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PLOS ONE: The Relationship between Self-Awareness of Attentional Status, Behavioral Performance and Oscillatory Brain Rhythms

PLOS ONE: The Relationship between Self-Awareness of Attentional Status, Behavioral Performance and Oscillatory Brain Rhythms | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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A Life-Changing, True Story Reveals the Secret to Success

A Life-Changing, True Story Reveals the Secret to Success | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The amazing story of Phineas Gage sheds light on how your brain achieves.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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One Small Thing That Makes You More Trustworthy, Attractive, and Intelligent

One Small Thing That Makes You More Trustworthy, Attractive, and Intelligent | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A recent study by French scientists shows there’s one simple thing we can do to increase our apparent trustworthiness. And, as a bonus, we’ll seem more attractive and intelligent, too.
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Study finds antidepressants affect morality and decision-making

Study finds antidepressants affect morality and decision-making | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Healthy people who are given commonly prescribed mood-altering drugs see significant changes in the degree to which they are willing to tolerate harm against themselves and others, according to a study published Thursday.
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Brain folding related to surface area and thickness, not number of neurons

Brain folding related to surface area and thickness, not number of neurons | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—A pair of researchers with Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro has found that the degree of folding of mammalian brains follows a simple mathematical relationship.
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Imaging the earliest Old World monkey brain {Duke University Research}

The brain hidden inside the oldest known Old World monkey skull has been visualized for the first time. The ancient monkey, known as Victoriapithecus, first ...
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Making waves with groundbreaking brain research

Making waves with groundbreaking brain research | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research by Jason Gallivan and Randy Flanagan suggests that when deciding which of several possible actions to perform, the human brain plans multiple actions simultaneously prior to selecting one of them to execute.
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Research reveals how the human brain might reconstruct past events

Research reveals how the human brain might reconstruct past events | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When remembering something from our past, we often vividly re-experience the whole episode in which it occurred. New UCL research funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust has now revealed how this might happen in the brain.
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Hearing words, writing sounds: examining the author's brain

Hearing words, writing sounds: examining the author's brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Kamila Shamsie always revises her work by reading aloud, but AS Byatt looks for the rhythms of the page. Richard Lea goes in search of what happens in the brain when we write and read fiction

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Cortisol Reinforces Traumatic Memories

Cortisol Reinforces Traumatic Memories | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
According to a new study, cortisol strengthens traumatic memories, both when the memory is formed and when it is reconsolidated.

 

"It had been shown that the stress hormone cortisol has a strengthening impact on the consolidation of memories, i.e. the several-hour process in the course of which a memory is formed immediately after the experience. Image is for illustrative purposes only. Image credit: Ben Mills."


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Smile and the World Smiles With You

According to a new study, smiling changes the way our brains process other people's emotions.
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Scientists identify a calcium channel essential for deep sleep

Scientists identify a calcium channel essential for deep sleep | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Sleep seems simple enough, a state of rest and restoration that almost every vertebrate creature must enter regularly in order to survive.
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Methadone linked to initial QTc prolongation in chronic pain

Methadone linked to initial QTc prolongation in chronic pain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(HealthDay)—For patients with chronic pain, methadone is associated with a small, but nonsignificant, initial increase in QTc, which does not persist, according to a study published in the June issue of Pain Medicine.
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Long-acting antipsychotic medication may improve treatment for schizophrenia

Long-acting antipsychotic medication may improve treatment for schizophrenia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Schizophrenia, which affects 2 million to 3 million people in the U.S., causes hallucinations, delusions and disorganization.
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Scientists observe altruism and selfishness in brain activity

Scientists observe altruism and selfishness in brain activity | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Prosocial behavior is fundamental to the sustainability of society, enabling people to work in groups, to create larger and more successful social structures, and to contribute to the common welfare. However, despite the importance of altruism, science has only a limited understanding of how prosocial behaviors and selfish behaviors are represented in the brain. Additionally, individual transition between self-benefiting behavior and altruistic behavior is not well understood.

Via Ashish Umre
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Memory Specificity and Mindfulness Jointly Moderate the Effect of Reflective Pondering on Depressive Symptoms in Individuals With a History of Recurrent Depression

Memory Specificity and Mindfulness Jointly Moderate the Effect of Reflective Pondering on Depressive Symptoms in Individuals With a History of Recurrent Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

(Available in free full text) In previously depressed individuals, reflective thinking may easily get derailed and lead to detrimental effects. This study investigated the conditions in which such thinking is, or is not, adaptive. Levels of mindfulness and autobiographical memory specificity were assessed as potential moderators of the relationship between reflective thinking and depressive symptoms. Two hundred seventy-four individuals with a history of three or more previous episodes of depression completed self-report measures of depressive symptoms, rumination—including subscales for reflection and brooding—and mindfulness, as well as an autobiographical memory task to assess memory specificity. In those low in both mindfulness and memory specificity, higher levels of reflection were related to more depressive symptoms, whereas in all other groups higher levels of reflection were related to fewer depressive symptoms. The results demonstrate that the relation between reflective pondering and depressive symptoms varies depending on individual state or trait factors. In previously depressed individuals, the cognitive problem-solving aspect of reflection may be easily hampered when tendencies toward unspecific processing are increased, and awareness of mental processes such as self-judgment and reactivity is decreased.


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Dr James Hawkins's curator insight, July 4, 7:06 PM

Very interesting ...

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Old World monkey had tiny, complex brain

Old World monkey had tiny, complex brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain hidden inside the oldest known Old World monkey skull has been visualized for the first time. The creature's tiny but remarkably wrinkled brain supports the idea that brain complexity can evolve before brain size in the primate family tree.
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Survival of the fittest: How brain tumors adapt through complex ecosystems

Survival of the fittest: How brain tumors adapt through complex ecosystems | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Despite advances in medical technology and a constantly evolving understanding of the mechanisms of cancer progression, researchers and clinicians are faced with a litany of challenges along the road to finding a cure for the most aggressive forms...
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Hope for Alzheimer's treatment as researchers find licensed drugs halt brain degeneration

Hope for Alzheimer's treatment as researchers find licensed drugs halt brain degeneration | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Studies on mice show two existing medicines could help restore protein production in brain and prevent memory loss, speeding up search for cure
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Researchers show how our sense of smell evolved, including in cave men

Researchers show how our sense of smell evolved, including in cave men | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A group of scientists led by Dr Kara Hoover of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and including Professor Matthew Cobb of The University of Manchester, has studied how our sense of smell has evolved, and has even reconstructed how a long-extinct...
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Commonly prescribed drugs affect decisions to harm oneself and others

Commonly prescribed drugs affect decisions to harm oneself and others | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Healthy people given the serotonin-enhancing antidepressant citalopram were willing to pay almost twice as much to prevent harm to themselves or others than those given placebo drugs in a moral decision-making experiment at UCL.
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Long-Term Memories Are Maintained by Prion-Like Proteins

Long-Term Memories Are Maintained by Prion-Like Proteins | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Research from Eric Kandel’s lab has uncovered further evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time.

 

"Memories are stored for the long-term with the help of prion-like proteins called CPEB. CPEB prions aggregate and maintain synapses that recorded the memory [“spines” in the bottom image]. When CPEB prions are not present or are inactivated, the synapses collapse and the memory fades [see upper image]."


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Energy for Visual Processing Provided by Microtubules in Retinal Neurons

Researchers have identified a thick band of microtubules within retinal neurons which help provide the energy required for visual processing.
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As a music therapist I can give people back the power to communicate

As a music therapist I can give people back the power to communicate | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Regular sessions can help reduce anxiety among people with mental health conditions such as depression and dementia On a weekday, it’s normally an early start; responding to urgent emails before heading to my office at the music therapy research...

Via marsdentherapy
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Brain Cells Protected From Age Damage With Help of Common Protein

MACKS, a common protein, could help to protect the brain from age related damage.
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Alzheimer’s disease works differently in patients with and without Down syndrome

Alzheimer’s disease works differently in patients with and without Down syndrome | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of Kentucky’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging have completed a study that revealed differences in the way brain inflammation — considered a key component of AD– is expressed in different subsets of patients, in...
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