Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Helping Others at Work Makes People Happier | Lab Manager Magazine®

Helping Others at Work Makes People Happier | Lab Manager Magazine® | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Altruists in the workplace are more likely to help fellow employees, be more committed to their work and be less likely to quit, new research by UW-Madison's La Follette School of Public Affairs shows.
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Reading literary fiction improves 'mind-reading' skills, research shows

Reading literary fiction improves 'mind-reading' skills, research shows | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Heated debates about the quantifiable value of arts and literature are a common feature of American social discourse.
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Scientist Interview: Implanted Electrodes Reboot Brain Out of Intractable Depression

Scientist Interview: Implanted Electrodes Reboot Brain Out of Intractable Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Psychological depression is more than an emotional state. Good evidence for that comes from emerging new uses for a  technology already widely prescribed for Parkinson's patients. ...
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“Early to bed, early to rise”: Diffusion tensor imaging identifies chronotype-specificity

“Early to bed, early to rise”: Diffusion tensor imaging identifies chronotype-specificity | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Sleep and wakefulness are crucial prerequisites for cognitive efficiency, the disturbances of which severely impact performance and mood as present e.g. after time zone traveling, in shift workers or patients with sleep or affective disorders. Based on their individual disposition to sleep and wakefulness, humans can be categorized as early (EC), late (LC) or intermediate (IC) chronotypes. While ECs tend to wake up early in the morning and find it difficult to remain awake beyond their usual bedtime, LCs go to bed late and have difficulties getting up. Beyond sleep/wake timings, chronotypes show distinct patterns of cognitive performance, gene expression, endocrinology and lifestyle. However, little is known about brain structural characteristics potentially underlying differences. Specifically, white matter (WM) integrity is crucial for intact brain function and has been related to various lifestyle habits, suggesting differences between chronotypes. Hence, the present study draws on Diffusion Tensor Imaging as a powerful tool to non-invasively probe WM architecture in 16 ECs, 23 LCs and 20 ICs. Track-based spatial statistics highlight that LCs were characterized by WM differences in the frontal and temporal lobes, cingulate gyrus and corpus callosum. Results are discussed in terms of findings reporting late chronotypes to exhibit a chronic form of jet lag accompanied with sleep disturbances, vulnerability to depression and higher consumption of nicotine and alcohol. This study has far-reaching implications for health and the economy. Ideally, work schedules should fit in with chronotype-specificity whenever possible.

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Power of precision medicine shown in successful treatment of patient with disabling OCD

Power of precision medicine shown in successful treatment of patient with disabling OCD | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A multidisciplinary team led by a geneticist and psychiatrist from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's (CSHL) Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics today publish a paper providing a glimpse of both the tremendous power and the current limitations of...
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Pheromones: Tears For Fears Is Not Just A Bad 1980s Band

Nocturnal animals use their noses to stay alive.
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Assistant Professor Loui Studies Music Perception, Cognition - Wesleyan Connection (blog)

Assistant Professor Loui Studies Music Perception, Cognition - Wesleyan Connection (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Wesleyan Connection (blog)
Assistant Professor Loui Studies Music Perception, Cognition
Wesleyan Connection (blog)
In Psyche Loui's “Cognitive Neuroscience” course, students learn how the brain enables the mind.
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Tears for Fears: Juvenile Mice Secrete a Protective Pheromone in Their Tears ... - Science Daily (press release)

Tears for Fears: Juvenile Mice Secrete a Protective Pheromone in Their Tears ... - Science Daily (press release) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
LiveScience.com
Tears for Fears: Juvenile Mice Secrete a Protective Pheromone in Their Tears ...
Science Daily (press release)
In mice, social behaviors are also driven by these chemical signals, called pheromones.
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Where Are Positive Memories Stored? New Research Probes The Relationship Between Mind And Brain

Where Are Positive Memories Stored? New Research Probes The Relationship Between Mind And Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain can recognize favorable learning and designate positive memories, a new study suggests.
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New MRI technique can detect genetic condition that attacks the heart, brain and nerves

New MRI technique can detect genetic condition that attacks the heart, brain and nerves | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A genetic condition that attacks multiple organs and usually results in fatal heart problems can be detected using a new MRI technique that was developed at the University of Alberta.
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Does the brain rely on computer-like mechanism to make sense of novel situations? | Machines Like Us

Does the brain rely on computer-like mechanism to make sense of novel situations? | Machines Like Us | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Our brains give us the remarkable ability to make sense of situations we've never encountered before—a familiar person in an unfamiliar place, for example, or a coworker in a different job role—but the mechanism our brains use to accomplish this has...

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Critical tool for brain research derived from 'pond scum'

Critical tool for brain research derived from 'pond scum' | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The poster child for basic research might well be a one-celled green algae found in ordinary lakes and ponds.
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DNA nanotechnology opens new path to super-high-resolution molecular imaging : Wyss Institute at Harvard

DNA nanotechnology opens new path to super-high-resolution molecular imaging : Wyss Institute at Harvard | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Wyss Institute at Harvard


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MindCrowd: Leveraging Genetics to Advance Alzheimer's Research

MindCrowd: Leveraging Genetics to Advance Alzheimer's Research | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Take the ten minute test, immediately see your results, and then post it to your social network. You can help make a difference. (Take a ten min memory test to power innovative Alzheimer's research-you may be surprised by your results!
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Critical tool for brain research derived from 'pond scum'

Critical tool for brain research derived from 'pond scum' | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The poster child for basic research might well be a one-celled green algae found in ordinary lakes and ponds.
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Measuring Humility and Its Positive Effects

Measuring Humility and Its Positive Effects | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Over a decade ago, the positive psychology movement encouraged the discipline to examine the possibility that it had focused too much on problem-focused stories and research questions, while ignoring the positive ...
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How hugging can lower your blood pressure and boost your memory

How hugging can lower your blood pressure and boost your memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Hugging a loved one isn't just a great way to bond - it has several physical benefits as well, according to researchers at the University of Vienna.

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Study reveals information about the genetic architecture of brain's grey matter

Study reveals information about the genetic architecture of brain's grey matter | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
An international research team studying the structure and organization of the brain has found that different genetic factors may affect the thickness of different parts of the cortex of the brain.
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Compound That Reduces Risk of Stroke Identified - Drug Discovery & Development

Compound That Reduces Risk of Stroke Identified - Drug Discovery & Development | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Compound That Reduces Risk of Stroke Identified Drug Discovery & Development A subsequent inflammatory response brings key immune system cells into the space, where they secrete the neurotransmitter glutamate outside of the blood vessels where it...
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Revolutionary brain scanning clinical research centre opens at the Rosie - Cambridge News

Revolutionary brain scanning clinical research centre opens at the Rosie - Cambridge News | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Revolutionary brain scanning clinical research centre opens at the Rosie
Cambridge News
A revolutionary clinical research centre at a Cambridge hospital has welcomed its first baby for brain scans.
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Why Do We Change Our Voice's Pitch When Talking To A Romantic Interest? It Makes The Love Connection

Why Do We Change Our Voice's Pitch When Talking To A Romantic Interest? It Makes The Love Connection | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Could you tell the difference between someone who is on the phone with a love interest as opposed to a friend? It's surprisingly easy, because we all change our voice when talking to someone we're interested in.
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The Science of Compassion: Dr. James Doty at TEDxUNPlaza 2013

James R. Doty, M.D. is the founder and director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University of which His Holiness the Dalai Lama is the founding benefactor. He collaborates with scientists from a number of disciplines examining the moral, social and neural bases for compassion and altruism.


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New Study: Social Media, Personality Type, & Self Expression

New Study: Social Media, Personality Type, & Self Expression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The word cloud featured represents those  "words most commonly used by women ... In a study published last week at PLOS ONE, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania examined the language used in 75,000 Facebook profiles. They found differences across ages, genders, and certain personality traits. This allowed the group, led by computer and information scientist H. Andrew Schwartz, to make predictions about the profile of each user.


The researchers found that they could predict a user’s gender with 92 percent accuracy. They could also guess a user’s age within three years more than half of the time.

To date, this is the largest study of its kind. Its magnitude allowed the researchers to use an “open-vocabulary approach”—that is, they let the data drive which words or phrases were considered most important. Most studies rely on a closed-vocabulary approach, using previously established lists of related words. That technique forces researchers to look at trait markers they already know, rather than discover new ones.

“Automatically clustering words into coherent topics allows one to potentially discover categories that might not have been anticipated,” the authors wrote. “[Open vocabulary approaches] consider all words encountered and thus are able to adapt well to the evolving language in social media or other genres.”

The group was particularly interested in using this approach to determine users’ characteristics. Each participant filled out a questionnaire, scoring themselves on the “Big Five” personality traits: extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness. The researchers then looked at the profile updates for language that aligned with the participants’ test scores, clumping common words and phrases into word clouds. (Some of this data is publicly available at The World Well-Being Project.)

Some of the language was consistent with previous psychological findings. For example, extroverts were far more likely than introverts to use the word “party,” and neurotic people were more likely to use the word “depressed.”

But other discoveries were more novel. Introverts were more likely to talk about Japanese media like “anime” and “manga,” and people who were less neurotic mentioned social events like “vacation,” “church,” and “sports” more often. Users who scored as less open were more likely to use shorthands like “2day” or “ur.”

The researchers hope to use their findings to provide more insight into what behavior sets different types of people apart.

“When I ask myself,” co-author Martin Seligman said in a press release, “ ‘What’s it like to be an extrovert?’ ‘What’s it like to be a teenage girl?’ ‘What’s it like to be schizophrenic or neurotic?’ or ‘What’s it like to be 70 years old?’ these word clouds come much closer to the heart of the matter than do all the questionnaires in existence.”"

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Ali Patterson's curator insight, October 2, 2013 2:55 PM

Word clouds prove frighteningly predictive of variables including age, gender, and intro/extroversion.

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The Biology and Psychology of Ethical Behavior

Is morality culturally determined and relative, an evolved social contract that is absolute, or something else?
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