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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Improved Outcomes Using Brain SPECT-Guided Treatment Versus Treatment-as-Usual in Community Psychiatric Outpatients: A Retrospective Case-Control Study: The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical ...

Brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans indirectly show functional activity via measurement of regional cerebral blood flow. Thirty patients at a community-based psychiatric clinic underwent brain SPECT scans. Changes in scoring of before-treatment and after-treatment scans correlated well with changes in patient Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores before treatment and after treatment. Patients were retrospectively matched with controls with similar diagnoses and pretreatment GAF scores, and those who underwent SPECT-guided treatment improved significantly more than the control patients.

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Truth about Schizophrenia

Truth about Schizophrenia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Schizophrenia is perhaps the most mysterious and poorly understood mental disorder that is often misrepresented by popular media and literature. I often receive inquires from the clients who are worried that they might be developing this disorder. Frequently, they base their "self-diagnosis" on incomplete or plain wrong information received from the popular sources.

Via Velvet Martin
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Jessica James's curator insight, December 9, 2014 11:32 PM

1. This article is very resourceful for people who are dealing with someone who is schizophrenic. It lays out all the guidelines about the illness in a simple but accurate manner.

2. Everything that is said in this article correlates with the text books and websites. It talks about how the drugs are dangerous and increase your symptoms of schizophrenia. Myers (2014) says the same thing. It says that any drug that increases your dopamine level shouldn't be used when you have schizophrenia (Myers, 2014). This article also talks about the different things that can trigger schizophrenia. Myers (2014) says the same thing, that depression, stress or genetics can cause someone to suffer from schizophrenia (Myers, 2014). They also say that people that suffer from schizophrenia can get help through medications. Tartakovsky (2010) said the same thing; that the medications will help reduce hallucinations and bizarre behavior and help the patient to lead a normal life (Tartakovsky, 2010).

3. There was nothing in this article that addressed diversity. That seems to be a theme in all these articles.

4.

Myers, D. G. (2014). Exploring psychology in modules: With dsm5 update. S.l.: Worth Pub.

 

Tartakovsky, M. (2010). Illuminating 13 Myths of Schizophrenia. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 30, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/lib/illuminating-13-myths-of-schizophrenia/0002709

  

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Alive Inside: How music can help fight dementia. » Sociology Lens

Alive Inside: How music can help fight dementia. » Sociology Lens | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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Midlife Crisis: Why Middle-Aged Women Have The Highest Rate Of Depression

Midlife Crisis: Why Middle-Aged Women Have The Highest Rate Of Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Middle-aged women have the highest rate of depression in the U.S. and very few are seeking the help of mental health professional.
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Taming neural excitations: Controlling harmful signals such as those in strokes

Taming neural excitations: Controlling harmful signals such as those in strokes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What do lasers, neural networks, and spreading epidemics have in common? They share a most basic feature whereby an initial pulse can propagate through a medium – be it physical, biological or socio-economic, respectively.
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Scientists find neurons that act as a 3D compass in the brain

Scientists find neurons that act as a 3D compass in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Pilots are trained to guard against vertigo: a sudden loss of the sense of vertical direction that renders them unable to tell “up” from “down” and sometimes even leads to crashes.
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Medications for patients with first episode psychosis may not meet guidelines

Medications for patients with first episode psychosis may not meet guidelines | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Many patients with first-episode psychosis receive medications that do not comply with recommended guidelines for first-episode treatment, researchers have found.
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Wireless brain sensor could unchain neuroscience from cables

Wireless brain sensor could unchain neuroscience from cables | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In a study in the journal Neuron, scientists describe a new high data-rate, low-power wireless brain sensor.
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Taming neural excitations

Taming neural excitations | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What do lasers, neural networks, and spreading epidemics have in common? They share a most basic feature whereby an initial pulse can propagate through a medium - be it physical, biological or socio-economic, respectively.
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Blows to head damage brain’s ‘garbage truck’ and accelerate dementia

Blows to head damage brain’s ‘garbage truck’ and accelerate dementia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study out today in the Journal of Neuroscience shows that traumatic brain injury can disrupt the function of the brain’s waste removal system.
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, December 3, 2014 9:20 AM

Implications for our sports programs!

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Endogenous adenosine A3 receptor activation selectively alleviates persistent pain states

Endogenous adenosine A3 receptor activation selectively alleviates persistent pain states | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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Older people may be better learners than we think

Older people may be able to learn more from visual information than their younger counterparts, according to a study published today in the journal Current Biology.
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NCCR Affective Sciences

NCCR Affective Sciences | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The National Center of Competence in Research “Affective Sciences – Emotions in Individual Behaviour and Social Processes” (NCCR Affective Sciences) is one of the first research centres worldwide dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of emotions and their effects on human behaviour and society.

More than 100 researchers from various disciplines and universities collaborate in the NCCR Affective Sciences.

The NCCR Affective Sciences is funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) and is hosted at theUniversity of Geneva (Swiss Center for Affective Sciences).

Le Pôle en bref >>

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First micro-structure atlas of the human brain completed: October 2012

First micro-structure atlas of the human brain completed: October 2012 | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
19 October 2012 See report Here A European team of scientists have built the first atlas of white-matter microstructure in the human brain. The project’s final results have the potential to change ...
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Cognitive Psychology of Moral Intuitions by Daniel Kahneman, Cass R. Sunstein :: SSRN

Cognitive Psychology of Moral Intuitions by Daniel Kahneman, Cass R. Sunstein :: SSRN | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Abstract:     
Moral intuitions operate in much the same way as other intuitions do; what makes the moral domain so distinctive is its foundations in the emotions, beliefs, and response tendencies that define indignation. The intuitive system of cognition, System I, is typically responsible for indignation; the more reflective system, System II, may or may not provide an override. Moral dumbfounding and moral numbness are often a product of moral intuitions that people are unable to justify. An understanding of indignation helps to explain the operation of many phenomena of interest to law and politics: the outrage heuristic, the centrality of harm, the role of reference states, moral framing, and the act-omission distinction. Because of the operation of indignation, it is extremely difficult for people to achieve coherence in their moral intuitions. Legal and political institutions usually aspire to be deliberative, and to pay close attention to System II; but even in deliberative institutions, System I can make some compelling demands.

Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Images of brain after mild stroke predict future risk

Images of brain after mild stroke predict future risk | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A CT scan of the brain within 24 hours of a mild, non-disabling stroke can predict when patients will be at the highest risk of another stroke or when symptoms may worsen, according to new research published in the American Heart Association...
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'Satiety hormone' leptin links obesity to high blood pressure

'Satiety hormone' leptin links obesity to high blood pressure | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Leptin, a hormone that regulates the amount of fat stored in the body, also drives the increase in blood pressure that occurs with weight gain, according to researchers from Monash University and the University of Cambridge.
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Better detection, prevention, and pre-clinical treatment: 3 effective tools in the fight against Alzheimer’s

Better detection, prevention, and pre-clinical treatment: 3 effective tools in the fight against Alzheimer’s | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Detection, prevention, and preclinical treatment are three key areas that may make a difference in the battle to reduce the rapid rise of new Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cases every year.
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Study reveals effects on body mass index of gene linked to heavy smoking

Study reveals effects on body mass index of gene linked to heavy smoking | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A genetic variant which causes smokers to smoke more heavily has been shown to be associated with increased body mass index (BMI) – but only in those who have never smoked, according to new research led by the University of Bristol, UK and...
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The social brain: Does guessing others’ intentions make a difference when we learn?

The social brain: Does guessing others’ intentions make a difference when we learn? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People regularly engage in sophisticated ‘mentalizing’ (i.e. guessing the intentions or beliefs of others) whenever they convince, teach, deceive, and so on.
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The human eye can see 'invisible' infrared light

The human eye can see 'invisible' infrared light | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Any science textbook will tell you we can't see infrared light. Like X-rays and radio waves, infrared light waves are outside the visual spectrum. But an international team of researchers co-led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that under certain conditions, ...
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Do concussions have lingering cognitive, physical, and emotional effects?

Do concussions have lingering cognitive, physical, and emotional effects? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A study of active duty U.S. Marines who suffered a recent or previous concussion(s) examined whether persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) and lingering effects on cognitive function are due to concussion-related brain trauma or emotional...
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Happy People Aren't Always Great At Empathy

Happy People Aren't Always Great At Empathy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Perpetually happy individuals are wonderful to have around, until you experience something worth complaining about. Recent research in PLOS ONE suggests that people who are generally cheerful are not so great at reading other people's negative emotions, though what's especially interesting is that they think they're very good at it.

More from Science of Us: Grumpy People Get The Details Right

Researchers asked the participants both how happy they tended to be from day to day and how empathetic they considered themselves.


The cheerier volunteers tended to tell the researchers that they were more empathetic, too, when compared to their not-quite-so-happy study subject counterparts. Alex Fradera, in a post at the British Psychological Society's Research Digest, describes what happened next:


By Melissa Dahl 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Healthy Aging And Disease: Alzheimer's, Schizophrenia May Come From Similar Weak Spots In The Brain

Healthy Aging And Disease: Alzheimer's, Schizophrenia May Come From Similar Weak Spots In The Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study dives deeper into the link between Alzheimer's and schizophrenia, as well as the part of the brain more vulnerable to these diseases despite their major differences.
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Desire, Emotion and the Mind 2010-2014 Philosophy Department of the University of Geneva Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences

1. Summary of research plan

We commonly explain emotions by means of desires, and explain desires by means of emotions. For instance, we say things like “He admires Maria so much, he wants to spend most of his time with her” and “Sam wanted to have this book so badly, he is now overjoyed”. On the traditional belief-desire model of the mind, however, it is not clear that there is a clear distinction between desire and emotion given that the so-called category of the pro-attitudes tends to lump together many different phenomena, and among these, desires and emotions. This holds also for many philosophical and psychological accounts of the emotions in which desires and emotions are not clearly distinguished. If so, how are we to make sense of these very ordinary types of explanations in which, on the face of it, one type of mental state is appealed to in explaining another type of mental state?

In light of these problems, the present project sets itself the task of explaining why and how emotions and desires should be distinguished, and proposes an account of how the relation between them should be conceived. The hypothesised account posits not only that emotions are distinct from desires, but also that the emotions, conceived as evaluative experiences of one’s environment, explain desires – causally, ontologically and epistemically – and that this fact has important consequences for our general understanding of the mental realm.

I start (§2.1 State of research) by introducing the topic and aim of the project (§2.1a).

I first summarise the research on desire and emotion in the context of the goals pursued in the project (§2.1b), and subsequently discuss part of the debate in moral psychology relevant for the explanation of action in terms desire (§2.1c). On this basis (§2.2. Detailed research plan), I motivate and clarify the aforementioned overarching hypothesis. Because our emotions are trackers of values, they play a non-eliminable role in our psychology: they rationalise our desires (standardly conceived as triggers of action).

Next (§2.2a), I single out four challenges for the hypothesis that open up four directions for research, i.e. four distinct sub- projects.

The first concerns the very possibility of emotions constituting reason-giving states (2.2b), the second is concerned with the different ways in which emotional phenomena can be said to rationalise desires (with a particular focus on temperaments, sentiments, personality traits, etc.) (§2.2c), the third is concerned with how fruitful the proposed hypothesis is in providing a taxonomy of the pro-attitudes (§2.2d), the fourth is concerned with confronting the hypothesis and its framework with work conducted in empirical psychology (§2.2d).

The crux of the hypothesis put forward in this project is not only that emotions have, as it is often observed, a crucial regulatory role to play in our lives, but that without them we would be blind to a whole dimension of our environment, i.e. its evaluative dimension. This, if true, militates in favour of reconsidering the fundamental architecture of the mind as including emotions in addition to beliefs and desires. It is thanks to emotions that our desires and our (evaluative) beliefs get to be intelligible from a rational or normative perspective.

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