Social Neuroscience Advances
5.9K views | +0 today
Follow
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

UNL study links social anxiety to a gene : Lincoln, NE Journal Star

UNL study links social anxiety to a gene : Lincoln, NE Journal Star | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A person’s willingness to help others may be influenced by a gene that also affects social anxiety, says a study led by a University of Nebraska-Lincoln scientist.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Chemist devises optical imaging technique to unlock the mystery of memory

Chemist devises optical imaging technique to unlock the mystery of memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —In the search to understand memory, Wei Min is looking at cells at the most basic level, long before the formation of neurons and synapses.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

» The Anatomy of an Argument: When Emotions Take the Wheel - Parenting Tips

» The Anatomy of an Argument: When Emotions Take the Wheel - Parenting Tips | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
How destructive emotions threaten good relationships if partners do not understand fight/flight response and what healthy families can do about it.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empaths
Scoop.it!

15 Tips For Empaths and Highly Sensitive People

15 Tips For Empaths and Highly Sensitive People | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Empathic ability allows you to read and understand people’s energy. This ability may be genetic, passing from generation to generation. You may share this ability with a relative, so look at your family tree; does anyone else seem to fit the description? Empaths have the ability to scan another’s energy for thoughts, feelings and possibly for past, present, and future life occurrences. Most empaths are unaware of how this really works, and have accepted that they are sensitive to other people’s energy. The ability to correctly perceive and to some extent mirror the energy of another is a challenge. This gift allows us to steer ourselves through life with added perception. You need to be selective and have coping skills in place, if not you will easily be overwhelmed.


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Center for Investigating Healthy Minds - Meditation/Compassion Training

Meditation/Compassion Training
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

The Emotional Life of Your Brain | Richard J Davidson

 Dr. Davidson’s latest book offers a new model for understanding our emotions – their origins, their power and their malleability.  He has discovered that personality is composed of six basic emotional “styles,” including resilience, self-awareness, and attention. Our emotional fingerprint results from where on the continuum of each style we fall. He explains the brain circuits that underlie each style in order to give us a new model of the emotional brain, one that will even go so far as to affect the way we treat conditions like autism and depression. And, finally, he provides strategies we can use to change our own brains and emotions-if that is what we want to do.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Anxiety: An Adaptive Emotion | InTechOpen

Anxiety: An Adaptive Emotion | InTechOpen | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Anxiety: An Adaptive Emotion | InTechOpen, Published on: 2013-03-20. Authors: Ana G. Gutiérrez-García and Carlos M. Contreras
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

The Importance of Empathy in the Therapeutic Alliance

The Importance of Empathy in the Therapeutic Alliance | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

In this investigation of the construct of empathy, the authors report that the literature reflects strong evidence that empathy is an essential component of the therapeutic alliance across theories and that empathy is necessary in the counseling process. The concept of empathy continues to be a central component of new forms of counseling and therapy.

 

**********

Rogers (1957) conceptualized and specified six conditions that he considered to be both necessary and sufficient for therapeutic client change to occur. Rogers hypothesized that these six conditions apply to all psychotherapy, not just to client-centered therapy.

 

By Feller, Candi P.; Cottone, R. Rocco


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

A. D. "Bud" Craig, PhD

A. D. "Bud" Craig, PhD | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Dr. Craig is a functional neuroanatomist interested in the representation of feelings from the body, which affects theories of emotion and consciousness.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Study Shows Couples’ Genes Could Affect Marital Bliss

Study Shows Couples’ Genes Could Affect Marital Bliss | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
NBC:
A couple’s chances for marital bliss may go beyond their ability to have and to hold.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Method of recording brain activity could lead to mind-reading devices, Stanford scientists say

Method of recording brain activity could lead to mind-reading devices, Stanford scientists say | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

A brain region activated when people are asked to perform mathematical calculations in an experimental setting is similarly activated when they use numbers -- or even imprecise quantitative terms, such as "more than" -- in everyday conversation, according to a study by Stanford University School of Medicine scientists.

 

Using a novel method, the researchers collected the first solid evidence that the pattern of brain activity seen in someone performing a mathematical exercise under experimentally controlled conditions is very similar to that observed when the person engages in quantitative thought in the course of daily life.

 

"We're now able to eavesdrop on the brain in real life," said Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences and director of Stanford's Human Intracranial Cognitive Electrophysiology Program. Parvizi is the senior author of the study, published Oct. 15, 2013 in Nature Communications. The study's lead authors are postdoctoral scholar Mohammad Dastjerdi, MD, PhD, and graduate student Muge Ozker.

 

The finding could lead to "mind-reading" applications that, for example, would allow a patient who is rendered mute by a stroke to communicate via passive thinking. Conceivably, it could also lead to more dystopian outcomes: chip implants that spy on or even control people's thoughts.

 

"This is exciting, and a little scary," said Henry Greely, JD, the Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and steering committee chair of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, who played no role in the study but is familiar with its contents and described himself as "very impressed" by the findings. "It demonstrates, first, that we can see when someone's dealing with numbers and, second, that we may conceivably someday be able to manipulate the brain to affect how someone deals with numbers."

 

The researchers monitored electrical activity in a region of the brain called the intraparietal sulcus, known to be important in attention and eye and hand motion. Previous studies have hinted that some nerve-cell clusters in this area are also involved in numerosity, the mathematical equivalent of literacy.

 

However, the techniques that previous studies have used, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, are limited in their ability to study brain activity in real-life settings and to pinpoint the precise timing of nerve cells' firing patterns. These studies have focused on testing just one specific function in one specific brain region, and have tried to eliminate or otherwise account for every possible confounding factor. In addition, the experimental subjects would have to lie more or less motionless inside a dark, tubular chamber whose silence would be punctuated by constant, loud, mechanical, banging noises while images flashed on a computer screen.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

A Blueprint for Restoring Touch With a Prosthetic Hand

A Blueprint for Restoring Touch With a Prosthetic Hand | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers develop a new blueprint for touch-sensitive prosthetic limbs. The findings could someday convey real-time sensory information for amputees.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

I’m ok, you’re not ok: The right supramarginal gyrus plays an important role in empathy | PsyPost

I’m ok, you’re not ok: The right supramarginal gyrus plays an important role in empathy | PsyPost | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Egoism and narcissism appear to be on the rise in our society, while empathy is on the decline. And yet, the ability to put ourselves in other people’s shoes is extremely important for our coexistence.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Sticks and stones: Brain releases natural painkillers during social rejection, U-M study finds | University of Michigan Health System

Sticks and stones: Brain releases natural painkillers during social rejection, U-M study finds | University of Michigan Health System | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
"Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me,” goes the playground rhyme that’s supposed to help children endure taunts.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Center for Investigating Healthy Minds - Behavioral and Neural Correlates of Pro-social Behavior

Behavioral and Neural Correlates of Pro-social Behavior
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Lawrence Barsalou Website

Lawrence Barsalou Website | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Lawrence Barsalou's research addresses the nature of human conceptual processing, and its roles in perception, memory, language, and thought. The current theme of his research is that the human conceptual system is grounded in the brain’s modal systems for perception, action, and introspection.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Hitoshi Okamoto, M.D., Ph.D. | Faculty Explorer | RIKEN Brain Science Institute (RIKEN BSI)

Hitoshi Okamoto, M.D., Ph.D. | Faculty Explorer | RIKEN Brain Science Institute (RIKEN BSI) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Research overview and publication list - Hitoshi Okamoto, M.D., Ph.D., RIKEN Brain Science Institute (RIKEN BSI)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Research - Etkin Lab - Stanford Medicine

Research - Etkin Lab - Stanford Medicine | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The overarching aim of the Etkin lab is to understand the neural basis of emotional disorders and their treatment, and to leverage this knowledge to develop novel treatment interventions. Our work is organized around the study of affective neuroscience of emotion regulation in healthy subjects and individuals with psychiatric disorders. Studies aimed at understanding the neurobiology of treatment for anxiety or depression addresses:(a) which domains of neural/mental functions are involved, (b) how different approaches yield their effects, (c) how individual differences in capacities like emotion regulation underlie differential outcome, and (d) how the mechanisms of change with pharmacological methods relate to and interact with those involved in non-pharmacological methods.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Oxford Centre for Emotions and Affective Neuroscience (OCEAN) — Department of Experimental Psychology

Oxford Centre for Emotions and Affective Neuroscience (OCEAN) — Department of Experimental Psychology | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The Oxford Centre for Emotions and Affective Neuroscience (OCEAN) aims to understand why some people are resilient and able to withstand whatever life throws at them, while others are emotionally vulnerable and at risk of developing anxiety disorders and depression. We use a variety of multidisciplinary approaches utilizing methods from cognitive psychology, neuroscience and molecular genetics to understand human emotions and affective reactivity across the lifespan.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

A. D. (Bud) Craig on the Anterior Insula and Human Awareness

A. D. (Bud) Craig on the Anterior Insula and Human Awareness | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A. D. (Bud) Craig on the Anterior Insula and Human Awareness; Fast Moving Fronts commentary from the field of Neuroscience & Behavior.
more...
Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:42 AM

"The insula is physically hidden beneath the overlying folds of parietal and temporal cortex that form the Sylvian fissure, and so it has often been simply ignored. My paper describes how the insula substantializes human feelings from the body, and it highlights new evidence indicating that the insula may engender all feelings, and even awareness.

Prior to my paper, it had generally been taught that the insula is an archaic deep brain structure related to visceral function and autonomic control, that all sensations and feelings from the body involve the classical somatosensory cortex, and that human consciousness involves vast connectional networks across the entire cerebral cortex or speculative quantum mechanical interactions. To the best of my knowledge, no prior author had considered the possibility that consciousness might be engendered by a particular region of hidden cortex.

"The upcoming studies of insular function will enable deep insights into the neural basis for subjectivity, feelings, volition, individual personality, belief, and self-modulation."

More specifically, the model I proposed in this paper posits that the primary interoceptive cortex in the dorsal posterior insula provides the basis for a progressive integration of increasingly energy-efficient homeostatic re-representations extending from posterior to anterior in the insula that successively incorporate all neural activity; this integration culminates in a representation of all salient activity at each moment of present time that underpins a cinemascopic representation of the sentient self, or the "material me."

In the model, comparator buffers that enable the feelings of the present moment to be compared with those from a past moment or the anticipated feelings of a future moment provide the basis for an introspective subjectivity that cannot "see" itself, because it is always one tick late, consonant with the description of consciousness by William James. In this model, the representation of feelings in the insula (or, limbic sensory cortex) is complemented by the representation of behavioral agency in the anterior cingulate, or limbic motor cortex.

I suggested that the evolution of the homeostatic integration of all neural activity in the insula was driven by the increasing proportion of the body's energy budget that is utilized by the hominid brain (approximately 25% in adult humans, and as much as 60% in infants). This proposal is consistent with the social brain hypothesis of evolutionary hominid forebrain enlargement and with the recognition that energy utilization is a crucial arbiter of brain evolution.

This proposal provides a solid basis for new perspectives on the forebrain asymmetry of emotion, subjectivity, the emotional nature of subjective time, the emergence of music, and the high concentrations of "Von Economo neurons" that are peculiar to the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortices of hominid primates, whales, and elephants."

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from The future of medicine and health
Scoop.it!

Painkiller in brain buffers social snubs - Futurity

Painkiller in brain buffers social snubs - Futurity | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Research shows the brain releases natural painkillers during rejection to ease emotional pain. The discovery may help our understanding of depression and social anxieties.

What’s more, people who score high on a personality trait called resilience—the ability to adjust to environmental change—had the highest amount of natural painkiller activation.

The research team, based at the University of Michigan’s Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute, combined advanced brain-scanning that can track chemical release in the brain with a model of social rejection based on online dating.

They focused on the mu-opioid receptor system in the brain—the same system that the team has studied for years in relation to response to physical pain. Over more than a decade, their work has shown that when a person feels physical pain, their brains release chemicals called opioids into the space between neurons, dampening pain signals.

David T. Hsu, the lead author of the new paper that appears in the journal Nature, says the research on social rejection grew out of recent studies by others, which suggest that the brain pathways that are activated during physical pain and social pain are similar.

This is the first study to peer into the human brain to show that the opioid system is activated during social rejection,” says Hsu, a research assistant professor of psychiatry. “In general, opioids have been known to be released during social distress and isolation in animals, but where this occurs in the human brain has not been shown until now.”


Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.