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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Small molecules researched for the regeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease

Small molecules researched for the regeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers in the University of Helsinki plan to develop orally administrable small molecules that act similarly to neurotrophic factor GDNF.
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Introduction to unique and powerful features of schema therapy 5.m2ts

A brief overview of unique aspects of schema therapy that make it exceptionally effective in the treatment of long standing emotional difficulties that have ...

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Anti-inflammatory drugs may be used for treatment of depression: researchers

Anti-inflammatory drugs may be used for treatment of depression: researchers | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists at seven UK universities are to set up a research consortium aimed at exploiting a newly discovered link between immune disorders and mental illness.
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A Standard for Neuroscience Data

A Standard for Neuroscience Data | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new computational framework for standardizing neuroscience data on a global level has been developed by researchers.
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Serotonin Neuron Subtypes

Serotonin Neuron Subtypes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research into serotonin neuron subtypes could help in better understanding of SIDS and depression treatments.
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A clear, molecular view of the evolution of human color vision

A clear, molecular view of the evolution of human color vision | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Many genetic mutations in visual pigments, spread over millions of years, were required for humans to evolve from a primitive mammal with a dim, shadowy view of the world into a greater ape able to see all the colors in a rainbow.
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Scientists Unveil the Secrets of Visual Attention - Scientific American

Scientists Unveil the Secrets of Visual Attention - Scientific American | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Concentration affects how we detect and perceive objects and scenes
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“We are beginning to understand how cognition works”: Double interview with John O’Keefe and Edvard Moser

“We are beginning to understand how cognition works”: Double interview with John O’Keefe and Edvard Moser | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Two 2014 Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine about childhood, dream jobs and the next big thing in neuroscience. What is your earliest memory as a child? John O’Keefe: That’s a very good question. I do remember a few things from the age of about three years old, when I interacted with some of my […]
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Bugs Life: The Nerve Cells That Make Locusts “Gang Up”

Bugs Life: The Nerve Cells That Make Locusts “Gang Up” | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research demonstrates the importance of individual history in understanding how neurochemicals control behavior.
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Stunning Images from the 2014 Olympus BioScapes International Digital Imaging Competition

Stunning Images from the 2014 Olympus BioScapes International Digital Imaging Competition | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Microscopes find beauty in the most unexpected places
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'The Future of the Brain': A Time Capsule of Neuroscience

'The Future of the Brain': A Time Capsule of Neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
We may finally be getting on the right track to figuring out how the brain works. In a new collection of essays, top neuroscientists write about the advanced technologies that might get us there.
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Drugs used for impotence could treat vascular dementia?

Drugs used for impotence could treat vascular dementia? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists are to explore whether drugs usually used to treat erectile problems by expanding blood vessels could become the next major way to tackle the dementia epidemic.
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How Stress Changes The Brain

How Stress Changes The Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

“We tend to think of stress as an immediate problem: The boss hovering over our desks; the mad dash to the subway at the end of a long day. And in the short-term, stress makes us feel irritable, anxious, tense, distracted and forgetful.”


Via Luis Valdes, Corina Dobre
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Compassion Training Alters Altruism and Neural Responses to Suffering | Psychological Science

Compassion Training Alters Altruism and Neural Responses to Suffering | Psychological Science | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT: Compassion is a key motivator of altruistic behavior, but little is known about individuals’ capacity to cultivate compassion through training. We examined whether compassion may be systematically trained by testing whether (a) short-term compassion training increases altruistic behavior and (b) individual differences in altruism are associated with training-induced changes in neural responses to suffering. In healthy adults, we found that compassion training increased altruistic redistribution of funds to a victim encountered outside of the training context. Furthermore, increased altruistic behavior after compassion training was associated with altered activation in brain regions implicated in social cognition and emotion regulation, including the inferior parietal cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and in DLPFC connectivity with the nucleus accumbens. These results suggest that compassion can be cultivated with training and that greater altruistic behavior may emerge from increased engagement of neural systems implicated in understanding the suffering of other people, executive and emotional control, and reward processing.

 

Weng, H.Y. et al. (in press). Compassion training alters altruism and neural responses to suffering. Psychological Science. doi: 10.1177/0956797612469537

 

Picture credit: Doug Savage, Savage Chickens.


Via Eileen Cardillo, Corina Dobre
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Eileen Cardillo's curator insight, May 23, 2013 6:51 AM

University of Wisconsin-Madison does more standards-setting work. Most notably, they used an active control group of comparable quality and rigor and in their analyses linked behavior outside the scanner to neural activity during a different task. Bonus: the lead author, Helen Weng, is a graduate student.

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Genetic predisposition for enjoyment of amphetamine's effects found to reduce risk of schizophrenia, ADHD | UChicago News

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A Rumor of Empathy...in Psychology (the movie)

A Rumor of Empathy...in Psychology (the movie) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

This educational video explores empathy in the listening and speaking of the community of psychologists, psychotherapists, and those committed to emotional and human well-being.

 

That about covers it. Where is empathy present and where is it missing? Should one expect the therapist to cry with you if the trauma is really, really sad? What if she or he does cry anyway? How does this relate to music therapy? Neurology? Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)? How does empathy relate to the “circle of caring”? All these questions and more are engaged. Not to be missed!

 

Note: All the usual disclaimers apply. This is a good faith, best effort to expand empathy in the world by capturing the experiences and narrative of a significant individual for educational purposes.

 

(c) Lou Agosta, The Chicago Empathy Project


Via Edwin Rutsch, Emre Erdogan
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Lost Memories Might Be Able to Be Restored, Researchers Report

Lost Memories Might Be Able to Be Restored, Researchers Report | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study reports long term memories might not be stored in synapses, as was previously thought.
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Brain structures devoted to learning and memory are highly conserved in the animal kingdom

Brain structures devoted to learning and memory are highly conserved in the animal kingdom | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Whether you’re cramming for an exam or just trying to remember where you put your car keys, learning and memory are critical functions that we constantly employ in daily life.
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Discovery of novel drug target may lead to better treatment for schizophrenia

Discovery of novel drug target may lead to better treatment for schizophrenia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) have identified a novel drug target that could lead to the development of better antipsychotic medications. Dr.
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Women are better than men at empathy, and here’s the proof

Women are better than men at empathy, and here’s the proof | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
WE ALL know the stereotype: women are better at empathy than men. Now Queensland scientists reckon they’ve proved it.

After pooling data from thousands of in-depth interviews with Australians, they found women were far more likely to feel their partner’s emotional pain than men.

When a negative event befalls their partner, women tend to experience an emotional effect roughly 24 per cent as large as if the event happened to themselves, they found.


We looked at people who had negative shocks in their lives, such as the death of a friend, losing a job or becoming ill,” said Professor Paul Frijters of University of Queensland, who conducted the study with Dr Cindy Mervin of Griffith University.



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Dementia is third most common cause of death in UK, research finds

Dementia is third most common cause of death in UK, research finds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Alzheimer’s Research UK says increased life expectancy means age-related disease is becoming ‘our greatest medical challenge’Deaths from dementia have risen by 52% since 1990 and the disease is now the third most common cause of death in the UK, a...
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Dazzling Images of the Brain Created by Neuroscientist-Artist

Dazzling Images of the Brain Created by Neuroscientist-Artist | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain has been called the most complex structure in the universe, but it may also be the most beautiful. One artist's work captures both the aesthetics and sophistication of this most enigmatic organ.
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2004 - The Empathy Quotient. an Investigation of Adults With Asperger Syndrome or High Functioning Autism, And Normal Sex Differences

Artículo Asperger Cociente Empatía

Via Edwin Rutsch
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