Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics: Advances in Research and Caution about Application of Findings | CLBB

World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics: Advances in Research and Caution about Application of Findings | CLBB | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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How to Build a Happier Brain | Psychology, Soci...

How to Build a Happier Brain | Psychology, Soci... | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A neuropsychological approach to happiness, by meeting core needs (safety, satisfaction, and connection) and training neurons to overcome a negativity bias (How to Build a Happier Brain http://t.co/iL6GJWTxQ7... (How to Build a Happier Brain |...
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New insight into why each human face is unique

New insight into why each human face is unique | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The human face is as unique as a fingerprint, no one else looks exactly like you. But what is it that makes facial morphology so distinct?
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Empathy 101 | Mindful

Empathy 101 | Mindful | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Daniel Goleman looks at three types of empathy that leaders, teachers, and parents should have.

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The Joy Initiative

The Joy Initiative | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Jessica Neuroth was feeling overwhelmed. As a first-year student in MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine, she was finding that balancing an extremely demanding course of study and family issues was more stressful than anticipated.
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Keeping it local: Protecting the brain starts at the synapse

Keeping it local: Protecting the brain starts at the synapse | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research by scientists at UC San Francisco shows that one of the brain's fundamental self-protection mechanisms depends on coordinated, finely calibrated teamwork among neurons and non-neural cells knows as glial cells, which until fairly...
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What is a representative brain? Neuroscience meets population science

The last decades of neuroscience research have produced immense progress in the methods available to understand brain structure and function. Social, cognitive, clinical, affective, economic, communication, and developmental neurosciences have begun to map the relationships between neuro-psychological processes and behavioral outcomes, yielding a new understanding of human behavior and promising interventions. However, a limitation of this fast moving research is that most findings are based on small samples of convenience. Furthermore, our understanding of individual differences may be distorted by unrepresentative samples, undermining findings regarding brain–behavior mechanisms. These limitations are issues that social demographers, epidemiologists, and other population scientists have tackled, with solutions that can be applied to neuroscience. By contrast, nearly all social science disciplines, including social demography, sociology, political science, economics, communication science, and psychology, make assumptions about processes that involve the brain, but have incorporated neural measures to differing, and often limited, degrees; many still treat the brain as a black box. In this article, we describe and promote a perspective—population neuroscience—that leverages interdisciplinary expertise to (i) emphasize the importance of sampling to more clearly define the relevant populations and sampling strategies needed when using neuroscience methods to address such questions; and (ii) deepen understanding of mechanisms within population science by providing insight regarding underlying neural mechanisms. Doing so will increase our confidence in the generalizability of the findings. We provide examples to illustrate the population neuroscience approach for specific types of research questions and discuss the potential for theoretical and applied advances from this approach across areas.

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Native-like brain processing of second language possible in university students

Native-like brain processing of second language possible in university students | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Along with helping students gain a global perspective, study abroad experiences may give college students a particular kind of advantage in learning another language.
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Deric Bownds' MindBlog: Oxytocin dilates our pupils and enhances emotion detection

Deric Bownds' MindBlog: Oxytocin dilates our pupils and enhances emotion detection | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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Neuron 'claws' in the brain enable flies to distinguish one scent from another

Neuron 'claws' in the brain enable flies to distinguish one scent from another | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Think of the smell of an orange, a lemon, and a grapefruit. Each has strong acidic notes mixed with sweetness. And yet each fresh, bright scent is distinguishable from its relatives.
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Is Being a Good Samaritan a Matter of Genes?

Is Being a Good Samaritan a Matter of Genes? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What motivates people to help others? Could altruistic behavior be influenced by genes?
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Why Do Human Beings Do Good Things? The Puzzle of Altruism

Why Do Human Beings Do Good Things? The Puzzle of Altruism | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Altruism isn't always just disguised self-interest. 'Pure' altruism does exist.

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Synapse Evolution with Seth Grant (BSP 101)

Synapse Evolution with Seth Grant (BSP 101) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Seth Grant (click photo to hear interview)

Early in his career Seth Grant helped develop the transgenic mice that
Eric Kandel used in his studies of how memory works.

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David McGavock's curator insight, October 19, 2013 6:25 PM

"Recently Grant's work has focused on the discovery that the vertebrate synapse is actually much more complex than the one present in invertebrates. For BSP 101 we got together to talk about two papers he and his collegues recently published in Nature Neuroscience. These papers explore how small changes in the synapse proteins effect learning in measurable ways."

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Dendritic spines, memories, and memories of dendritic spines

Dendritic spines, memories, and memories of dendritic spines | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—Nothing raises the hackles on the neck of a neurobiologist like talk of dendritic spines on neurons.
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Women are significantly better at multitasking than men

Women are significantly better at multitasking than men | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—Women are better than men at carrying out multiple tasks according to new research from a team of psychologists including researchers from the University of Hertfordshire.
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Researchers apply brainpower to understanding neural stem cell differentiation

Researchers apply brainpower to understanding neural stem cell differentiation | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
How do humans and other mammals get so brainy? USC researcher Wange Lu, PhD, and his colleagues shed new light on this question in a paper that will be published in Cell Reports on October 24.
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Martin Seligman, Wellbeing Before Learning Conference Keynote

Martin Seligman's keynote address at the Wellbeing Before Learning Conference, sponsored by Adelaide Thinkers in Residence.

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Delaying gratification, when the reward is under our noses

Delaying gratification, when the reward is under our noses | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
How can some people resist the attraction of immediate pleasures and pursue long-term goals, while others easily succumb and compromise their ultimate expectations?
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Why We Are Wired To Connect: Scientific American

Why We Are Wired To Connect: Scientific American | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientist Matthew Lieberman uncovers the neuroscience of human connections — and the broad implications for how we live our lives
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3 Ways Your Emotional Brain Can Help You Communicate with Your Partner - PsychCentral.com (blog)

3 Ways Your Emotional Brain Can Help You Communicate with Your Partner - PsychCentral.com (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
3 Ways Your Emotional Brain Can Help You Communicate with Your Partner PsychCentral.com (blog) It's why women spend so much time thinking about relationships and men spend so much time thinking about work and sports (today's version of hunting and...

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Ken Donaldson's curator insight, October 23, 2013 9:10 AM

"...the female brain began to develop better ways to emotionally connect with others and the Emotional Brain is now 25 percent larger in women than in men."

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Emotional Agility

Sixteen thousand—that’s how many words we speak, on average, each day. So imagine how many unspoken ones course through our minds. Most of them are not facts but evaluations and judgments entwined with emotions—some positive and helpful (I’ve worked hard and I can ace this presentation; This issue is worth speaking up about; The new VP seems approachable), others negative and less so (He’s purposely ignoring me; I’m going to make a fool of myself; I’m a fake).



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DNews: Can You Spot a Fake Smile? : DNews

DNews: Can You Spot a Fake Smile? : DNews | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The difference in the meaning of a genuine smile and a fake smile is vast. Trace tells us what to look for when we think someone might just be putting on a show.
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Did The Good Samaritan Have A Special Genotype? | IdeaFeed | Big Think

Did The Good Samaritan Have A Special Genotype? | IdeaFeed | Big Think | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research shows that variations in a particular genotype can make a person more likely to participate in "prosocial" acts, such as rescuing someone from drowning.
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Frontiers | Effects of voice on emotional arousal | Frontiers in Emotion Science

Music is a powerful medium capable of eliciting a broad range of emotions.

Music is a powerful medium capable of eliciting a broad range of emotions. Although the relationship between language and music is well documented, relatively little is known about the effects of lyrics and the voice on the emotional processing of music and on listeners' preferences. In the present study, we investigated the effects of vocals in music on participants' perceived valence and arousal in songs. Participants (N = 50) made valence and arousal ratings for familiar songs that were presented with and without the voice. We observed robust effects of vocal content on perceived arousal. Furthermore, we found that the effect of the voice on enhancing arousal ratings is independent of familiarity of the song and differs across genders and age: females were more influenced by vocals than males; furthermore these gender effects were enhanced among older adults. Results highlight the effects of gender and aging in emotion perception and are discussed in terms of the social roles of music.


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