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Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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The Emotionally Intelligent Brain, Part 2

The Emotionally Intelligent Brain, Part 2 | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Four Pathways to Retraining Your Brain This is the follow-up to my December 1st post, which was based on an article by UCLA researcher Daniel Siegel. His article describes a healthy brain-mind usin...

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Gina Stepp's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:39 PM

In his latest post on The EQ Psych, Dr. Sam Alibrando offers 4 pathways to raise awareness so you can retrain your brain. 

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The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part I

The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part I | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Excerpt from article written and curated by Robin Good and first published on MasterNewMedia:
"Content curation tools are in their infancy. Nonetheless you see so many of them around, there are more new curation tools coming your way soon, with lots of new features and options.

Enormous progress has been made since the early days of the first news curation tools to what is available today, but yet, I feel we have only barely scratched the surface.

To illustrate what I expect to see on this front, here is a panoramic tour of the traits, features, patterns and trends that I expect will characterize the future of digital content curation tools, organized into specific feature areas.

1) Display Formats of Curated Content Collections
The first area in which I expect to see lots of improvement and innovative ideas is the one of how a curated collection or stream can be displayed to the user.
This is one of the most underestimated and underutilized areas of improvement for content curation tools.

2) Slicing and Dicing
Some of the present-day content curation tools, including Scoop.it, Spundge and several others, do allow you to tag and filter content but none provides a direct facility to easily create sub-sets that gather together collection items with the same characteristics.

3) Micro - Macro
One other badly needed feature, that I hope will see its way in some of the leading content curation tools, is the ability to instantly switch from a bird’s eye view of a topic to the detailed view of a specific information item.

4) Recurate
Another area that offers great opportunities for innovation and for the introduction of new useful features is the one covering the ability to assess, managing inventories, organize and curate one’s own existing assets.

5) News Discovery
The main problem with news discovery arises from the fact that quality filters and algorithms capable of both fully understanding the topic of interest, not just by way of a keyword or a hashtag but by semantic inference, and capable of identifying the relevant sources among so many noise-making content marketers reposting other people stuff, are not easy to build.
The best way to uncover, identify and identify new quality sources and content items may be to employ a balanced mix of automated search filters augmented by human curators that can supervise, edit, refine and improve on what is gathered by the algos.

6) Ownership
The main benefit offered by content curation platforms that require you to curate and publish first via their systems (Scoop.it, Pinterest, etc.) is that they provide you with an existing broad audience readily interested in your content. For someone just starting out online, this can be a huge booster.
The con side of the equation is that your rights on what you have curated as well as the physical ownership of that content is not under your control anymore. And for those already having good visibility and reputation online, this may not be the most attractive proposition.

7) Credit and Attribution
For professional curators the need to properly and systematically credit and attribute the content and sources utilized is not a secondary matter. Discovery of new interesting content is at the heart of the curator job, and facilitating the exchange on meta-data that provides credit and hints as to who has been of help in discovering something will increasingly be a highly valued activity..."

Each point is analyzed with more information and external links. Read full, interesting and detailed article here:
http://www.masternewmedia.org/content-curation-tools-future-part1/

 

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Margarida Sá Costa
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Ajo Monzó's curator insight, December 19, 2013 2:20 AM

Thanks!

Debbie Elicksen 's curator insight, December 20, 2013 4:49 PM

Scooping this to basically reference it for more tips on curating. We are all works in progress.

Russell Yardley's curator insight, December 25, 2013 4:01 PM

With billions of people connected through social media and directly connected with email traditional curators of news and other content have had their business models destroyed but it has not surprisingly taken many years for better models to emerge. 

 

The widsom of crowds is well known but so is their stupidity (stock market crashes, group think, lowest common denominator in election outcomes...). Better curating tools and systems are beginning to show that valuable curators of the worlds content are able to find their audience and enrich the world with deep insight that replace the extremely low numbers of curators of the past (news paper barons).

 

Some of these curators will be paid and others do it just for the joy of it. Collectively they will reshape thinking and ultimately the world. 

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Determinants of patient loyalty to provider identified

Determinants of patient loyalty to provider identified | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(HealthDay)—Determinants of patient loyalty have been identified and include confidence in care provider and coordination of care, according to a report published by Press Ganey.
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Emotional Intelligence Predicts Job Success: Do You Have It?

Emotional Intelligence Predicts Job Success: Do You Have It? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The best salespeople and leaders have a high EQ. Daniel Goleman the man who coined the term pulls apart the aspects of emotional intelligence.

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Ken Donaldson's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:28 PM
EQ does it again...
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Design Thinking: A Better Way to Gain Empathy for Our Elderly Users | Aging2.0

Design Thinking: A Better Way to Gain Empathy for Our Elderly Users | Aging2.0 | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

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NIMH · Ten Best of 2013

NIMH · Ten Best of 2013 | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Dr. Insel reviews his “top ten” selections for 2013, including research advances and historic policy changes affecting mental health care. (Good set of blogs on current mental health research and issues..
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Why We Love: 5 Books on the Psychology of Love

Why We Love: 5 Books on the Psychology of Love | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What Oscar Wilde has to do with Hippocrates and the neurochemistry of romance.

It's often said that every song, every poem, every novel,
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A single hormone may drive monogamy in relationships. - Minneapolis Star Tribune

A single hormone may drive monogamy in relationships. - Minneapolis Star Tribune | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Minneapolis Star Tribune
A single hormone may drive monogamy in relationships.
Minneapolis Star Tribune
The answer may lie in a steady diet of oxytocin that triggers dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with reward, motivation and addiction.
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You Won't Believe How Accurate GE's New CT Scanner Is

You Won't Believe How Accurate GE's New CT Scanner Is | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Even after 40 years of service, X-ray computed tomography (better known as CT scans) can be a challenge to capture. If the patient moves even a nudge, the image will come out blurry.
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Dan Siegel - Mindfulness, Psychotherapy and the Brain | iThou.org

Dan Siegel - Mindfulness, Psychotherapy and the Brain | iThou.org | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

In this article the principles of an interdisciplinary approach to psychotherapy called “interpersonal neurobiology” will be summarized with an emphasis on neuroscience findings regarding the mirror neuron system and neural plasticity. Interpersonal neurobiology is a “consilient” approach that examines independent fields of knowing to find the common principles that emerge to paint a picture of the “larger whole” of human experience and development. Interpersonal neurobiology attempts to extract the wisdom from over a dozen different disciplines of science to weave a picture of human experience and the process of change across the lifespan.

The perspective of “interpersonal neurobiology” is to build a model within which the objective domains of science and the subjective domains of human knowing can find a common home. An interpersonal neurobiology approach to psychotherapy draws on the basic framework of this interdisciplinary view in exploring the ways in which one individual can help others alleviate suffering and move toward well-being. The central idea of interpersonal neurobiology is to offer a definition of the mind and of mental well-being that can be used by a wide range of professionals concerned with human development.

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6 Surprising Scientific Findings About Good and Evil | Mother Jones

Harvard's Joshua Greene on the evolution of morality—and why humanity may, objectively, be getting better in the long run.
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No two people smell the same

No two people smell the same | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A difference at the smallest level of DNA—one amino acid on one gene—can determine whether you find a given smell pleasant.
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The brain's data compression mechanisms: Neurons subtract images and use the differences

The brain's data compression mechanisms: Neurons subtract images and use the differences | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
that's the information volume transmitted every second with every quick eye movement from the eye to the cerebrum.


"Our brain is permanently looking into the future"

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Study confirms a gene linked to Asperger Syndrome and empathy

Study confirms a gene linked to Asperger Syndrome and empathy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

(Medical Xpress)—Scientists have confirmed that variations in a particular gene play a key role in the autism spectrum condition known as Asperger Syndrome. They have also found that variations in the same gene are also linked to differences in empathy levels in the general population.

 

A study to be published later this month in the journal Molecular Autism confirms previous research that people with Asperger Syndrome (AS) are more likely to carry specific variations in a particular gene. More strikingly, the study supports existing findings that the same gene is also linked to how much empathy typically shown by individuals in the general population. 

 

The research was carried out by a team of researchers led by Professor Baron-Cohen at the Autism Research Centre at Cambridge University. Asperger Syndrome is an autism spectrum condition. 


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Empathy + Equity → Justice

Empathy + Equity → Justice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The good news is that the neural networks that reflect a lack of empathy and reveal moral exclusion are not destiny. The research on implicit bias tells us that we can repattern these neural connections through conscious effort. Brene Brown also describes four features of empathy, which are actually practices we can embrace and improve: taking another’s perspective, staying out of judgment, recognizing others’ emotions, and communicating those emotions. Building empathy—practicing love—becomes a powerful way to build the connections between people that can lead to justice.


CYNTHIA SILVA PARKER


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Happiness: The Contagion Theory

Happiness: The Contagion Theory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"Have you ever noticed how being around nutsy/negative people can make you feel nutsy/negative?

Psychologists call this “emotional contagion” – and there’s even evolutionary reasons for why someone else’s curmudgeonly ways can infect you.

“The original form is the contagion of fear and alarm,” said Frans de Waal, a psychologist and primate expert at Atlanta’s Emory University. “You’re in a flock of birds. One bird suddenly takes off. You have no time to wait and see what’s going on. You take off, too. Otherwise, you’re lunch.”

Translation: Getting caught up in another’s negativity is a hard-wired survival mechanism.

“I have often noticed how primate groups in their entirety enter a similar mood,” de Waal said. “All of a sudden, all of them are playful, hopping around. Or all of them are grumpy. Or all of them are sleepy and settle down. In such cases, the mood contagion serves the function of synchronizing activities. The individual who doesn’t stay in tune with what everyone is doing will lose out, like the traveler who didn’t go the restroom when the bus stopped.”

Translation: Contagion theory of happiness also explains the powerful energy of “mob mentality” and why there’s a tendency for groups of people in a movie theater or concert to share a similar feeling for the move or concert.

Plus psychologists believe that “the contagion theory of happiness” is yet another form of our hard-wired mimicry we humans do – our instinctive human tendency to unconsciously imitate other people’s facial expressions, vocalizations, postures, and body movements.

For example, if someone scratches their nose, you might suddenly feel your nostrils twitch. Or if someone yawns and stretches and gets sleepy, you might yawn and feel more tired too.

Indeed, mimicry is such a strong foundation of our human emotional development that even at a mere 1-hour old, a newborn infant will be hard-wired to mimic a person’s facial gestures.

Hence why you can smile at 1-hour old baby, and this 1-hour old baby will smile back!

Translation: Our built-in human system for mimicry, explains why we humans can transfer our good and bad moods to each other.

The Journal of Applied Psychology offered up a study which showed the downer effects of a downer leader on a group. They took 189 volunteer undergraduates, divided them into 63 groups of 3, and told them they were taking part in a team-building exercise to put up a tent. Then a “leader” was chosen for each team, and shown either of video clip of a “Saturday Night Live” skits or a vignette on torture — to create either a positive/up beat mood or a negative/downer mood.

The result: If a leader was up, the team members’ moods rose. But if the leader was down, everyone became down.

Numerous other studies have also shown how when one person in a romantic coupling gets depressed, the other also becomes more depressed.

Psychologists believe this transfer of emotions is yet another form of empathy.

In London’s University College, psychologist Tonia Singer and colleagues used brain scans to explore empathy in 19 romantic couples. She hooked both individuals to brain scans. One partner in the couple was given a slight electric shock while the other partner watched. Each of their scans showed identical brain reactions. Although only one partner was shocked, both of the partner’s pain center lighted up – as if both had been jolted.

On a more happy note… Howard Friedman, a psychologist at University of California at Irvine thinks “emotional contagion” is also why some people can move and inspire others to positive action – like a good coach or a powerful preacher – or a joyous/exuberant partner in a romantic coupling.

Friedman believes it’s because the happy person’s happy facial expression, happy voice, happy gestures and happy body movements all together conspire to transmit happy emotions to all those around the happy person!"

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Angie Mc's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:56 PM

Today decide to be a HAPPINESS TRANSMITTER! <- Like that :)

Miguel Garcia's curator insight, December 19, 2013 5:48 AM

tal vez no sea la felicidad lo q se contagia pero si el estado de ánimo.

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Understanding Compassion Starts with Understanding Others

Understanding Compassion Starts with Understanding Others | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

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Edwin Rutsch's curator insight, December 15, 2013 2:34 PM

Happy Holidays! In the spirit of love, warmth and companionship, I’ve made this infographic on the scientific benefits of Compassion!

 

We often think that we will gain happiness by achieving, receiving or attaining. We also think that in order to be happy, we have to receive love. Think again!

 

Research shows that our greatest fulfillment comes in large part from being connected to others and from helping them.

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Top 10 Scientific Benefits of Compassion (Infographic) - Emma Seppälä, Ph.D.

Top 10 Scientific Benefits of Compassion (Infographic) - Emma Seppälä, Ph.D. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Happy Holidays! In the spirit of love, warmth and companionship, I’ve made this infographic on the scientific benefits of Compassion! We often think that we will gain happiness by achieving, receiving or attaining.

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John Michel's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:33 AM

We often think that we will gain happiness by achieving, receiving or attaining. We also think that in order to be happy, we have to receive love. Think again! Research shows that our greatest fulfillment comes in large part from being connected to others and from helping them.

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Happiness results in fewer doctor visits

Happiness results in fewer doctor visits | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—An apple a day may keep the doctor away, but happiness may be the best prescription, says a University of Michigan researcher.
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A Calm Look at the Most Hyped Concept in Neuroscience - Mirror Neurons - Wired Science

A Calm Look at the Most Hyped Concept in Neuroscience - Mirror Neurons - Wired Science | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

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Gerald Carey's curator insight, December 14, 2013 7:14 PM

Christian Jarrett gives mirror neurons the once-over.

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23 Tips For Men on Supporting a Partner with Chronic Pain

23 Tips For Men on Supporting a Partner with Chronic Pain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Pete Beisner knows a lot about supporting a partner in pain. Here, he shares insights on how to take care of the person you love.
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"Stories of Complicated Grief: A Critical Anthology"

"Stories of Complicated Grief: A Critical Anthology" | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
"Stories of Complicated Grief: A Critical Anthology," edited by Eric Miller, PhD, is a unique contribution to the literature on complicated grief.
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Brain Scans Used To Replicate Jung's Word Association Test

Brain Scans Used To Replicate Jung's Word Association Test | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A group of researchers have used fMRI brain scans to replicate CG Jung's Word Association Test, and achieved interesting results.
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New Alzheimer's Treatment Targets Blood Vessel Cells In Brain

New Alzheimer's Treatment Targets Blood Vessel Cells In Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists have targeted the cells surrounding blood vessels in the brain as potential treatment routes for Alzheimer's disease.
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