuroscience of choking under pressure

New insight into the neuroscience of choking under pressure | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Everyone knows the scene: a basketball player at the free throw line, bouncing the ball as he concentrates on the basket. It's a tight game, and his team needs this point.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Food, Health and Nutrition
Scoop.it!

A compound found in turmeric encourages brain repair

A compound found in turmeric encourages brain repair | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists have discovered that a common curry spice encourages the growth of neural stem cells in rats, and could help the brain heal itself.

 

New research suggests that aromatic-tumerone, a compound found in the spice turmeric, could be used to create future drugs to treat patients with neural impairment, such as sufferers of strokes and Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Scientists from the Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine at the Research Centre Juelich in Germany studied the impact that aromatic-tumerone has on neural cells by injecting the compound into the brains of rats. Scans revealed that, after being injected with the compound, the regions of the brain involved in nerve cell growth were more active. 

 

The researchers also tested the impact of the compound directly on neural stem cells, which are cells that have the ability to transform into any type of brain cell and, in theory, should be able to repair damage or disease. But in humans and other mammals this process doesn’t seem to work so well.

 

"In humans and higher developed animals their abilities do not seem to be sufficient to repair the brain but in fish and smaller animals they seem to work well,” Maria Adele Rueger, a neuroscientist who was part of the research team, told Smitha Mundasad from BBC News.

 

The turmeric compound also sped up the differentiation of the stem cells. The results are published in the journal Stem Cell Research and Therapy http://stemcellres.com/content/5/4/100

 

Read more here: http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20142909-26250.html


Via Eric Chan Wei Chiang
more...
Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, October 8, 2014 3:33 AM

My PhD research was on the bioactive properties of gingers and I find this study rather interesting. I did not work on stem cells and I focused more on the Etlingera genus but turmeric is interesting nonetheless.  http://arrow.monash.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/monash:25662

 

Read more scoops on functional foods and regenerative medicine here: 

http://www.scoop.it/t/biotech-and-beyond/?tag=Regeneration

http://www.scoop.it/t/food-health-and-nutrition/?tag=Functional+Foods

 

Susan Walker-Meere's curator insight, October 19, 2014 3:32 PM

Using ethnological knowledge, one would think that simmering it in oil like curries are prepared or making it bio-available during a fermentation process like in a kimchi, or adding to a secondary kefir ferment would make it more efficacious.