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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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How Does the Act of Writing Affect Your Brain?

How Does the Act of Writing Affect Your Brain? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
One of the most interesting details shared in the graphic above is the information about the Princeton University Study which demonstrated that the brain of a person telling a story and the brain a...

Via Douglas Eby, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Jasmin Rez's curator insight, April 30, 2013 5:38 PM

via @DouglasEby 

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Now is a Great Time to be Studying Human Nature | In Their Own Words | Big Think

Now is a Great Time to be Studying Human Nature | In Their Own Words | Big Think | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
I'm very optimistic that we can make breakthroughs precisely by trying to take steps in the direction of a more integrated, contextualized neuroscience of consciousness.
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Musicians who learn a new melody demonstrate enhanced skill after a night's sleep

Musicians who learn a new melody demonstrate enhanced skill after a night's sleep | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study examining how the brain learns and retains motor skills provides insight into musical skill. Musicians who practiced and learned a new melody and were tested on it again after a night's sleep showed enhanced learning, says a researcher.

Via bricoleuric, Donald J Bolger
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bricoleuric's curator insight, April 17, 2013 12:36 AM

Learning in our sleep, that's neuroplasticity at work.

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Those who choose utilitarian ethics have empathy deficit, study finds | The Raw Story

Those who choose utilitarian ethics have empathy deficit, study finds | The Raw Story | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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Blind people have better memories, says research at University of Bath

Blind people have better memories, says research at University of Bath | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
An Ancient Hebrew proverb stating that blind people are the best at remembering exactly what was said has remarkably been proven correct by scientists at a West university.

Researchers from the...
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David Eagleman - Neuroscience Laboratory for Perception and Action

David Eagleman - Neuroscience Laboratory for Perception and Action | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
David Eagleman, Laboratory for Perception and Action
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Hearing Voices: PTSD and Auditory Hallucinations--Mind the Brain

Hearing Voices: PTSD and Auditory Hallucinations--Mind the Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

One of the greatest benefits of being affiliated with a major university is the opportunities that often arise to engage in interdisciplinary collaboration.  I was invited, by Composer and researcher Jonathan Berger, to present at the seventh annual Music and Brain Symposium, which was held earlier this month at Stanford University.  Jonathan is the Denning Family Provostial Professor in Music at Stanford, and is co-director of the Stanford Institute for Creativity and the Arts (SICA) and The Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics(CCRMA). 


This year’s symposium was titled, “Hearing Voices,” and brought together an interdisciplinary panel (from the fields of music, psychology, anthropology, medical humanities and psychiatry) of researchers, scholars, and writers to examine the phenomena of auditory hallucinations.

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Paracetamol Can Soften Our Moral Reactions | Practical Ethics

Paracetamol Can Soften Our Moral Reactions | Practical Ethics | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Our moral reactions are easily influenced by a variety of factors. One of them is anxiety. When people are confronted with disturbing experiences like
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Social Bonding in Prairie Voles Helps Guide Search for Autism Treatments | Emory University | Atlanta, GA

Social Bonding in Prairie Voles Helps Guide Search for Autism Treatments | Emory University | Atlanta, GA | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Center for Translational Social Neuroscience (CTSN) at Emory University are focusing on prairie voles as a new model to screen the effectiveness of drugs to treat autism.
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The Enormous Promise of Psychedelics for Sustaining Health, Happiness and Sanity

The Enormous Promise of Psychedelics for Sustaining Health, Happiness and Sanity | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Inside this year's conference for the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Science.
Jocelyn Stoller's insight:

Some research shows that MDMA can damage serotonin pathways and lead to long-lasting mood disorders, but the research and finetuning should continue in an even-handed, openminded manner.

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Mental puzzles underlie music’s delight | Body & Brain | Science News

ENLARGE
SOUNDS GOOD
Listening to new music sparks activity in brain regions that analyze sound (green), recognize patterns (blue), process emotions (red), and determine rewards (rainbow, at bottom). Activity in the nucleus accumbens (rainbow) could predict how much money people were willing to spend on a new song. This person (brain image shown) wanted to pay the maximum amount — $2 — for a song.
Courtesy of V. Salimpoor
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Neuron - Innate Immunity in the CNS: Redefining the Relationship between the CNS and Its Environment


Via Donald J Bolger
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Science of Happiness

Researchers at UC Berkeley are doing a wide range of studies exploring positive emotions and happiness. Experiments on the brain, nervous system, hormones, h...

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Stanford study says MRI scans can predict outcome of math tutoring - San Jose Mercury News

Stanford study says MRI scans can predict outcome of math tutoring - San Jose Mercury News | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scope Stanford study says MRI scans can predict outcome of math tutoring San Jose Mercury News The researchers' most surprising finding was that children's IQ and math scores had no effect on tutoring outcomes, yet brain scan images "predicted how...
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Dynamic Neural Network of Insight: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study on Solving Chinese ‘Chengyu’ Riddles

The key components of insight include breaking mental sets and forming the novel, task-related associations. The majority of researchers have agreed that the anterior cingulate cortex may mediate processes of breaking one’s mental set, while the exact neural correlates of forming novel associations are still debatable.

In the present study, we used a paradigm of answer selection to explore brain activations of insight by using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging during solving Chinese ‘chengyu’ (in Chinese pinyin) riddles. Based on the participant’s choice, the trials were classified into the insight and non-insight conditions. Both stimulus-locked and response-locked analyses are conducted to detect the neural activity corresponding to the early and late periods of insight solution, respectively.


Our data indicate that the early period of insight solution shows more activation in the middle temporal gyrus, the middle frontal gyrus and the anterior cingulate cortex. These activities might be associated to the extensive semantic processing, as well as detecting and resolving cognitive conflicts. In contrast, the late period of insight solution produced increased activities in the hippocampus and the amygdala, possibly reflecting the forming of novel association and the concomitant “Aha” feeling. Our study supports the key role of hippocampus in forming novel associations, and indicates a dynamic neural network during insight solution.

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(De)Localizing Social Neuroscience: Reconstituting the Social Brain within a Social World

Cognitive neuroscience has become one of the most cutting-edge fields in technoscience across the globe. Now entering an exciting era is a sub-discipline known as social cognitive neuroscience (SCN), or the biologically grounded complement of social and cognitive psychology focused on the neural basis of human thought and social behavior.


Combining ethnographic fieldwork with concepts that have risen out of previous studies in the cultural anthropology of science and technology, this case study of the Social Cognition Laboratory (SCL) examines the everyday space, practices, and individuals that give rise to the contemporary world of SCN.


By rendering science and technology cultural activities that may be critiqued through an anthropological lens, I orient SCN as a scientific subculture that is simultaneously encultured. This exercise in the demystification of this dominating and popularly imagined discipline seeks to accomplish two goals. First, I illustrate the nuances inherent to this emergent field of “hard” technoscience, which seeks to shed light on aspects of the social world that have been historically subject to investigation by the social sciences and humanities. Second, I challenge prevailing, computer-based epistemologies of self and world produced by concepts and research in SCN. Addressing how these understandings are historically constituted, culturally constructed, and inherently fluid is critical in so far as brain-based notions of personhood continue to guide modern conceptions of self and the social world.

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The Brain on Trial - David Eagleman - The Atlantic

The Brain on Trial - David Eagleman - The Atlantic | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The Atlantic covers breaking news, analysis, opinion around politics, business, culture, international, science, technology, national profiles on the official site of the Atlantic Magazine.
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Sleepy brain waves predict dream recall

THE patterns of brain waves that occur during sleep can predict the likelihood that dreams will be successfully recalled upon waking up, according to a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience.
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Pain: Brain doesn't differentiate between emotional, physical pain

Like a jab in the arm with a red-hot poker, social rejection hurts. Literally. A new study finds that our brains make little distinction between the sting of being rebuffed by peers -- or by a...
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New Biological Pathway Identified for PTSD | Emory University | Atlanta, GA

High blood levels of a hormone produced in response to stress are linked to post-traumatic stress disorder in women but not men, a study from researchers at Emory University and the University of Vermont has found.
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What the best jazz musicians and business brains have in common

What the best jazz musicians and business brains have in common | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
How do you cope when faced with complexity and constant change at work? Successful leaders do what jazz musicians do: they improvise.

Via Maya Mathias, David Hain, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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John Michel's curator insight, March 14, 2013 7:32 AM

(CNN) -- How do you cope when faced with complexity and constant change at work? Successful leaders do what jazz musicians do: they improvise.

They invent novel responses and take calculated risks without a scripted plan or a safety net. They negotiate with each other as they proceed, and they don't dwell on mistakes or stifle each other's ideas.

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John Michel, experienced leader, humanitarian, visioneer, and renown status quo buster, is the author of the ground breaking book, Mediocre Me: How Saying No to the Status Quo will Propel you from Ordinary to Extraordinary. Check out his blog at www.MediocreMe.com or drop him a note at johnmichel@MediocreMe.com


Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, March 14, 2013 6:52 PM

Improv.  The art of teaching, as well.  

 

" To foster innovation, leaders hedge against the trap of "too much consensus." The underlying assumption is that when people disagree, they're both right. Thus, such organizations tolerate and encourage dissent and debate."



Ariana Amorim's curator insight, March 15, 2013 12:34 PM

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

Talents of best jazz musicians are applicable to business people

The best in their field need to be expert improvisers

Balancing free expression and rules is another important skill

'Hit a groove' and work in teams to get the best from individuals

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Psychopathic Brains Display Neuronal Difficulties Processing Empathy: A Study

Psychopathic Brains Display Neuronal Difficulties Processing Empathy: A Study | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
As any fan of the TV series “Sherlock” or “Dexter” knows, a lack of empathy is a hallmark of psychopathy. However, as researchers Jean Decety, Laurie R. Skelly and Kent A.
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