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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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ACP Hospitalist, March 2013 - New research links empathy to patient outcomes

ACP Hospitalist, March 2013 - New research links empathy to patient outcomes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
RT @acpinternist: New research links empathy to patient outcomes http://t.co/MAjFhfLryz
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Reward linked to image is enough to activate brain's visual cortex – KU Leuven

Reward linked to image is enough to activate brain's visual cortex – KU Leuven | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Once rhesus monkeys learn to associate a picture with a reward, the reward by itself becomes enough to alter the activity in the monkeys' visual cortex.
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Backwards signals appear to sensitize brain cells, rat study shows

Backwards signals appear to sensitize brain cells, rat study shows | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Backwards signals appear to sensitize brain cells, rat study shows
Jocelyn Stoller's insight:
During waking hours, electrical signals travel from dendrites—antenna-like projections at one end of the cell-- through the cell body. From the cell body, they then travel the length of the axon, a single long projection at the other end of the cell. This electrical signal stimulates the release of chemicals at the end of the axon, which bind to dendrites on adjacent cells, stimulating these recipient cells to fire electrical signals, and so on. When groups of cells repeatedly fire in this way, the electrical signals increase in intensity. Dr. Bukalo and her team examined electrical signals that traveled in reverse―from the cell’s axon, to the cell body, and out its many dendrites. The reverse firing, depicted in this diagram, happens during sleep and at rest, appearing to reset the cell and priming it to learn new information.
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Feeling Connected Makes Us Kind

Feeling Connected Makes Us Kind | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A recent study suggests that our social connections inspire altruism.
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Frontiers | The interactive brain hypothesis | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Frontiers | The interactive brain hypothesis | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Frontiers | The interactive brain hypothesis | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience publishes articles on the most outstanding discoveries across the research spectrum of Frontiers | The interactive brain hypothesis | Human Neuroscience.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Story and Narrative
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Presentation Zen: Neurochemistry, empathy & the power of story

Presentation Zen: Neurochemistry, empathy & the power of story | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"But the video I'd like to highlight today concerns the role of neurochemistry and story. Have you ever wondered what is happening to you at the neurochemical level when a story gets your full attention, brings you in, and then causes you to care deeply about its contents? If so, this video below should be of interest."


Via Gregg Morris
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Insight Narrator's comment, April 15, 2013 7:17 AM
A challenging video to watch at the start, but demonstrates the power of 'conflict' in a story structure and its importance in catching attention and creating an emotional response that changes the chemistry in the brain. Illustrates the importance of generating empathy, or making people care, when it comes to persuading them towards certain behaviours.
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Brain's Visual Cortex Activates For Reward Even When Stimulus Is Removed - RedOrbit

Brain's Visual Cortex Activates For Reward Even When Stimulus Is Removed - RedOrbit | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
RedOrbit
Brain's Visual Cortex Activates For Reward Even When Stimulus Is Removed
RedOrbit
“Dopamine's role in reward signaling is the reason some Parkinson's patients fall into gambling addiction after taking dopamine-increasing drugs.
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Teamwork Builds Big Brains - ScienceNOW

Teamwork Builds Big Brains - ScienceNOW | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Teamwork Builds Big Brains - ScienceNOW

Via VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG
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Prosocial Behavior: Why Do People Help?

Reading: Social Psychology- Why do we #help people? http://t.co/4naeRCkHMo
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Mind and Brain
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A Laser Light Show in the Brain: What Optogenetics Means for Neuroscience

A Laser Light Show in the Brain: What Optogenetics Means for Neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By shining lasers through optical fibres aimed at particular populations of neurons at specific times, investigators can now effectively direct symphonies of light-induced neural activity inside the brain.

Via Jone Johnson Lewis
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Uplifting music can boost mental capacity, research finds

Uplifting music can boost mental capacity, research finds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—Uplifting concertos from Vivaldi's The Four Seasons can boost mental alertness, according to research from Northumbria University.
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Face the facts: Neural integration transforms unconscious face detection into conscious face perception

Face the facts: Neural integration transforms unconscious face detection into conscious face perception | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—The apparent ease and immediacy of human perception is deceptive, requiring highly complex neural operations to determine the category of objects in a visual scene.
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Does studying science make you a better person?

Does studying science make you a better person? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study suggests that scientists are more likely to have a strong moral compass than those outside the field
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‘Brain waves’ challenge area-specific view of brain activity – KU Leuven

‘Brain waves’ challenge area-specific view of brain activity – KU Leuven | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Our understanding of brain activity has traditionally been linked to brain areas – when we speak, the speech area of the brain is active.
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Game of Japanese chess reveals how experts develop their capacity for rapid problem-solving

Game of Japanese chess reveals how experts develop their capacity for rapid problem-solving | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—The superior capability of experts to rapidly solve problems depends largely on their intuition, and it has long been known that this is related to experience and training.
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Does Our Short Attention Span Prevent Us From Deep Thinking?

Does Our Short Attention Span Prevent Us From Deep Thinking? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In his recent essay in Harvard Business Review, Umair Haque critiques “TED thinking,” which he writes, serves as a shorthand for the way we've come to think
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Frontiers | The role of prediction in social neuroscience | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Frontiers | The role of prediction in social neuroscience | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Frontiers | The role of prediction in social neuroscience | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience publishes articles on the most outstanding discoveries across the research spectrum of Frontiers | The role of prediction in social neuroscience | Human...
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Talking to Yourself Can Give You a Temporary Cognitive Boost

Talking to Yourself Can Give You a Temporary Cognitive Boost | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Talking to yourself has long been frowned upon as a sign of craziness, but a recent study published in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology suggests talking to yourself might actually help you find lost or hidden objects more quickly...
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Lecturers dig into creative process across disciplines - Brown Daily Herald

Lecturers dig into creative process across disciplines - Brown Daily Herald | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The Creative Mind Lecture Series will plot new directions for art and design.
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Brain spikes: Synchrony may be key to cracking brain's neural code

Brain spikes: Synchrony may be key to cracking brain's neural code | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Biomedical engineers have detailed research progress toward “reading and writing the neural code.” The neural code details how the brain’s roughly 100 billion neurons turn raw sensory inputs into information we can use to see,...
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From Sleep Study, Clues to Happiness - New York Times (blog)

From Sleep Study, Clues to Happiness - New York Times (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New York Times (blog) From Sleep Study, Clues to Happiness New York Times (blog) A little over a decade ago, scientists discovered that narcolepsy, the neurological disorder that leads to episodes of irresistible sleepiness, is caused by the loss...
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Meditation appears to produce enduring changes in emotional processing in the brain - Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

A new study has found that participating in an 8-week meditation training program can have measurable effects on how the brain functions even when someone is not actively meditating.
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Study participants who completed an 8-week meditation training course had reduced activity in the right amygdala (highlighted structure) in response to emotional images, even when not meditating. (Gaëlle Desbordes, PhD, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Mass. General Hospital)

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Mental picture of others can be seen using fMRI, new study finds

Mental picture of others can be seen using fMRI, new study finds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It is possible to tell who a person is thinking about by analyzing images of his or her brain.
Jocelyn Stoller's insight:

Our mental models of people produce unique patterns of brain activation, which can be detected using advanced imaging techniques according to a study by Cornell University neuroscientist Nathan Spreng and his colleagues. "When we looked at our data, we were shocked that we could successfully decode who our participants were thinking about based on their brain activity," said Spreng, assistant professor of human development in Cornell's College of Human Ecology. Understanding and predicting the behavior of others is a key to successfully navigating the social world, yet little is known about how the brain actually models the enduring personality traits that may drive others' behavior, the authors say. Such ability allows us to anticipate how someone will act in a situation that may not have happened before.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-mental-picture-fmri.html#jCp

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Just another pretty face: Professor investigates neural basis of prosopagnosia

Just another pretty face: Professor investigates neural basis of prosopagnosia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
For Bradley Duchaine, there is definitely more than meets the eye where faces are concerned.
Jocelyn Stoller's insight:

These are examples of famous faces and non-famous faces used in Bradley Duchaine’s prosopagnosia experiment. Paired famous and non-famous faces are shown in corresponding positions. Credit: Bradley Duchaine 

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-02-pretty-professor-neural-basis-prosopagnosia.html#jCp

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