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Study: TV, Movies Can Inspire Altruism

Study: TV, Movies Can Inspire Altruism | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
But new research suggests it only occurs when people reflect upon what they’ve been watching.
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Behavioral Science

This is "Behavioral Science" by Behavioral Science Lab on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

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New Clues About a Brain Protein with High Affinity for Valium

New Clues About a Brain Protein with High Affinity for Valium | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Valium, one of the best known antianxiety drugs, produces its calming effects by binding with a particular protein in the brain. But the drug has an almost equally strong affinity for a completely different protein.
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Eyes, ears and nose may aid Alzheimer's disease prevention and treatment

Eyes, ears and nose may aid Alzheimer's disease prevention and treatment | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Detecting a decline in certain sensory functions may become the future of preventing Alzheimer's disease (AD), with research showing smell testing and retinal imaging to be strong predictors of dementia risk.
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Minor head hits can chip away at a football player’s brain — even when there’s no concussion, research suggests

Minor head hits can chip away at a football player’s brain — even when there’s no concussion, research suggests | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Thanks to a string of new and quite disturbing studies (including one I reported on earlier this year), neuroscientists are finally beginning to get their message through the (thick?) skulls of football, hockey, soccer and other contact sports enthus
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Complex environments push 'brain' evolution

Complex environments push 'brain' evolution | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Little animations trying to master a computer game are teaching neuroscience researchers how the brain evolves when faced with difficult tasks.
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Scientists may have found the part of the brain that enables lucid dreaming

Scientists may have found the part of the brain that enables lucid dreaming | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A few people in the world are able to "wake up" in their dreams, retaining their lucidity and even exploring the dream world. According to a new study, all these people may have one thing in common - a neurological ability.
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Empathy: A motivated account

Empathy: A motivated account | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

We often think of empathy as an automatic process. However, empathy is often context-dependent. Our willingness to empathize with others changes with different situations and with different people.A new paper by Jamil Zaki resolves this tension by underscoring the role of motivation in empathy. Motives drive our willingness to empathize. In his paper, Zaki highlights specific motives that drive people to avoid and approach empathy, illustrates a motivated model of empathy, and suggests potential interventions to maximize empathy.For a complete list of SSNL publications, click here


file:///C:/All%20Temp/Downloads/zaki2014_motivatedEmpathy%20(1).pdf



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Gene linked to long life also protects against mental decline in old age

Gene linked to long life also protects against mental decline in old age | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Discovery gives scientists hope of developing a therapy that could slowdown the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia People who carry a mutated gene linked to longer lifespan have extra tissue in part of the brain that...
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Monkeys' amygdala neurons are important in guiding behaviour toward internally generated distant goals

Nature Neuroscience | doi:10.1038/nn.3925

 

Working with monkeys, researchers conclude that "neuronal planning activity in the amygdala suggests that this structure is important in guiding behaviour toward internally generated, distant goals."


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Appraisal of stressful or threatening situations by the brain

Appraisal of stressful or threatening situations by the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Research Center Translational Neurosciences of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have advanced a generalized concept as the basis for future studies of mental resilience.
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Shedding new light on the formation of emotional fear memories | RIKEN

Shedding new light on the formation of emotional fear memories | RIKEN | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Everyday events are easy to forget, but unpleasant ones can remain engraved in the brain. A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences identifies a neural mechanism through which unpleasant experiences are translated into signals that trigger fear memories by changing neural connections in a part of the brain called the amygdala. The findings show that a long-standing theory on how the brain forms memories, called Hebbian plasticity, is partially correct, but not as simple as was originally proposed.

 

Summary from Learning & the Brain Society Newsletter - January 2015:

Shedding new light on the formation of emotional fear memories 

RIKEN Brain Science Institute

 

Everyday events are easy to forget, but unpleasant ones can remain engraved in the brain. A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences identifies a neural mechanism through which unpleasant experiences are translated into signals that trigger fear memories by changing neural connections in a part of the brain called the amygdala. The findings show that a long-standing theory on how the brain forms memories, called Hebbian plasticity, is partially correct, but not as simple as was originally proposed.


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Study finds traumatic brain injury treatment is ineffective

Study finds traumatic brain injury treatment is ineffective | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
More than 1.7 million people in the U.S. alone suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) every year, often resulting in permanent disabilities or death.
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Why should adolescents with psychological symptoms be asked about hallucinations?

Why should adolescents with psychological symptoms be asked about hallucinations? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Visual distortions and hallucinations related to an elevated risk of psychosis are linked to self-destructive thought processes among adolescents with psychological symptoms, tells the recent study conducted at the Helsinki University Hospital,...
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An approach towards ethics: neuroscience and development

An approach towards ethics: neuroscience and development | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
For me personally it has always been a struggle, reading through all the philosophical and religious literature I have a long standing interest in, to verbalize my intuitive concept of morals in an...
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Safecracking the Brain

Safecracking the Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

It’s hard to imagine an encryption machine more sophisticated than the human brain. This three-pound blob of tissue holds an estimated 86 billion neurons, cells that rapidly fire electrical pulses in split-second response to whatever stimuli our bodies encounter in the external environment. Each neuron, in turn, has thousands of spindly branches that reach out to nodes, called synapses, which transmit those electrical messages to other cells. Somehow the brain interprets this impossibly noisy code, allowing us to effectively respond to an ever-changing world.

Given the complexity of the neural code, it’s not surprising that some neuroscientists are borrowing tricks from more experienced hackers: cryptographers, the puzzle-obsessed who draw on math, logic, and computer science to make and break secret codes.


http://nautil.us/issue/20/creativity/safecracking-the-brain-rp


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tom cockburn's curator insight, Today, 3:50 AM

Bit more than the Enigma machine of WW2 fame

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Neutron beams reveal how two potential pieces of Parkinson's puzzle fit

Neutron beams reveal how two potential pieces of Parkinson's puzzle fit | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
To understand diseases like Parkinson's, the tiniest of puzzles may hold big answers.
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Anxiety moderates amyloid-beta association with cognition

Anxiety moderates amyloid-beta association with cognition | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(HealthDay)—For older adults, elevated amyloid-β (Aβ) levels correlate with cognitive decline, and elevated anxiety moderates these associations, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Psychiatry.
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The unique spatial firing patterns of the hippocampal place cells

The unique spatial firing patterns of the hippocampal place cells | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Bayesian integration is thought to be used by the brain for optimal decision-making based on information from different sources.
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Chronic Pain Associated with Activation of Brain's Glial Cells

Chronic Pain Associated with Activation of Brain's Glial Cells | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"Patients with chronic pain show signs of glial activation in brain centers that modulate pain, according to results from a PET-MRI study"

 

Summary from BrainHQ Brain Fitness News: January 2015

Brain’s Glial Cells Drive Chronic Pain
Is your back out of whack? Blame your glial cells. Scientists in Boston have found that the brain’s glial cells play a key role in chronic pain. They plan to use this new finding to develop drugs that target the glial pathway in hopes of improving pain relief therapies. 


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Early Stage Researchers | MARATONE Marie Curie ITN programme

Early Stage Researchers | MARATONE Marie Curie ITN programme | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Research Fellows  (Early Stage Researchers) recruited in MARATONE have multi-disciplinary background in areas such as: epidemiology, health economics, law, medicine, mental health systems and policy, psychology, psychiatry, and other health professions, political science, public health, and statistics. In the MARATONE they will conduct research projects that have been designed to parallel the building blocks of the 2009 EU Resolution on Mental Health (EU, 2009):

  1. Mental health in youth and education
  2. Mental health of older people
  3. Prevention of depression and suicide
  4. Mental health in workplace setting
  5. Combating stigma and social exclusion
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Feedback and Emotions in the Trust Game

Feedback and Emotions in the Trust GameWe conduct an experiment on the impact of feedback in the Trust Game. In our treatment group, the Trustee has the opportunity to give feedback to the Investor (free in choice of wording and contents). The feedback option is found to reduce the share of Investors who sent no resources to the Trustee, while the impact on average behavior is less pronounced. The notion proposed by Xiao and Houser (2005, PNAS) according to which verbal feedback and monetary sanctions are substitutes is not supported. We use the PANAS-scale (Mackinnon et al., 1999) to capture change in subjects’ short-run affective state during the experiment. Receiving feedback has an impact on the Investors’ short-run affective state but giving feedback is not found to have an effect on Trustees’ short-run affective state.   


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Planning may start in brain's emotion centre

Planning may start in brain's emotion centre | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
An almond-shaped clusters of neurons deep in the brain known as the amygdala may play a vital part in long-term planning, suggests a new study.

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Brain Stimulation Induces Feelings Of Extreme Thirst In Mice

Brain Stimulation Induces Feelings Of Extreme Thirst In Mice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By directing pulses of light onto specific regions of the brain, researchers from Columbia University Medical Center induced feelings of extreme thirst in perfectly well hydrated mice — causing them to drink the equivalent of seven pints of water...
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Intracranial stimulation proved efficient in the recovery of learning and memory in rats

Intracranial stimulation proved efficient in the recovery of learning and memory in rats | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Stimulation of the hypothalamus completely reverses learning and memory deficits caused by brain lesions in rats, according to a first time discovery by a group of researchers led by the UAB.
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Magnetic Stimulation May Halt Rumination in Depression

Magnetic Stimulation May Halt Rumination in Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Transcranial magnetic stimulation could correct faulty connectivity
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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