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Study shows how neurons enable us to know smells we like and dislike, whether to approach or retreat

Study shows how neurons enable us to know smells we like and dislike, whether to approach or retreat | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Think of the smell of freshly baking bread. There is something in that smell, without any other cues – visual or tactile – that steers you toward the bakery.
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Cognitive Neuroscience
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The Neurobiology of Resilience

The Neurobiology of Resilience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Via Sandeep Gautam
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, Today, 7:41 AM

how resilience is manifested and instrumented in brains:-)

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Social Foraging
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‘Thunder’ helps neuroscientists analyze ‘big data’

‘Thunder’ helps neuroscientists analyze ‘big data’ | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

According to a report from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), new technologies for monitoring brain activity are generating unparalleled quantities of information. That data could offer new insights into how the brain works, but only if researchers can interpret it.

 

To help organize the data, neuroscientists can now harness the power of distributed computing using “Thunder,” a library of tools developed at the HHMI Janelia Research Campus.  According to the Freeman Lab, Thunder is a library for analyzing large-scale neural data. It’s fast to run, easy to develop for, and can be used interactively.  It is built on Spark, a new framework for cluster computing.


Via Ashish Umre
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Brain Disorders Might Arise from Starving Neurons

Brain Disorders Might Arise from Starving Neurons | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The neurons and blood vessels in your brain are usually tightly synchronized—but not always. Here's what can go wrong and how we can fix it
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Noise-induced hearing loss alters brain responses to speech

Noise-induced hearing loss alters brain responses to speech | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Prolonged exposure to loud noise alters how the brain processes speech, potentially increasing the difficulty in distinguishing speech sounds, according to neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Dallas.
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The Grand Illusion: Consciousness

The Grand Illusion: Consciousness | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Wherever you are reading this, take a moment now and notice your body: Are
your legs crossed? Is your posture straight or are you slouching? Are you
slightly warm or cold? Now notice your surroundings: Is your body in a
serene or noxious environment?  Is it being transported in a moving
vehicle, rocking slightly from side to side? If you could precisely answer
any of those questions, congratulations, you are conscious. How
consciousness arises from, as the great neuroscientist V.S. Ramachandran
mused, "a three-pound mass of jelly that you can hold in your palm" is one
of science's deepest enigmas.  
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What Processes in the Brain Allow You to Remember Dreams?

What Processes in the Brain Allow You to Remember Dreams? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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Long-Term Couples Develop Interconnected Memory Systems

Long-Term Couples Develop Interconnected Memory Systems | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research from Macquarie University in Australia reveals that intimate couples become part of an interpersonal cognitive system where each is dependent on the other to fill in certain memory gaps.
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A new brain-based marker of stress susceptibility

A new brain-based marker of stress susceptibility | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Some people can handle stressful situations better than others, and it's not all in their genes: Even identical twins show differences in how they respond.
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Team studies the social origins of intelligence in the brain

Team studies the social origins of intelligence in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By studying the injuries and aptitudes of Vietnam War veterans who suffered penetrating head wounds during the war, scientists are tackling—and beginning to answer—longstanding questions about how the brain works.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from the plastic brain
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Phobias may be memories passed down in genes from ancestors - Telegraph

Phobias may be memories passed down in genes from ancestors - Telegraph | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Memories may be passed down through generations in DNA in a process that may be the underlying cause of phobias

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New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer's, related diseases - Medical Xpress

New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer's, related diseases - Medical Xpress | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Medical Xpress New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer's, related diseases Medical Xpress University of Washington bioengineers have a designed a peptide structure that can stop the harmful changes of the body's normal proteins into a...

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This Is Your Brain on a Break Up

This Is Your Brain on a Break Up | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"...One of the hallmarks of heartbreak, Piver claims, is obsessiveness: you can’t help but wonder if things would have turned out different if you were taller or shorter or more or less sensitive or a better communicator or if you would have said something else in an argument or made your needs more plainly known or cut off all your hair much earlier. “Your rational mind cannot step in and go, ‘stop that,’” Piver says. “The first step in calming this wild animal is just develop some kind of relationship with that obsessiveness so you can begin to calm it.” Without that relationship, you’re just on the “holy shit the sky is falling” ride all the time. But calm doesn’t come from telling the wild animal of the broken-hearted discursive mind to shut up. Instead, Piver says the calm comes from sitting down, making space, letting the wild animal go crazy, and watching it subside..." [click on the title for the full article]


Via Dimitris Tsantaris, Luis Valdes
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How playing an instrument benefits your brain - TED-Ed

How playing an instrument benefits your brain - TED-Ed | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"When you listen to music, multiple areas of your brain become engaged and active. But when you actually play an instrument, that activity becomes more like a full-body brain workout. What’s going on? Anita Collins explains the fireworks that go off in musicians’ brains when they play, and examines some of the long-term positive effects of this mental workout."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 27, 3:25 PM

Music does amazing things in your brain, and playing music creates "a full-body brain workout." This video shares what happens in the brain when it hears music, or when the individual is playing music. The science is showing that the playing of music increases executive functioning skills.

Along with a short quiz (that includes multiple choice anc some open response questions) you will also find a number of additional resources that look at the brain as well as how music impacts the brain.

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Research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems

Research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
More accurate tests could be created to diagnose diseases such as Alzheimer’s or memory problems stemming from head injuries, leading to earlier intervention, according to new findings from the University of East Anglia (UEA).
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Social origins of intelligence in the brain

Social origins of intelligence in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By studying the injuries and aptitudes of Vietnam War veterans who suffered penetrating head wounds during the war, scientists are tackling -- and beginning to answer -- longstanding questions about how the brain works.
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New mapping approach lets scientists zoom in and out as the brain processes sound

New mapping approach lets scientists zoom in and out as the brain processes sound | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have mapped the sound-processing part of the mouse brain in a way that keeps both the proverbial forest and the trees in view.
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Boosting neural pathway from gut to brain could play part in weight control

Boosting neural pathway from gut to brain could play part in weight control | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A Purdue University study found an increase in sensory nerve fibers that send signals from the gut to the brain reduces the time spent eating a meal, which could help regulate body weight.
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Brain State Bread Crumbs Lead Way Back to Consciousness

Brain State Bread Crumbs Lead Way Back to Consciousness | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers studying anesthetized rats discovered a handful of activity patterns that may mark the path to consciousness after anesthesia. Karen Hopkin reports
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Frontiers | Extended evolutionary psychology: the importance of transgenerational developmental plasticity | Evolutionary Psychology and Neuroscience

What kind mechanisms one deems central for the evolutionary process deeply influences one’s understanding of the nature of organisms, including cognition. Reversely, adopting a certain approach to ...
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How is depression related to dementia?

How is depression related to dementia? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study by neuropsychiatric researchers at Rush University Medical Center gives insight into the relationship between depression and dementia.
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Conceptual representation in the brain: Towards mind-reading

Conceptual representation in the brain: Towards mind-reading | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Your measured brain signals can reveal whether you are thinking about an animal or a tool. That's what neuroscientist Irina Simanova discovered during her PhD at Radboud University, where she investigated the conceptual representation of words and objects in the human brain. This knowledge is useful ...
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Memory relies on astrocytes, the brain's lesser known cells

Memory relies on astrocytes, the brain's lesser known cells | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When you're expecting something—like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant—or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain.
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Man In The Mirror: How Empathy Creates Insight

Man In The Mirror: How Empathy Creates Insight | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

by  Bill Cloke
So how do we know when we are being empathic? One way is to check it out. Asking for acknowledgement is one way to know what someone is feeling...


 How can we define empathy? Heinz Kohut, one of the fathers of modern psychology describes it best when he defines empathy as "vicarious introspection." Kohut describes empathy as an intellectual process and is distinguished from compassion and sympathy by our ability to determine what the other is about without the aid of emotion. He uses the example of how Hitler understood empathy when he placed sirens on his dive bombers because he knew what it would do to the people on the ground. As his troops came into town the people were so scared they immediately surrendered because he had already won the psychological battle.


It was Kohut who postulated that all psychological difficulties begin with empathic failures.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Human brain has coping mechanism for dehydration

Human brain has coping mechanism for dehydration | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(HealthDay)—Although dehydration significantly reduces blood flow to the brain, researchers in England have found that the brain compensates by increasing the amount of oxygen it extracts from the blood.
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The Power Of Empathy

The Power Of Empathy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The basic requirement for Empathy is to identify the Common Ground. Once the common ground is established, it gives the person an opportunity to walk in the other person’s shoes.


Stephen R. Covey states “Nothing is more validating and affirming than feeling understood. And the moment a person begins feeling understood, that person becomes far more open to influence and change. Empathy is to the heart what air is to the body.


We should never make assumptions and must have the courage to ask questions to understand from the other person’s perspective.


Here are some powerful quotes from various people that emphasize the Importance and the Power of Empathy.

  • A prerequisite to empathy is simply paying attention to the person in pain. – Daniel Goleman
  • Empathy is about standing in someone else’s shoes, feeling with his or her heart, seeing with his or her eyes. Not only is empathy hard to outsource and automate, but it makes the world a better place. – Daniel H. Pink
  • When you show deep empathy toward others, their defensive energy goes down, and positive energy replaces it. That’s when you can get more creative in solving problems. – Stephen Covey
  • ....


image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ear 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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