Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Touch-sensing neurons are multitaskers

Touch-sensing neurons are multitaskers | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Two types of touch information — the feel of an object and the position of an animal’s limb — have long been thought to flow into the brain via different channels and be integrated in sophisticated processing regions.
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Reading Fiction Improves Brain Connectivity and Function

Reading Fiction Improves Brain Connectivity and Function | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Reading a novel has the power to reshape your brain and improve theory of mind.
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Eva Rider's curator insight, April 14, 2015 5:17 AM

Interesting article on the positive effects of reading fiction on the brain. In an age, when we are inundated with information and escape into the worlds of imagination maybe the most effective remedy for mental overwhelm.

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Microbes Help Produce Serotonin in Gut | Caltech

Microbes Help Produce Serotonin in Gut | Caltech | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research in mice shows that certain gut bacteria help produce serotonin in the intestine—which may be a crucial step in the prevention and treatment of some diseases.
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Serotonin and the science of sex

Serotonin and the science of sex | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Some scientists say that low serotonin makes male mice mate with males and females. Others disagree. In the end, it’s not about sexual preference, but about how science works.
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Humans Recognize Emotions from Body Patterns - PsychCentral.com (blog)

Humans Recognize Emotions from Body Patterns - PsychCentral.com (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
European researchers have presented a new model on how humans recognize the emotions of others. Philosophers at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum believe humans do not deduce emotions by interpreting other people’s behavior, rather, we perceive feelings...

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ToKTutor's curator insight, April 11, 2015 12:06 PM

Title 5: Emotion awareness is a matter of perception of patterns of feeling not rational deduction from behaviour.

John Luo's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:02 AM

Pseudoscience/placebo --> forced conclusions?

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A Bayesian Model of Category-Specific Emotional Brain Responses

A Bayesian Model of Category-Specific Emotional Brain Responses | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Author Summary Neuroimaging provides a unique way of understanding the ‘emotional brain’ by identifying patterns across multiple systems that imbue each instance of emotion with its particular qualities. In this meta-analysis across 148 studies, we ask whether it is possible to identify patterns that differentiate five emotion categories—fear, anger, disgust, sadness, and happiness—in a way that is consistent across studies. Our analyses support this capability, paving the way for brain markers for emotion that can be applied prospectively in new studies and individuals. In addition, we investigate the anatomical nature of the patterns that are diagnostic of emotion categories, and find that they are distributed across many brain systems associated with diverse cognitive, perceptual, and motor functions. For example, among other systems, information diagnostic of emotion category was found in both large, multi-functional cortical networks and in the thalamus, a small region composed of functionally dedicated sub-nuclei. Thus, rather than relying on measures in single regions, capturing the distinctive qualities of different types of emotional responses will require integration of measures across multiple brain systems. Beyond this broad conclusion, our results provide a foundation for specifying the precise mix of activity across systems that differentiates one emotion category from another.

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Brain knows how to stop thinking, start learning

Brain knows how to stop thinking, start learning | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Anyone who's ever learned music probably remembers reaching a point when they just played without "thinking" about the notes.

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Penny McIntyre's curator insight, April 10, 2015 12:28 AM

Interesting research into children and learning

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New emotion recognition model: Humans perceive feelings of others via pattern recognition

New emotion recognition model: Humans perceive feelings of others via pattern recognition | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Philosophers at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have put forward a new model that explains how humans recognise the emotions of others. According to their theory, humans are capable of perceiving feelings directly via pattern recognition.
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Sudden death in epilepsy: Researchers finger possible cause

Sudden death in epilepsy: Researchers finger possible cause | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Study blames brain stem shutdown following seizure
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Thought-Controlled Genes Could Someday Help Us Heal

Thought-Controlled Genes Could Someday Help Us Heal | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People can control prosthetic limbs, computer programs and even remote-controlled helicopters with their mind, all by using brain-computer interfaces. What if we could harness this technology to control things happening inside our own body? A team of bioengineers in Switzerland has taken the first step toward this cyborglike setup by combining a brain-computer interface with a synthetic biological implant, allowing a genetic switch to be operated by brain activity. It is the world's first brain-gene interface.

The group started with a typical brain-computer interface, an electrode cap that can register subjects' brain activity and transmit signals to another electronic device. In this case, the device is an electromagnetic field generator; different types of brain activity cause the field to vary in strength. The next step, however, is totally new—the experimenters used the electromagnetic field to trigger protein production within human cells in an implant in mice.

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Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, April 18, 2015 3:49 PM

Technology may one day give patients conscious control over what happens inside of them.

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Study reveals Internet-style ‘local area networks’ in cerebral cortex of rats

Study reveals Internet-style ‘local area networks’ in cerebral cortex of rats | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers sketching out a wiring diagram for rat brains — a field known as “connectomics” — have discovered that its structure is organized like the Internet.
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No evidence that low-frequency magnetic fields accelerate development of Alzheimer’s

No evidence that low-frequency magnetic fields accelerate development of Alzheimer’s | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Low-frequency alternating magnetic fields such as those generated by overhead power lines are considered a potential health risk because epidemiological studies indicate that they may aggravate, among other things, neurodegenerative disorders such...
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Depression Isn’t What You Think It Is

Depression Isn’t What You Think It Is | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Millions of people are diagnosed with major depression, while a growing number of scientists are saying it isn’t a distinct condition. It’s part of a big shake-up in psychiatry as researchers attempt to define mental disorders by what’s going wrong in the brain rather than using checklists of symptoms.
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Signal Variability, Cognitive Performance in the Aging Human Brain

Signal Variability, Cognitive Performance in the Aging Human Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
As we age, the physical make up of our brains changes.
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Toxoplasma gondii parasite linked to generalized anxiety disorder

Toxoplasma gondii parasite linked to generalized anxiety disorder | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most common parasites in humans, affecting as much as one-third of the world’s population.
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Dodo bird verdict given new life by psychosis therapy study

Dodo bird verdict given new life by psychosis therapy study | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A study by researchers at The University of Manchester and the University of Liverpool has examined the psychological treatment of more than 300 people suffering from psychosis, showing that, whatever the therapy, it is the relationship between the...
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Social phobic interoception: effects of bodily information on anxiety ...

Social phobic interoception: effects of bodily information on anxiety ... | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It has been suggested that body-state information influences self-perception and negative thinking in social phobia [Clark, D. M., & Wells, A. (1995). A cognitive model of social phobia. In R. G. Heimberg, M.
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Sleep- and wake-dependent neuronal changes in fruit fly brains

Sleep- and wake-dependent neuronal changes in fruit fly brains | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—The difficulty of studying sleep- and wake-dependent changes in neural activity in humans has led to comparative studies using animal models.
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USING FEWER BRAIN ‘TOOLS’ MAY SPEED LEARNING

USING FEWER BRAIN ‘TOOLS’ MAY SPEED LEARNING | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Why are some people able to master a new skill quickly while others require extra time or practice? To find the answer, researchers designed a study that measured the connections between different brain regions while participants learned to play a simple game.

The researchers discovered that the neural activity in the quickest learners was different from that of the slowest. Their analysis provides new insight into what happens in the brain during the learning process and sheds light on the rol

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What can brain-controlled prosthetics tell us about the brain?

What can brain-controlled prosthetics tell us about the brain? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The ceremonial opening kick of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Sao Paolo, Brazil, which was performed–with the help of a brain-controlled exo-skeleton–by a local teen who had been paralyzed from the waste down due to a spinal cord injury, was a seminal...
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Arts And Crafts May Stave Off Memory Problems That Increase Risk For Dementia

Arts And Crafts May Stave Off Memory Problems That Increase Risk For Dementia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Mental and socially engaging activities reduced participants' risk of developing mild cognitive impairment.
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Psychedelic tea might help with depression

Psychedelic tea might help with depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Hallucinogenic tea brewed from South American plants might treat depression, according to a new study - but don't start your homebrewing just yet; it's a small study, and there are still unclear aspects about it.
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New Dementia Treatment Triggers Brain Cell Growth 

New Dementia Treatment Triggers Brain Cell Growth  | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New dementia treatment can also reduce depression and anxiety.
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Study: Near-death brain signaling accelerates demise of the heart

Study: Near-death brain signaling accelerates demise of the heart | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What happens in the moments just before death is widely believed to be a slowdown of the body’s systems as the heart stops beating and blood flow ends.
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Food for thought: Master protein enhances learning and memory

Food for thought: Master protein enhances learning and memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Just as some people seem built to run marathons and have an easier time going for miles without tiring, others are born with a knack for memorizing things, from times tables to trivia facts.
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