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The psychopathic spectrum

The psychopathic spectrum | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
  The psychopathic spectrum Paola Giannetakis, University of North Dakota   In the XIX century, Philippe Pinel (1745-1826), considered the founder of modern psychiatry, and Emil Kraepelin (1856-1926) that echoed the thoughts of Pinel, use, for the...
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
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Adaptable decision making in the brain

Adaptable decision making in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have discovered how a part of the brain helps predict future events from past experiences.

Via Donald J Bolger
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Protein essential for cognition and mental health identified

Protein essential for cognition and mental health identified | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The ability to maintain mental representations of ourselves and the world -- the fundamental building block of human cognition -- arises from the firing of highly evolved neuronal circuits, a process that is weakened in schizophrenia.

Via Donald J Bolger
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UCI researchers find epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders

UCI researchers find epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Dysfunction in dopamine signaling profoundly changes the activity level of about 2,000 genes in the brain’s prefrontal cortex and may be an underlying cause of certain complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, according to UC Irvine scientists.

Via Donald J Bolger
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Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations

Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations, previously believed that only the brain could perform. This is according to a study from Umeå University in Sweden published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.
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Memory in silent neurons

Memory in silent neurons | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When we learn, we associate a sensory experience either with other stimuli or with a certain type of behaviour. The neurons in the cerebral cortex that transmit the information modify the synaptic connections that they have with the other neurons.
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Six Habits of Highly Empathic People

Six Habits of Highly Empathic People | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Are you a HEP (highly empathic person)? Well, even if you're not, it's possible to cultivate these highly pro-social traits.
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New estrogen-based compound suppresses binge-like eating behavior in female mice

New estrogen-based compound suppresses binge-like eating behavior in female mice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Binge eating, an eating disorder in which a person frequently consumes unusually large amounts of food in a short period of time, affects about 5 to 10 percent of U.S. adults and is more common in women than men.
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Antidepressants show potential for postoperative pain

Antidepressants show potential for postoperative pain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Anesthesiologists examine studies where antidepressants were prescribed for pain after surgery. Clinical trials are often used to answer questions about the efficacy of the off-label uses of drugs.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from the plastic brain
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What happens when you remove the hippocampus? - Sam Kean

What happens when you remove the hippocampus? - Sam Kean | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When Henry Molaison (now widely known as H.M.) cracked his skull in an
accident, he began blacking out and having seizures. In an attempt to
cure him, daredevil surgeon Dr. William Skoville removed H.M.'s
hippocampus. Luckily, the seizures did go away — but so did his
long-term memory! Sam Kean walks us through this astonishing medical case,
detailing everything H.M. taught us about the brain and memory.

Via iPamba
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Social Affective Neuroscience
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The Neuroscience of Resiliency: An Interview with Linda Graham - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy

The Neuroscience of Resiliency: An Interview with Linda Graham - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Linda Graham, author of Bouncing Back shares with us what we can do to wire a more resilient brain.

Via Anne Leong, Teodora Stoica
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Your Brain Judges Trustworthiness Before You Know It - PsychCentral.com

Your Brain Judges Trustworthiness Before You Know It - PsychCentral.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Your Brain Judges Trustworthiness Before You Know It PsychCentral.com Your brain makes a spontaneous judgment of whether or not another person's face is trustworthy before you are even conscious of it, according to new research published in the...
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A New Understanding of Compassionate Empathy

A New Understanding of Compassionate Empathy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A User's Guide To Compassionate Empathy


Sharing our deep feelings is the way out of the isolation of loneliness. It creates a doorway into the practice of what we call compassionat eempathy.


Compassionate empathy is the key to getting out of an irrelationship.

While empathy can be all-absorbing[consuming] and leave one totally empty and burned-out, to the point that one loses a sense of one’s own boundaries, compassionate empathy allows behaviors that allow profound feelings of connection to another person, without danger to one’s own emotional balance because the compassion applies to oneself and others. 


Empathy alone, on the other hand, can become very lopsided when compulsive caregiving is involved. Compassionate empathy is built on the skill of sharing honestly with another person. It makes isolation difficult to maintain because it undermines self-obsession.  Compassion is the antidote to compulsion.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Neuroscientists watch imagination happening in the brain | neuroscientistnews.com

Neuroscientists watch imagination happening in the brain | neuroscientistnews.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
"You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one," sang John Lennon in his 1971 song Imagine. And thanks to the dreams of a Brigham Young University (BYU) student, we now know more about where and how imagination happens in our brains. Stefania Ashby and her faculty mentor devised experiments using MRI technology that would help them distinguish pure imagination from related processes like remembering. "I was thinking a lot about planning for my own future and imagining myself in the future, and I started wondering how memory and imagination work together," Ashby said. "I wondered if they were separate or if imagination is just taking past memories and combining them in different ways to form something I've never experienced before." There's a bit of scientific debate over whether memory and imagination truly are distinct processes. So Ashby and her faculty mentor devised MRI experiments to put it to the test. - See more at: http://www.neuroscientistnews.com/research-news/neuroscientists-watch-imagination-happening-brain#sthash.Bv6SlA1Y.dpuf

Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Functional organization of the insula and inner perisylvian regions

In the last few years, the insula has been the focus of many brain-imaging studies, mostly devoted to clarify its role in emotions and social communication. Physiological data, however, on which one may ground these correlative findings are almost totally lacking. Here, we investigated the functional properties of the insular cortex in behaving monkeys using intracortical microstimulation. Behavioral responses and heart rate changes were recorded. The results showed that the insula is functionally formed by two main subdivisions: (i) a sensorimotor field occupying the caudal–dorsal portion of the insula and appearing as an extension of the parietal lobe; and (ii) a mosaic of orofacial motor programs located in the anterior and centroventral insula sector.


Via Donald J Bolger
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Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep

Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Mouse brains get washed with cerebrospinal fluid while they sleep. Humans may use the same process.

Via Donald J Bolger
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Licia Freeman's curator insight, March 24, 1:28 PM

One more benefit of sleep!

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
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Rapid whole-brain imaging with single cell resolution

Rapid whole-brain imaging with single cell resolution | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

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Donald J Bolger's curator insight, August 13, 11:15 AM

This sounds too good to be true!

 

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Training your brain to prefer healthy foods

Training your brain to prefer healthy foods | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, according to new research by scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University...
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Memory and Alzheimer’s: Towards a better comprehension of the dynamic mechanisms

Memory and Alzheimer’s: Towards a better comprehension of the dynamic mechanisms | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Montréal, August 31, 2014 – A study just published in the prestigious Nature Neuroscience journal by, Sylvain Williams, PhD, and his team, of the Research Centre of the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University, opens the...
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The Shape of the Neuron in Schizophrenia

The Shape of the Neuron in Schizophrenia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Schizophrenia is defined by its core symptomatology, which includes thought disorder, psychosis (including delusions, hallucinations, and paranoia), and negative symptoms, the latter which include ...
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Cooperation shapes abilities of the human brain

Cooperation shapes abilities of the human brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Chimpanzees are regarded as more intelligent than marmosets. Yet, like humans, it is marmosets that will often come to the aid of their fellow group members, even unprompted.
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How nerve cells communicate with each other over long distances: Travelling by resonance

How nerve cells communicate with each other over long distances: Travelling by resonance | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
How nerve cells within the brain communicate with each other over long distances has puzzled scientists for decades.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Social Affective Neuroscience
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The nose knows: How to pick your friends

The nose knows: How to pick your friends | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
We all have that friend. Let's call her Jane. Jane is bubbly and
gregarious. Jane doesn't attend a party, she manifests it. She seeks out
social gatherings and is enlivened by human presence. Jane is a good
listener and has many trusted friends. What can explain Jane's
extroversion? The answer, astonishingly, is her attraction to human body
odor. 

Via Teodora Stoica
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We feel, therefore we learn: The neuroscience of social emotion. Daniel Siegel - YouTube

Presenting at the Mind and its Potential conference, Dr Daniel Siegel MD speaks about Interpersonal Neurobiology, an interdisciplinary view of life experienc...

Via VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG, Teodora Stoica
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Talking to Strangers Makes You Happy

Talking to Strangers Makes You Happy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People who had to strike up conversations on a subway later reported feeling happier than those who didn’t. Christie Nicholson reports.
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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DARPA’s tiny implants will hook directly into your nervous system, treat diseases and depression without medication | ExtremeTech

DARPA’s tiny implants will hook directly into your nervous system, treat diseases and depression without medication | ExtremeTech | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

DARPA, on the back of the US government's BRAIN program, has begun the development of tiny electronic implants that interface directly with your nervous system and can directly control and regulate many different diseases and chronic conditions,...


Via LeapMind
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