Social Neuroscience Advances
5.9K views | +0 today
Follow
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Adding Empathy to Medical School Requirements | Center for Advancing Health

Adding Empathy to Medical School Requirements | Center for Advancing Health | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Is it possible for a young medical student to understand a patient's experience? Or the day-to-day life of a person with a chronic illness? In 'Healthy Privilege' – When You Just Can't Imagine Being Sick, Carolyn Thomas observes that "what I've learned since my heart attack is that, until you or somebody you care about are personally affected by a life-altering diagnosis, it's almost impossible to really get what being sick every day actually means. Such is the bliss – and the ignorance – of healthy privilege."

 

After experiencing a rare eye infection that resulted in her "worst  pain ever," first-year medical student Natalie Wilcox shared that "as doctors, it is our job not only to provide care, but to comfort, and to do this we must acknowledge our patients' feelings." While noting that every person experiences pain differently, Wilcox adds, "By recalling my own pain, I bring forth real empathy rooted in shared experience."


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
Louise Botha's curator insight, November 12, 2013 7:23 PM

Most of us will at some time be on the receiving end of hospital care. Surely it does not take that experience for us to show empathy for our patients

Sophia Nguyen's curator insight, July 29, 2015 5:28 AM

This is something that is important to learn because not only do you have to talk to the patient, you have to be able to understand and get a sense of what they are feeling and where they are coming from. I think it's better to have a doctor who can empathize than one who is just there to get the job done.

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

'Cave' men lead scientific way with revolutionary 3D imaging - Sydney Morning Herald

'Cave' men lead scientific way with revolutionary 3D imaging - Sydney Morning Herald | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
'Cave' men lead scientific way with revolutionary 3D imaging Sydney Morning Herald ''When we say circuitry, we really mean it because they really are carrying electrical signals,'' said computational imaging scientist David Barnes as he stands,...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Envy: The Feeling Can Help Us Even When It Hurts (preview)

Envy. Socrates viewed it as “the ulcer of the soul.” Shakespeare's Iago, in Othello , gave us the term “green-eyed monster,” forever tingeing it an emerald hue.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Gut Bacteria May Exacerbate Depression

The digestive tract and the brain are crucially linked, according to mounting evidence showing that diet and gut bacteria are able to influence our behavior, thoughts and mood.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Home - 2013 Annual Meeting - American Neurological Association

Home - 2013 Annual Meeting - American Neurological Association | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The American Neurological Association is home to academic neurology.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

The brain basis of social synchrony

The brain basis of social synchrony | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

As a social species, humans evolved to detect information from the social behavior of others. Yet, the mechanisms used to evaluate social interactions, the brain networks implicated in such recognition, and whether individual differences in own social behavior determine response to similar behavior in others remain unknown.


Here we examined social synchrony as a potentially important mechanism in the evaluation of social behavior and utilized the parenting context, an evolutionarily salient setting of significant consequences for infant survival, to test this issue.


The brain response of healthy postpartum mothers to three mother–infant interaction vignettes was assessed. Videos included a typical synchronous interaction and two pathological interactions of mothers diagnosed with postpartum depression and anxiety that showed marked deviations from social synchrony. Mothers’ own interactions with their 4- to 6-month-old infants were videotaped and micro-coded for synchrony. Results indicated that the recognition of social synchrony involved activations in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), fusiform, cuneus, inferior parietal lobule, supplementary motor area and NAcc. Mother’s own synchrony with her infant correlated with her dACC response to synchrony in others. Findings are consistent with models suggesting that social action underpins social recognition and highlight social synchrony and the mother–infant bond as one prototypical context for studying the brain basis of social understanding.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

We empathise more with our enemies than our friends - because we need to know when they're at their most dangerous

We empathise more with our enemies than our friends  - because we need to know when they're at their most dangerous | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers from the University of Southern California examined activity in the 'pain matrix' of the brain, which activates when a person watches another suffer.

 

Humans feel the pain of their enemies more strongly than the discomfort of their friends - because that is when their opponents are most dangerous and unpredictable, scientists claim.

 

While many people might assume that they would empathise most with those they care about, a study has found that the opposite is true and the reason is one of self preservation as humans need to understand why an enemy is in pain to rule out the risk of retribution.

U.S. scientists discovered the part of the brain that is associated with empathising with the pain of others is activated more strongly by watching the suffering of hated enemies.

 

By SARAH GRIFFITHS

 

 


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Social Rejection Triggers Release of Natural Painkillers in the Brain

Social Rejection Triggers Release of Natural Painkillers in the Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New study demonstrates that the brain treats social pain in a similar way to physical pain.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Five Surprising Ways Oxytocin Shapes Your Social Life

Five Surprising Ways Oxytocin Shapes Your Social Life | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research is finding that oxytocin doesn’t just bond us to mothers, lovers, and friends—it also seems to play a role in excluding others from that bond.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and HealthCare
Scoop.it!

Nonverbal Interpersonal Interactions in Clinical Encounters and Patient Perceptions of Empathy | Journal of Participatory Medicine

Nonverbal Interpersonal Interactions in Clinical Encounters and Patient Perceptions of Empathy | Journal of Participatory Medicine | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The authors show that eye contact and social touch are significantly related to patient perceptions of clinician empathy.

 

 ..The relationship between nonverbal behaviors and patient perceptions of clinicians has been underexplored. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between nonverbal communication behaviors (eye contact and social touch) to patient assessments of clinician (empathy, connectedness, and liking). Methods: Hypotheses were tested including clinician and patient nonverbal behaviors (eye contact, social touch) were coded temporally in 110 videotaped clinical encounters. Patient participants completed questionnaires to measure their perception of clinician empathy, connectedness with clinician, and how much they liked their clinician. Results: Length of visit and eye contact between clinician and patient were positively related to the patient’s assessment of the clinician’s empathy...

 

Enid Montague,

 Ping-yu Chen, 

Jie Xu, 

Betty Chewning & 

Bruce Barrett 


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Empathy? Surprising study shows that brains process the pain of villains more than the pain of people we like

Empathy? Surprising study shows that brains process the pain of villains more than the pain of people we like | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A counterintuitive findings from a new study show that the part of the brain that is associated with empathizing with the pain of others is activated more strongly by watching the suffering of hateful people as opposed to likable people.

 

While one might assume that we would empathize more with people we like, the study may indicate that the human brain focuses more greatly on the need to monitor enemies closely, especially when they are suffering.


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Glowing neurons reveal networked link between brain, whiskers

Glowing neurons reveal networked link between brain, whiskers | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Human fingertips have several types of sensory neurons that are responsible for relaying touch signals to the central nervous system. Scientists have long believed these neurons followed a linear path to the brain with a "labeled-lines" structure.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Cognitive Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

The social brain and its superpowers: Matthew Lieberman, Ph.D. at TEDxStLouis

Neuroscientist Matthew Lieberman explains that through his studies he's learned that our kryptonite is ignoring the importance of our social superpowers and ...

Via Sandeep Gautam
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

David Eagleman: Introducing social neuroscience - IQ2 Talks

This event took place at the Royal Institute of British Architects on 24th May 2012. Event info: Which side were you on? The Jets or the Sharks? The Capulets...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Salk Scientists Create A Light Switch For Brain Proteins - KPBS

Salk Scientists Create A Light Switch For Brain Proteins - KPBS | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
KPBS Salk Scientists Create A Light Switch For Brain Proteins KPBS "If you want to completely understand neuronal function, you need to be able to control different proteins inside the neuron." Wang predicts this technique will be useful to...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Gluttony: Are We Addicted to Eating? (preview)

I am a glutton. Most Americans are, it seems: more than two thirds of the population is overweight or obese, and that proportion continues to rise, even as public awareness of the importance of healthy eating is at an all-time high.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Neural correlates of emotion–cognition interactions: A review of evidence from brain imaging investigations

Complex dynamic behaviour involves reciprocal influences between emotion and cognition. On the one hand, emotion is a “double-edged sword” that may affect various aspects of our cognition and behaviour, by enhancing or hindering them and exerting both transient and long-term influences. On the other hand, emotion processing is also susceptible to cognitive influences, typically exerted in the form of emotion regulation. Noteworthy, both of these reciprocal influences are subjective to individual differences that may affect the way we perceive, experience, and eventually remember emotional experiences, or respond to emotionally challenging situations. Understanding these relationships is critical, as unbalanced emotion–cognition interactions may lead to devastating effects, such as those observed in mood and anxiety disorders. The present review analyses the reciprocal relationships between emotion and cognition, based on evidence derived from brain imaging investigations focusing on three main topics: (1) the impact of emotion on cognition, (2) the impact of cognition on emotion, and (3) the role of individual differences in emotion–cognition interactions. This evidence will be discussed in the context of identifying aspects that are fundamental to understanding the mechanisms underlying emotion–cognition interactions in healthy functioning, and to understanding changes associated with affective disorders.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

The Neuroeconomics Revolution by Robert J. Shiller - Project Syndicate

The Neuroeconomics Revolution by Robert J. Shiller - Project Syndicate | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Economics is at the start of a revolution that is traceable to an unexpected source: medical schools and their research facilities.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

The embodiment of emotion: language use during the feeling of social emotions predicts cortical somatosensory activity

The embodiment of emotion: language use during the feeling of social emotions predicts cortical somatosensory activity | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Complex social emotions involve both abstract cognitions and bodily sensations, and individuals may differ on their relative reliance on these.


We hypothesized that individuals’ descriptions of their feelings during a semi-structured emotion induction interview would reveal two distinct psychological styles—a more abstract, cognitive style and a more body-based, affective style—and that these would be associated with somatosensory neural activity.


We examined 28 participants’ open-ended verbal responses to admiration- and compassion-provoking narratives in an interview and BOLD activity to the same narratives during subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Consistent with hypotheses, individuals’ affective and cognitive word use were stable across emotion conditions, negatively correlated and unrelated to reported emotion strength in the scanner. Greater use of affective relative to cognitive words predicted more activation in SI, SII, middle anterior cingulate cortex and insula during emotion trials. The results suggest that individuals’ verbal descriptions of their feelings reflect differential recruitment of neural regions supporting physical body awareness. Although somatosensation has long been recognized as an important component of emotion processing, these results offer ‘proof of concept’ that individual differences in open-ended speech reflect different processing styles at the neurobiological level. This study also demonstrates SI involvement during social emotional experience.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Mindfulness training helps lower blood pressure - Medical News Today

Mindfulness training helps lower blood pressure - Medical News Today | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Mindfulness training helps lower blood pressure Medical News Today Here, an experienced instructor led them through three main types of mindfulness training - body scan exercises (where you draw awareness to particular parts of the body), sitting...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Psychologists report new insights on human brain, consciousness

Psychologists report new insights on human brain, consciousness | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
UCLA psychologists have used brain-imaging techniques to study what happens to the human brain when it slips into unconsciousness. Their research, published Oct.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Method of recording brain activity could lead to mind-reading devices, scientists say

Method of recording brain activity could lead to mind-reading devices, scientists say | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
by Bruce Goldman A brain region activated when people are asked to perform mathematical calculations in an experimental setting is similarly activated when they use numbers — or even imprecise quantitative terms, such as “more...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Anxiety Prevents Prosocial Behavior On A Genetic Level - Science News - redOrbit

Anxiety Prevents Prosocial Behavior On A Genetic Level - Science News - redOrbit | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A person’s willingness to volunteer and help others could be influenced by a gene that also impacts his or her level of social anxiety, according to research published in September’s edition of the journal Social Neuroscience.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

What's in a face? Researchers find patterns of neural activity in brain region that plays role in recognizing traits

What's in a face? Researchers find patterns of neural activity in brain region that plays role in recognizing traits | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When you meet people for the first time, what's the first thing you think you notice? Is it their hair color, or eye color? Maybe it's whether they're wearing a suit or a T-shirt and jeans, or whether they have a firm handshake.
more...
No comment yet.