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Individuals Genetically Predisposed to Anxiousness May Be Less Likely to Volunteer and Help Others

Individuals Genetically Predisposed to Anxiousness May Be Less Likely to Volunteer and Help Others | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
I’ve always known, from my own experience with depression, that there is a strong connection between volunteer work and mental health.
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Warped Brain Lobes Could Underlie Depression Symptoms

Warped Brain Lobes Could Underlie Depression Symptoms | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Wraparound occipital lobes found to be highly common in depression
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists map brains of the blind to solve mysteries of human brain specialization

Scientists map brains of the blind to solve mysteries of human brain specialization | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Studying the brain activity of blind people, scientists are challenging the standard view of how the human brain specializes to perform different kinds of tasks, and shedding new light on how our brains can adapt to the rapid cultural and...
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Contemplative Neuroscience
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The Mindfulness and Compassion | The Art and Science of Contemplative Practice

The Mindfulness and Compassion | The Art and Science of Contemplative Practice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Second Int. Conference on Mindfulness

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Dave Vago's curator insight, January 23, 12:09 PM

Looks like a great group - should be fun

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Vernon B. Mountcastle, Brain Explorer, Dies at 96

Vernon B. Mountcastle, Brain Explorer, Dies at 96 | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
At the dawn of modern neuroscience, Dr. Mountcastle showed how cylinders of neurons, dedicated to specific tasks, work together to process perception.
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How the Brain Stores Trivial Memories, Just in Case

How the Brain Stores Trivial Memories, Just in Case | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The new research suggests that human memory keeps sights, sounds and observations in cold storage for a time in case they become useful later on.
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Study identifies part of brain key to controlling attention

Study identifies part of brain key to controlling attention | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
For the first time, researchers have convincingly identified an ensemble of neurons in the brain that is crucial to focusing attention and ignoring distractions.
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Eight genes that make us brainiacs

Eight genes that make us brainiacs | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Study identifies DNA that boosts size of memory and motor control centers in brain


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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and HealthCare
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Oxytocin Improves Empathy in Frontotemporal Dementia

Oxytocin Improves Empathy in Frontotemporal Dementia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Intranasal administration of oxytocin twice daily for 1 week was safe and well tolerated and showed preliminary signs of improvement in symptoms of apathy and loss of empathy in patients with frontotemporal dementia, according to a new study.


The study, published in the January 13 issue of Neurology, was led by Elizabeth C. Finger, MD, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada


Dr. Finger explained to Medscape Medical News that frontotemporal dementia is the second most common cause of presenile dementia. "It typically starts in the 50s or 60s and appears to have a different pathology to Alzheimer's, with loss of empathy being the hallmark symptom in the most common subtype — known as behavioral variant."


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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Social Foraging
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Memory and burstiness in dynamic networks

We introduce a class of complex network models which evolve through the addition of edges between nodes selected randomly according to their intrinsic fitness, and the deletion of edges according to their age. We add to this a memory effect where the attractiveness of a node is increased by the number of edges it is currently attached to, and observe that this creates burst-like activity in the attachment events of each individual node which is characterised by a power-law distribution of inter-event times. The fitness of each node depends on the probability distribution from which it is drawn; we find exact solutions for the expectation of the degree distribution for a variety of possible fitness distributions, and for both cases where the memory effect either is, or is not present. This work can potentially lead to methods to uncover hidden fitness distributions from fast changing, temporal network data such as online social communications and fMRI scans.

Via Ashish Umre
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Researchers find a novel signaling pathway involved in appetite control

Researchers find a novel signaling pathway involved in appetite control | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study has revealed important details of a molecular signaling system in the brain that is involved in the control of body weight and metabolism.
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Expanding Brain Samples to Better See Them

Expanding Brain Samples to Better See Them | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have found a way to enlarge and map brain samples. This inexpensive technique will now allow scientists to get a much closer look at the human brian and perhaps figure out some of its long standing secrets.
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During Deep Sleep, Your Brain Cycles Up And Down, A Balance Between Excitement And Inhibition

When idle, the brain cycles up and down between a state of excitement and inhibition, with each of five separate neurons uniquely contributing to these modulations.
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A wireless neural recording system with a precision motorized microdrive for freely behaving animals

A wireless neural recording system with a precision motorized microdrive for freely behaving animals | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain is composed of many different types of neurons. Therefore, analysis of brain activity with single-cell resolution could provide fundamental insights into brain mechanisms. However, the electrical signal of an individual neuron is very small, and precise isolation of single neuronal activity from moving subjects is still challenging. To measure single-unit signals in actively behaving states, establishment of technologies that enable fine control of electrode positioning and strict spike sorting is essential. To further apply such a single-cell recording approach to small brain areas in naturally behaving animals in large spaces or during social interaction, we developed a compact wireless recording system with a motorized microdrive. Wireless control of electrode placement facilitates the exploration of single neuronal activity without affecting animal behaviors. Because the system is equipped with a newly developed data-encoding program, the recorded data are readily compressed almost to theoretical limits and securely transmitted to a host computer. Brain activity can thereby be stably monitored in real time and further analyzed using online or offline spike sorting. Our wireless recording approach using a precision motorized microdrive will become a powerful tool for studying brain mechanisms underlying natural or social behaviors.

Via Ashish Umre
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Limitless learning Universe
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Blood Work: Scientists Uncover Surprising New Tools to Rejuvenate the Brain | ucsf.edu

Blood Work: Scientists Uncover Surprising New Tools to Rejuvenate the Brain | ucsf.edu | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
RT @UCSF: Interested in #aging/longevity #science? Join our @reddit r/Science AMA on 1/28. Background: http://t.co/YuiMltlnvo http://t.co/v…;

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The brain's electrical alphabet

The brain's electrical alphabet | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain's alphabet is a mix of rate and precise timing of electrical pulses: the observation was made by researchers at the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste and the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT) of Rovereto,...
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from LeadershipABC
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The Neuroscience Of Being A Good Leader

The Neuroscience Of Being A Good Leader | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Find out why it's important for leaders to understand how people feel about the freedom they have and their relationships at work.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Charlotte Hitchcock's curator insight, January 24, 4:11 AM

Excellent article. More managers need to be aware of the negative impact of "micromanaging "  on their teams

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Expansion Microscopy Stretches Limits of Conventional Microscopes

Expansion Microscopy Stretches Limits of Conventional Microscopes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new technique makes minute biological features, some just 70 nanometers wide, more visible through regular optical microscopes.
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Could an insulin nasal spray help treat Alzheimer's?

Could an insulin nasal spray help treat Alzheimer's? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A manufactured form of long-acting insulin - delivered nasally - has been shown to improve working memory in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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Men and Women Process Emotions in Different Ways: This Affects What They Remember — PsyBlog

Men and Women Process Emotions in Different Ways: This Affects What They Remember — PsyBlog | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Study of 3,000+ finds men and women process emotions differently and this affects what they remember. 

Women rate emotional images as more stimulating and are more likely to remember them than men, a new study finds.

While strong emotions tend to boost memory for both men and women, this neuroimaging study may help explain why women often outperform men on memory tests.

The results come from a very large study of 3,398 people who took part in four different trials.

Both men and women were asked to look at a series of pictures, some of which were emotionally arousing and others which were neutral.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, January 23, 8:16 AM

The results, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, showed that women found the emotional pictures — and especially the negative pictures — more stimulating than the men...

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and HealthCare
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Study: Therapeutic empathy and recovery from depression in cognitive-behavioral therapy: a structural equation model

Study: Therapeutic empathy and recovery from depression in cognitive-behavioral therapy: a structural equation model | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
This study demonstrated that therapeutic empathy has a moderate-to-large causal effect on recovery from depression in a group of 185 patients treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT).


The authors simultaneously estimated the reciprocal effect of depression severity on therapeutic empathy and found that this effect was quite small. In addition, homework compliance had a separate effect on clinical recovery, over and above the effect of therapeutic empathy.


The patients of novice therapists improved significantly less than did the patients of more experienced therapists, when controlling for therapeutic empathy and homework compliance. Ss who terminated therapy prematurely were less likely to complete the self-help assignments between sessions, rated their therapists as significantly less empathic, and improved significantly less.


Ss with borderline personality disorder improved significantly less, but they rated their therapists as just as empathic and caring as other patients. The significance of these findings for psychotherapy research, treatment, and clinical training is discussed.


image http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depression_(mood)


Via Edwin Rutsch
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An Electrode in the Brain Turns Off Depression

An Electrode in the Brain Turns Off Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Electrical stimulation deep within the brain may alleviate devastating mood disorders
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Men and women process emotions differently, brain study shows

Men and women process emotions differently, brain study shows | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Women rate emotional images as more emotionally stimulating than men do and are more likely to remember them. However, there are no gender-related differences in emotional appraisal as far as neutral images are concerned.
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Secrets of Neandertal Cognition Revealed

Secrets of Neandertal Cognition Revealed | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Analyses of anatomy, DNA and cultural remains have yielded tantalizing insights into the inner lives of our mysterious extinct cousins
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Neuroscience Proves What We’ve Known All Along: Gender Exists On A Spectrum

Neuroscience Proves What We’ve Known All Along: Gender Exists On A Spectrum | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study reveals evidence of a neurological distinction between gender identity and biological sex.
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By Amanda Koehn
Ever wonder about the brain’s white matter microstructure diffusivity? Don’t know what the hell we’re talking about?
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Reputation drives cooperative behaviour and network formation in human groups

Reputation drives cooperative behaviour and network formation in human groups | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Cooperativeness is a defining feature of human nature. Theoreticians have suggested several mechanisms to explain this ubiquitous phenomenon, including reciprocity, reputation, and punishment, but the problem is still unsolved. Here we show, through experiments conducted with groups of people playing an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma on a dynamic network, that it is reputation what really fosters cooperation. While this mechanism has already been observed in unstructured populations, we find that it acts equally when interactions are given by a network that players can reconfigure dynamically. Furthermore, our observations reveal that memory also drives the network formation process, and cooperators assort more, with longer link lifetimes, the longer the past actions record. Our analysis demonstrates, for the first time, that reputation can be very well quantified as a weighted mean of the fractions of past cooperative acts and the last action performed. This finding has potential applications in collaborative systems and e-commerce.

Via Ashish Umre
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