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Patricia Churchland: Making Waves - Dana Foundation

Patricia Churchland: Making Waves - Dana Foundation | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
 By incorporating neuroscience into philosophy, Patricia Churchland has undermined several staples of Philosophy 101.

The thinking of Descartes, for example, who believed the soul was responsible for all mental functions, has been rendered quaint by research showing that the self—whatever it is—clearly emerges from the physical brain. Churchland’s most recent book,Touching a Nerve, is subtitled The Self as Brain, and visits some of the evidence that all of our emotions, thoughts, memories, and behavior spring from neural activity and nothing but—no soul required.

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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Researchers discover new genetic brain disorder in humans

Researchers discover new genetic brain disorder in humans | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A newly identified genetic disorder associated with degeneration of the central and peripheral nervous systems in humans, along with the genetic cause, is reported in the April 24, 2014 issue of Cell.
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How to Remember Like a Pro

How to Remember Like a Pro | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Step into your "Memory Palace." (How to Remember Like a Pro | Psychology Today http://t.co/uvOtvuQuiT)
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Researchers Build New "Off Switch" to Shut Down Neural Activity

Researchers Build New "Off Switch" to Shut Down Neural Activity | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) scientists have used an analysis of channelrhodopsin's molecular structure to guide a series of genetic mutations to the ion channel that grant the power to silence neurons with an unprecedented level of...
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Higher Education Associated With Better Recovery From Traumatic Brain Injury

Higher Education Associated With Better Recovery From Traumatic Brain Injury | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Better-educated people appear to be significantly more likely to recover from a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), suggesting that a brain’s “cognitive reserve” may play a role in helping people get back to their previous lives, new Johns Hopkins research shows.

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Bionic Ears Boosted by Gene Therapy and Regrown Nerves

Bionic Ears Boosted by Gene Therapy and Regrown Nerves | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The performance of cochlear implants has been improved with the use of gene therapy, suggesting a new avenue for developing better hearing aids
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists identify critical new protein complex involved in learning and memory

Scientists identify critical new protein complex involved in learning and memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a protein complex that plays a critical but previously unknown role in learning and memory formation.
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Pain curbs sex drive in female mice, but not in males

Pain curbs sex drive in female mice, but not in males | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
“Not tonight, dear, I have a headache.” Generally speaking, that line is attributed to the wife in a couple, implying that women’s sexual desire is more affected by pain than men’s.
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Neuroimaging Technique: Live from inside the cell in real-time

Neuroimaging Technique: Live from inside the cell in real-time | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A novel imaging technique provides insights into the role of redox signaling and reactive oxygen species in living neurons, in real time. Scientists have developed a new optical microscopy technique to unravel the role of 'oxidative stress' in healthy as well as injured nervous systems.
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Scientists Identify Critical New Protein Complex Involved in Learning and Memory

Scientists Identify Critical New Protein Complex Involved in Learning and Memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have identified a protein complex that plays a critical, but previously unknown, role in memory and learning.
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Green tea extract boosts your brain power, especially the working memory, new research shows

Green tea extract boosts your brain power, especially the working memory, new research shows | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Green tea is said to have many putative positive effects on health. Now, researchers are reporting first evidence that green tea extract enhances the cognitive functions, in particular the working memory. The findings suggest promising clinical implications for the treatment of cognitive impairments in psychiatric disorders such as dementia.
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Brainy beverage: Study reveals how green tea boosts brain cell production to aid memory

Brainy beverage: Study reveals how green tea boosts brain cell production to aid memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
It has long been believed that drinking green tea is good for the memory. Now researchers have discovered how the chemical properties of China's favorite drink affect the generation of brain cells, providing benefits for memory and spatial learning.
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Narrowing of Neck Artery Without Warning May Signal Memory and Thinking Decline

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that narrowing of the carotid artery in the neck without any symptoms may be linked to problems in learning, memory, thinking and decision-making, compared to people with similar risk factors but...
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Research Symposium 2014

Research Symposium 2014 | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The Third Annual Roots of Empathy Research Symposium (May 7-9, 2014) promises to be yet another thought-provoking gathering in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.


The symposium will offer rich interdisciplinary presentations from expert research scientists on topics such as development of executive function skills, neurophysiological foundations of emotions, attachment, and self-regulation, neuroendocrinology and social behaviour, the psychology,neuroscience, and ethics of empathy, and social and emotional learning in the early years.


=====================

We value the lens of research as

we continue to offer our empathy-based

programs to children on three continents

============


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Study finds physical signs of depression common among ICU survivors

Study finds physical signs of depression common among ICU survivors | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Depression affects more than one out of three survivors of critical illness, according to a Vanderbilt study released in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, and the majority of patients experience their symptoms physically rather than mentally.
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The Psychology of Social: Are We Hardwired to Use Social Media?

The Psychology of Social: Are We Hardwired to Use Social Media? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Man is by nature a social animal; an individual who is unsocial naturally and not accidentally is either beneath our notice or more than human. Society is something that precedes the individual. An...
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Less myelin in higher regions of the cerebral cortext may allow emergence of highly complex neuronal behaviors

Less myelin in higher regions of the cerebral cortext may allow emergence of highly complex neuronal behaviors | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The higher you look in the cerebral cortex, the less myelin you'll find. Myelin, the electrical insulating material in the body long known to be essential for the fast transmission of impulses along the axons of nerve cells, is not as ubiquitous as thought, according to new work led by Professor Paola Arlotta of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) and the University’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, in collaboration with Professor Jeff Lichtman of Harvard’s Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.


“Myelin is a relatively recent invention during evolution,” says Arlotta. “It’s thought that myelin allowed the brain to communicate really fast to the far reaches of the body, and that it has endowed the brain with the capacity to compute higher-level functions.”


In fact, loss of myelin is a feature in a number of devastating diseases, including multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia. But the new research shows that despite myelin’s essential roles in the brain, “some of the most evolved, most complex neurons of the nervous system have less myelin than older, more ancestral ones,” said Arlotta, co-director of the HSCI neuroscience program.


She said the higher one looks in the cerebral cortex — closer to the top of the brain, which is its most evolved part — the less myelin one finds.  Not only that, but “neurons in this part of the brain display a brand-new way of positioning myelin along their axons that has not been previously seen. They have ‘intermittent myelin’ with long axon tracts that lack myelin interspersed among myelin-rich segments.”


“Contrary to the common assumptions that neurons use a universal profile of myelin distribution on their axons, the work indicates that different neurons choose to myelinate their axons differently,” Arlotta said.


“In classic neurobiology textbooks, myelin is represented on axons as a sequence of myelinated segments separated by very short nodes that lack myelin. This distribution of myelin was tacitly assumed to be always the same, on every neuron, from the beginning to the end of the axon. This new work finds this not to be the case.”


The results of the research by Arlotta and postdoctoral fellow Giulio Srubek Tomassy, the first author on the report, are published in the latest edition of the journal Science.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Loss of memory in Alzheimer's mice models reversed through gene therapy

Loss of memory in Alzheimer's mice models reversed through gene therapy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia and affects some 400,000 people in Spain alone. However, no effective cure has yet been found. One of the reasons for this is the lack of knowledge about the cellular mechanisms which cause alterations in nerve transmissions and the loss of memory ...

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Rebuilding Memories Makes Them Stick

Rebuilding Memories Makes Them Stick | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Even after his death, the famous amnesic H. M. is revolutionizing our understanding of how memory works and how we maintain it as we age
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Depressed? Researchers identify new anti-depressant mechanisms

Depressed? Researchers identify new anti-depressant mechanisms | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are making breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression.
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Neuroscientists discover brain circuits involved in emotion

Neuroscientists discover brain circuits involved in emotion | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists have discovered a brain pathway that underlies the emotional behaviours critical for survival.
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Newly-Approved Brain Stimulator Offers Hope for Individuals With Uncontrolled Epilepsy

A recently FDA-approved device has been shown to reduce seizures in patients with medication-resistant epilepsy by as much as 50 percent. When coupled with an innovative electrode placement planning system developed by physicians at Rush, the device facilitated the complete elimination of seizures in nearly half of the implanted Rush patients enrolled in the decade-long clinical trials.

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Language Moves Your Inner Dancer

Language Moves Your Inner Dancer | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
There are deep, surprising connections between words and the brain’s sense of motion through space
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Green tea extract enhances parieto-frontal connectivity during working memory processing - Springer

It has been proposed that green tea extract may have a beneficial impact on cognitive functioning, suggesting promising clinical implications. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this putative cognitive enhancing effect of green tea extract still remain unknown.
Objectives
This study investigates whether the intake of green tea extract modulates effective brain connectivity during working memory processing and whether connectivity parameters are related to task performance.
 
Results
Green tea extract increased the working memory induced modulation of connectivity from the right superior parietal lobule to the middle frontal gyrus. Notably, the magnitude of green tea induced increase in parieto-frontal connectivity positively correlated with improvement in task performance.
Conclusions
Our findings provide first evidence for the putative beneficial effect of green tea on cognitive functioning, in particular, on working memory processing at the neural system level by suggesting changes in short-term plasticity of parieto-frontal brain connections. Modeling effective connectivity among frontal and parietal brain regions during working memory processing might help to assess the efficacy of green tea for the treatment of cognitive impairments in psychiatric disorders such as dementia.
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What you see is where you go: Fruit fly visual interneurons may compute temporal integration of visual motion

What you see is where you go: Fruit fly visual interneurons may compute temporal integration of visual motion | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a model organism (a non-human species that is extensively studied to understand particular biological phenomena) studied in a wide range of laboratory experiments for several reasons,...
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Want to Quit Smoking? New Study Says Try "Self-Expanding" Activities

Want to Quit Smoking? New Study Says Try "Self-Expanding" Activities | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
If you are trying to quit smoking one method to incorporate is to do new, exciting "self-expanding" activities that can help with nicotine craving. This is the take-home message from a new study published online in PLOS ONE.
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